Book Reviews of The Sound Of The Mountain

The Sound Of The Mountain
The Sound Of The Mountain
Author: Yasunari Kawabata, Edward G. Seidensticker
ISBN-13: 9780425039731
ISBN-10: 0425039730
Rating:
  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
 1

5 stars, based on 1 rating
Publisher: Wideview / Perigee
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Sound Of The Mountain on + 155 more book reviews
Kawabata won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1964, ushering in an outpouring of translations of his works. From a Western perspective, he can be a challenging storyteller: His stories don't end neatly with all conflicts and issues tidily explained. His characters are complex and sometime obstinate enough to seem like relatives.
reviewed The Sound Of The Mountain on
Taken from the back cover.

The Sound of the Mountain is one of Yasunari Kawabatas most important works. Its quality is luminous and intense; its concern is with the anxieties and desires of an old man, Shingo who hears the sound of the mountain the faint rumble in the hills that is a muffled hint of unknown occurrences and a foreboding of death. And his emotions the affection (perhaps even sexual desire) he feels for his daughter-in-law, the increasing tensions of his relations with his wife, son, and daughter are also muffled, indistinct, subtle, yet disturbingly powerful. The events of the novel are real and immediate, yet throughout they are touched and unified by an almost dreamlike symbolism. The resulting whole is a remarkable expression of the unique talents of this great writer, a winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1968.
reviewed The Sound Of The Mountain on + 46 more book reviews
"The Sound of the Mountain" is one of Yasunari Kawabata's most important works. Its quality is luminous and intense; its concern is with the anxieties and desires of an old man, Shingo, who lives with his family in a suburb of Tokyo. It is Shingo who hears "the sound of the mountain" - the faint rumble in the hills that is a muffled hint of unknown occurrences and a foreboding of death. And his emotions - the affecting (perhaps even sexual desire) he feels for his daughter-in-law, the increasing tensios of his relations with his wife, son, and daughter - are also muffled, indistinct, subtle, yet disturbingly powerful. The events of the novel are real and immediate, yet throughout they are touched and unified by an almost dreamlike symbolism. The resulting whole is a remarkable epxression of the unique talents of this great writer, a winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1968.