Discussion Forums - Westerns

Topic: Are there Spaghetti Western novels?

Club rule - Please, if you cannot be courteous and respectful, do not post in this forum.
  Unlock Forum posting with Annual Membership.
Subject: Are there Spaghetti Western novels?
Date Posted: 6/23/2009 4:22 AM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2009
Posts: 169
Back To Top

I suppose any western novel written by an Italian would qualify as one. I dunno

Date Posted: 7/14/2010 9:45 PM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2009
Posts: 169
Back To Top

bump one year later

Subject: Yes, there are spaghetti western books
Date Posted: 2/17/2011 1:18 PM ET
Member Since: 1/22/2011
Posts: 14
Back To Top

This blog is dedicated to the preservation, investigation and all things related to European films and personnel involved with the Western genre. Tom B.

 

Monday, January 10, 2011

The Dollar Books part I - Frank Chandler

 
10+George+Gilman+photo.jpg
After the success of The Man With No Name trilogy of films, a series of books were released that covered the three films, but also added a few more adventures for the Stranger made famous by the Leone films. The first of the these books was “Fistful of Dollars” and is based on the screenplay of the film. This book, although part of the series of ‘Dollar’ books was not released in the United States but was only available in England. The author was Frank Chandler but like many of the actors in the Spaghetti westerns this was a pseudonym for writer Terry Harknett. He’s probably the most influential British western writer in the last half of the 20th century. Terence William Harknett was born on Rainham, Essex, England on December 14, 1936. Originally Terry wanted to become a car mechanic but after his schooling at Rainham Secondary Modern School in 1951 he became a reporter. He went to work as a copy boy at Reuters News Agency. Later he became a typist at Reuters Comtelburo and in 1953 wrote and sold his first short story ‘Katie’s Birthday’, a romance novel. With little background other then the westerns he had seen in the theaters, he wrote his first western short story ‘Guns at the Silver Horshoe’ which appeared in the January 14, 1955 issue of Reveille. He then went into military service until returning to civilian life where he went to work as a publicity assistant at the British office of 20th Century Fox. In 1960 he married Jane Harman and became a reporter and features editor for National Newsagent a weekly book trade magazine.

10+Dollar+Books.jpg

Terry’s first western novelization was for an adaptation of the film “A Town Called Bastard” (1971) using the name William Terry. Following this was “A Fistful of Dollars” in 1972 as Frank Chandler. Again as William Terry he turned out adaptions of “Hannie Caulder” and “Red Sun” both in 1972. He was then commissioned to write four original westerns. He didn’t think he could do it, but he was told he could write and he had seen western films so what more of a background did he need. He later said it was an easy world to get into as long as you keep your guns correct. He researched his subject matter as he went along. When he started to write the ‘Edge’ series he stopped watching westerns on film and TV, fearing he’d copy something he’d seen. Using the name George G. Gilman he began with ‘The Loner” in 1972. The Edge character was completely new to the western book world. He was violent, anti-social, and chauvinistic. He only survived in his Spaghetti Western world by being twice as mean as his opponents. Writing from nine to five, five days a week, Terry could turn out a book in eleven days. After the Edge series he created another anti-hero in Adam Steele. Other characters developed were Jubal Cade, Apache, and Undertaker. In all Terry wrote some 130 westerns in seventeen years, 60 Edge adventures alone.

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

http://westernsallitaliana.blogspot.com/2011/01/dollar-books-part-one.html 

 

I will try to post more soon, but this will quench your thirst a little

 

Sincerely,

 

 

David

Love is the Answer

John 3:16

Subject: Part III about the Dollar Westerns
Date Posted: 2/17/2011 1:21 PM ET
Member Since: 1/22/2011
Posts: 14
Back To Top
skip to main | skip to sidebar

This blog is dedicated to the preservation, investigation and all things related to European films and personnel involved with the Western genre. Tom B.

