Book Reviews of The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13)

The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13)
The Summer That Never Was - Inspector Banks, Bk 13
Author: Peter Robinson
ISBN-13: 9780330489355
ISBN-10: 0330489356
Publication Date: 9/5/2003
Pages: 512
Edition: New Ed
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 6

4 stars, based on 6 ratings
Publisher: Pan
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

15 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 404 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
Peter Robinson's Alan Banks series is under-appreciated. Banks is a police detective in mid-Yorkshire. He's a decent guy, fairly normal, moderately intelligent, and gifted at following twisted, complex trails to find the criminals.

This story involves finding the bones of a murder victim thirty-five years after his unsolved disappearance took place. At time, the victim was one of the teenaged Banks' best friends.

At the same time, another teenage boy has disappeared in current time. Banks is involved in both investigations in different ways--he's assigned to the current murder, and he helps out as an interested party in the investigation of the older crime.

Robinson skillfully intertwines the two stories as Banks and his associates in two cities separately work through the web of clues, false trails, hints, and facts to find the both killers.

Along the way, we learn a great deal about English life, including the ever-present class struggles and animosity, crime, and daily life in both the mid-60s and now.

I recommend all of Robinson's books, including this one. It's thoughtful, pleasant reading that exercises your intellect just enough to keep you thoroughly awake while watching an expert detective do his job. (It also helps to be of an age with Banks--his meandering through his memories of his friend 35 years ago in the 60s includes a lot of references to the music of the time, which was important to me in those days, too.)
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 348 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A childhood friend went missing - and years later his remains are found. Incredibly, Inspector Banks is a suspect. A modern case parallels and the action and suspense mount.
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 404 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Peter Robinson's Alan Banks series is under-appreciated. Banks is a police detective in mid-Yorkshire. He's a decent guy, fairly normal, moderately intelligent, and gifted at following twisted, complex trails to find the criminals.

This story involves finding the bones of a murder victim thirty-five years after his unsolved disappearance took place. At time, the victim was one of the teenaged Banks' best friends.

At the same time, another teenage boy has disappeared in current time. Banks is involved in both investigations in different ways--he's assigned to the current murder, and he helps out as an interested party in the investigation of the older crime.

Robinson skillfully intertwines the two stories as Banks and his associates in two cities separately work through the web of clues, false trails, hints, and facts to find the both killers.

Along the way, we learn a great deal about English life, including the ever-present class struggles and animosity, crime, and daily life in both the mid-60s and now.

I recommend all of Robinson's books, including this one. It's thoughtful, pleasant reading that exercises your intellect just enough to keep you thoroughly awake while watching an expert detective do his job. (It also helps to be of an age with Banks--his meandering through his memories of his friend 35 years ago in the 60s includes a lot of references to the music of the time, which was important to me in those days, too.)
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 404 more book reviews
Peter Robinson's Alan Banks series is under-appreciated. Banks is a police detective in mid-Yorkshire. He's a decent guy, fairly normal, moderately intelligent, and gifted at following twisted, complex trails to find the criminals.

This story involves finding the bones of a murder victim thirty-five years after his unsolved disappearance took place. At time, the victim was one of the teenaged Banks' best friends.

At the same time, another teenage boy has disappeared in current time. Banks is involved in both investigations in different ways--he's assigned to the current murder, and he helps out as an interested party in the investigation of the older crime.

Robinson skillfully intertwines the two stories as Banks and his associates in two cities separately work through the web of clues, false trails, hints, and facts to find the both killers.

Along the way, we learn a great deal about English life, including the ever-present class struggles and animosity, crime, and daily life in both the mid-60s and now.

I recommend all of Robinson's books, including this one. It's thoughtful, pleasant reading that exercises your intellect just enough to keep you thoroughly awake while watching an expert detective do his job. (It also helps to be of an age with Banks--his meandering through his memories of his friend 35 years ago in the 60s includes a lot of references to the music of the time, which was important to me in those days, too.)
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 242 more book reviews
A suspense/mystery story about a lost teenaged boy whose bones are found buried in an open field. The bones had been there since 1965. Their discovery strongly effects Chief Inspector Alan Banks bringing to mind a heinous crime that happened during that time.
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on
Surprisingly good read - characters are nicely fleshed out and the plot is complex enough to make it interesting without losing the thread of the story.
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 366 more book reviews
one in a British series about Chief Inspector Alan Banks-they all have great plots and characters.
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 459 more book reviews
Underneath all the endless complications, Detective Inspector Alan Banks's behemoth 13th appearance is a case of two dead boys. DNA evidence, directed by some smart forensics, identifies the first as Graham Marshall, a childhood friend of Banks's who went missing from his Yorkshire newspaper route 35 years ago. Hearing that his skeletal remains have been found, Banks hastens home to Peterborough, where he finds the local constabulary eyeing his long-withheld revelation-Banks himself had been attacked and nearly drowned by an unidentified stranger two months before Graham went missing-with suspicion and a present-day case unfolding in ways that disturbingly echo the past.
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 13 more book reviews
Another great Banks mystery!
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 26 more book reviews
A powerful and complex Inspector BAnks Mystery.
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 11 more book reviews
Another great Inspector Banks read
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 29 more book reviews
Very complex look back at a disappearance 35 years ago of a childhood friend whose remains suddenly appear. Good read
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 35 more book reviews
There are human bones buried in an open field, the remains of a lost teenaged boy whose disappearance devastated a community more than thirty-five years ago...and scarred a guilt-ridden friend forever. A long-hidden horror has been unearthed, dragging a tormented policeman back into a past he could never truly forget no matter how desperately her tried. A heinous crime that occurred too close to home still has its grip on Chief Inspector Alan Banks--and it's leading him into a dark place where evil still dwells. Because the secrets that doomed young Graham Marshall back in 1965 remain alive and lethal--and disturbing them could cost Banks much more than he ever imagined.
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 535 more book reviews
In this 13th book of the DCI Banks series, we get an interesting view into Banks' childhood when he returns home to investigate a murder of his childhood friend. Soon Banks' finds himself engrossed in a more current murder of Luke Armitage, another teenage boy. I liked following the aspects of both murders while the author slowly builds the level of suspense/tension as each new plot development is revealed so that you really had an on-the-edge-of-your-seat feeling. The characters were also well drawn and fully developed. All in all this book was a very entertaining read.
reviewed The Summer That Never Was (Inspector Banks, Bk 13) on + 167 more book reviews
Tried to read but couldn't stay interested.