Book Reviews of The Sword in the Stone

The Sword in the Stone
The Sword in the Stone
Author: T. H. White
ISBN-13: 9780440984450
ISBN-10: 0440984459
Publication Date: 10/15/1978
Pages: 288
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 61

4.2 stars, based on 61 ratings
Publisher: Laurel Leaf
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

7 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Sword in the Stone on + 8 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This book is the complete and unabridged version of The Sword in the Stone by T. H. White. It is an excellent story about King Arthur, Merlin and the sword that made Arther famous and led him to be king of England.
reviewed The Sword in the Stone on + 3 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Classic childres book that all ages can enjoy
reviewed The Sword in the Stone on + 61 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Everybody should read this book at least once! (Or have it read to them)
reviewed The Sword in the Stone on + 63 more book reviews
T.H. White's treatment of Arthur, which he more fully develops in "The Once and Future King," is one of my favorite renderings of the legend.

"The Sword in the Stone" shows White at his finest, creatively speaking. His depiction of life in the Forest Savage and of Arthur's entire childhood with Sir Ector and Kay is entirely his, and it is filled with attention to detail and wry wit. The book starts around the time Arthur is around seven or eight, still unaware of his parentage, and living in the care of Sir Ector.

The book is riddled with memorable characters like Sir Grummore and King Pellinore, what; charming buffoons like the sergeant-at-arms with his heaving chest and the nurse who fusses over everyone; and (of course) Merlyn. During the course of the book, Merlyn teaches Arthur by changing him into animals, all with an eye on the day when Arthur will be crowned king and will have the chance to inaugurate a golden age where Might fights for Right, rather than making right.

"The Once and Future King," of course, was White's treatise on pacifism, as well as his exploration of the triumphs and failings of government, and you see a lot of this in "The Sword in the Stone." Arthur has a miserable time among the ants who are preparing for war; and falls in love with life among the geese, for whom war is a completely foreign concept. (Both stories appropriated from White's final and least impressive Arthurian work, "The Book of Merlyn.")

If you have a child you would like to interest in Arthur, in fantasy, or just in reading, this is an excellent book to begin the journey.
reviewed The Sword in the Stone on + 71 more book reviews
This is the first volume of T.H. White's The Once and Future King (this copy was printed in 1963) and was the inspiration for the Disney version of King Arthur. It's a fascinating take on Arthur's boyhood, focusing on Merlin's influence.
reviewed The Sword in the Stone on + 19 more book reviews
The Sword in the Stone re-creates the training of a boy named Arthur who is destined to draw the sword from the stone and become the king of England.
reviewed The Sword in the Stone on + 51 more book reviews
The Sword And The Stone recreates, against the background of magnificent pageantry and dark magic that was medieval England, the education and training of young King Arthur, who was to become the greatest of Britain's legendary rulers.
Growing up in a colorful world peopled by knights in armor and fair damsels, foul monsters and evil witches, young Arthur slowly learns the code of being a gentleman. Under the wise guidance of Merlin, the all-powerful magician for whom life progresses backwards, the king-to-be is trained in the gusty pursuits of falconry, jousting, hunting and sword play. He is even transformed by his remarkable old tutor into various animals, so that he may experience life from all points of view. In every conceivable and exciting way he is readied for the day when he, and he alone of all Englishmen, is destined to draw forth the marvelous sword from the magic stone and become the rightful King of England.