 

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

The Dollar Books part III - Brian Fox

 
26+Brian+Fox.jpg
Dollar author Brian Fox was actually born Willis Todhunter Ballard on December 13, 1903 in Cleveland, Ohio. After trying to follow in his father’s footsteps and become an electrical engineer. He realized he did not like working for anyone and found himself quickly fired from every job he took. He found he had a way with words and so he took jobs as a staff writer for Warner Brothers and Columbia in the early 1920s. Often going uncredited and going nowhere he began his writing career in 1927 and since then produced over 100 novels and over 50 movie and television screenplays and stories. He wrote over 1000 short stories and novelettes which appeared in pulp magazines and elite publications such as The Saturday Evening Post, Esquire, This Week and McCalls. Known for his Westerns and mystery novels, he was a major crime writer for Black Mask creating the character Bill Lennox, with a long, prolific career, often fast, sometimes proto-hardboiled, frequently complicated, usually slick and with human warmth. After World War II he turned to writing western novels exclusively and turned out an amazing 78 books. He was past vice-president of the Western Writers of America. He never won any MWA award, although he did capture the 1965 Western Writers of America Spur Award for his novel ‘Gold in California’ (1965). In the 1970s he retired to Florida and passed away on December 27, 1980 in Mt. Dora, Florida. Ballard used a number of aliases such as Brian Agar, P D Ballard, W.T. Ballard, Parker Bonner, Sam Bowie, Walt Bruce, Hunter D'Allard, Brian Fox, John Grange, Harrison Hunt (with Norbert Davis), John Hunter, Neil MacNeil, Clint Reno, John Shepherd, Jack Slade, Clay Turner. As Brian Fox he turned out the Dollar book ‘A Dollar to Die For’.
 
Subject: Dollar Books part II
Date Posted: 2/17/2011 1:28 PM ET
Member Since: 1/22/2011
Posts: 14
Back To Top
skip to main | skip to sidebar

This blog is dedicated to the preservation, investigation and all things related to European films and personnel involved with the Western genre. Tom B.

 
Showing newest posts for query dollar books. Show older posts
Showing newest posts for query dollar books. Show older posts
 

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

 

Thursday, January 20, 2011

The Dollar Books part II - Joe Millard

 
20+Joe+Millard.jpg

Joseph John Millard was born in Canby, Minnesota on January 14, 1908, the fourth child of rancher Frank Earnest Millard and his wife Alice A. He received his education at the Pioneer School of Business in St. Paul, Minnesota, graduating in 1926, before joining an advertising agency. He subsequently worked as advertising manager on Northwest Furniture Digest in Minneapolis before becoming an account executive with Minneapolis-based Kraff Advertising Agency and Chicago-based Industrial Advertising Associates.

In Chicago, he began editing How To Sell magazine, subsequently editing and publishing National Mortician, before turning freelance as a writer in 1936.

He was a prolific contributor to pulp magazines, including Thrilling Mystery, G-Man Detective, Exciting Detective, Detective Novels Magazine, Popular Detective, RAF Aces, Exciting Western, Popular Sports, Sky Fighters, Fantastic Adventures, Amazing Stories, Thrilling Wonder Stories (as N. J. Westwood) and Startling Stories in the 1940s before contributing articles to Bluebook. He eventually contributed to around 100 different magazines and some 25 trade journals, including Holiday, Reader's Digest, Good Housekeeping and Argosy. Joe sometimes used the alias N.J. Westwood. Joe wrote six books in the ‘Dollar’ series - For a Few Dollars More and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, A Coffin Full of Dollars, The Devil’s Dollar Sign, The Million Dollar Bloodhunt and Blood for a Dirty Dollar.

Millard was married to Amy Leone Lee on February 14, 1931 and had one son. He died on February 18, 1989. - Steve Holland


20+Blood+for+a+Dirty+Dollar.jpg
 
Date Posted: 4/17/2011 9:27 PM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2009
Posts: 169
Back To Top

wow...almost 2 years after posting this thread, I get a reply! Thanks David for the info! I own all 3 Sergio Leone dollar westerns. Should have known there were novelizations of it! Duh

 

Thanks again David