Book Reviews of The Starseed Transmissions: An Extraterrestrial Report (Starseed Series, Vol 1)

The Starseed Transmissions: An Extraterrestrial Report (Starseed Series, Vol 1)
The Starseed Transmissions An Extraterrestrial Report - Starseed Series, Vol 1
Author: Raphael, Ken Carey
ISBN-13: 9780912949000
ISBN-10: 0912949007
Publication Date: 10/1986
Pages: 95
Rating:
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 3

3.7 stars, based on 3 ratings
Publisher: Talman Co
Book Type: Paperback
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From the author's introduction: "It was during a cold and snowy period of eleven days from December 27, 1978 to January 6, 1979 that the whole of this material was recorded. I have taken the liberty of editing out the repetition and rearranging it in chapter format, but aside from that, I share it with you as it was first presented to me.

In the years that have passed since those eleven winter days when my little eight-by-ten office seemed to literally pulsate with the rhythyms of some alien, yet hauntingly familiar, intelligence. I have given thought a number of times to publication. Yet my own life has been so filled with the momentum of such incredible change that I have hardly been able, until now, to take the proposition seriously. I can certainly attest to the truth of what is stated in these transmissions: one's life does indeed begin to change when one decides to work with the approaching forces.

I hope the significance of this material is not lost to certain readers because of a reluctance to accept its purported origin. Regardless of one's opinion on the plausibility of extraterrestrial or angelic communion, it might be pointed out that the simple act of structuring information in this manner opens up communicative possibilities that are virtually non-existent in a conventional mode. Much of what is communicated in these pages would not easily lend itself to other, more traditional ways of conveying information."