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Topic: TOOOO Quiet in here game.

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Subject: TOOOO Quiet in here game.
Date Posted: 9/14/2011 9:06 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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Something from the book you just read.

India's view on Disraeli...He wore a silk dressing gown of crimson, soft slippers of scarlet leather tooled with his crest, and a scarlet Fez with a black silk tassel dangling over his ear.  A single ringlet corkscrewed out of the Fez over his forehead.  Lord if the man didn't have style at least he had courage.

India on the Marchioness... It was tempting to blame French for saddling me with this snuff dipping, narcoleptic, bibliophile.

India Black on Bagpipes...Sane people do not make musical instruments out of a sheep bladder and a bundle of reeds.  What prompts a bloke to pick up an internal organ from a ovis aries and squeeze it in the first place? The mind boggles.  India Black and the Widow and the Windsor.



Last Edited on: 9/16/11 10:42 AM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 9/14/2011 9:40 PM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
Posts: 4,035
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Reading NF right now, sorry. Although Catherine the Great's crown had a 389 carot ruby.

 

 Russian Imperial Crown.svg

Date Posted: 9/14/2011 10:08 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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WOW!

Date Posted: 9/14/2011 11:26 PM ET
Member Since: 8/17/2009
Posts: 1,588
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I'm reading The Far Pavillions now.  It grabbed me right away.  The book opens with the main character's birth in India.  His mother dies at birth, his father and most of the household of illness about four/five years later, and his nurse (whose husband died in the illness, too) takes him across country to give him to what's left of his extended family.  Only to be caught in the middle of an uprising with rebels killing every white/Brit they can find.  So she hides out in some little village district and claims him as her own son.  And by the time it was over and safe to try again, she viewed him as rightfully hers and couldn't/wouldn't. 

It made me wonder:  Over the course of centuries of ethnic clashes where one side starts killing off the other, I wonder how many infants have been saved by similar claiming by neighbors and friends over the years.  A good number of Jewish infants were saved that way from the Nazis.  When native Greeks, Germanic tribes, etc, rose up and wiped out resident Romans, were any Roman infants rescued that way?  And if so, I wonder how many grew up and never knew their true origins.

 

Date Posted: 9/14/2011 11:53 PM ET
Member Since: 3/23/2008
Posts: 2,474
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Love The Far Pavilions, one of my all time favorites!

I'm reading Bones of the Hills by Conn Iggulden (finally got into it after a day of trying to decide if I was ready for it yet) book #3 of the Genghis Khan saga.  There is an awesome battle chase scene, I don't know what else to call it, that just about breaks your heart.  You don't know who to root for, but you certainly agonize for the horses on both sides.

Date Posted: 9/15/2011 8:20 AM ET
Member Since: 3/8/2009
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I just finished listening to The Girl Who Stirred the Hornet's Nest, the last in the Millineum Trilogy.  The showdown at the end where she nailed the bad guy's feet to the floor with a nail gun had me laughing! 

Date Posted: 9/15/2011 8:34 AM ET
Member Since: 5/19/2007
Posts: 4,710
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Okay, so I finished Twelve Sharp by Janet Evanovich last night.  I was reading late, trying to be quiet because my poor DH needed a good night's sleep.  But then Grandma Mazur joined a band with Lula and Sally Sweet.  They had costumes:

"Grandma and Lula were wearing black leather hot pants and ice-cream -cone bras.  Grandma looked like a soup chicken dressed up like Madonna.  She was all slack skin and knobby knees and slightly bowed legs.  Her blond wig was slightly askew, and her ice-cream-cone bra hung low, not from the weight of her breasts but from location.  Gravity hadn't been kind to Grandma."

I snorted a bit.  But I had to be quiet.  Then:

"Lula and Grandma went into their dance routine and Morelli broke out in a sweat from the effort of maintaining composure.  Grandma wobbled into an amp, snagged her heel on the cord, and fell over into the drum set, taking the bass player down with her.  She was on her back, under cymbals and the bass player, with only her platform shoes showing."

Now I'm chuckling, but silently..very quiet.  And you know how when you are trying to laugh quietly, it makes everything funnier?  And you have to work harder to be quiet, all the while thinking how silly (and funny) the whole situation is.  Then:

"We got Grandma to her feet and fixed her wig and adjusted her breasts.  'I'm okay,' Grandma said. 'I just caught my heel on the wire and unplugged the thingy.'  Grandma bent down to plug the amp back in and farted in the black leather hot pants.  'Oops,' Grandma said. 'Somebody step on a duck?'

I lost it.  I had tears rolling down my cheeks, I was snuffling into the hand clamped over my mouth.  The scene didn't warrant a total laugh meltdown, but I had one.  

DH slept through it all.

 

Date Posted: 9/15/2011 10:10 AM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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LOL Vicky!!!! 

Date Posted: 9/15/2011 10:40 AM ET
Member Since: 3/8/2009
Posts: 6,035
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That may be the BEST Grandma Mazur scene in the whole series.  I love Sally Sweet!

Date Posted: 9/15/2011 10:02 PM ET
Member Since: 5/31/2009
Posts: 2,915
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Not HF but great reading anyway:  30 Great Short Stories by W. Somerset Maugham and I just finished One Hundred Years of Solitude - wow!  Next up Atonement - GF group read.



Last Edited on: 9/15/11 10:03 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 9/16/2011 10:21 AM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
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krŭl'ər) pronunciation
n.
  1. Chiefly Northeastern, Central Atlantic, & Upper Northern U.S. A small, usually ring-shaped or twisted cake of sweet dough fried in deep fat.
  2. Chiefly New England & Pennsylvania. An unraised doughnut, usually twisted but also shaped into rings or oblongs.


The origin being a man in New Amsterdam (New York) named Krol who was very very fond of those doughnut thingies.

Book: From Distant Shores by Bruce NIcolayson.
 



Last Edited on: 9/16/11 10:21 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 9/16/2011 10:49 AM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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I love these.  Luckily the place near me that made them fresh every morning moved.  Not so convenient any more. :P

Date Posted: 9/16/2011 11:26 AM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
Posts: 4,035
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My status update at Goodreads has sparked some discussion about the famous Voodoo Doughnuts in Portland Oregon.

Date Posted: 9/16/2011 11:46 AM ET
Member Since: 7/22/2009
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Umm -- I'm really hungry now.

Date Posted: 9/16/2011 3:28 PM ET
Member Since: 3/23/2008
Posts: 2,474
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I used to take a business trip every fall to Portland, Oregon and had to always visit Voodoo Donuts and also one of the Moonstruck Chocolates stores. Double yum!

Date Posted: 9/16/2011 9:52 PM ET
Member Since: 3/8/2009
Posts: 6,035
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At the end of Lords of the North, Uhtred and his enemy exchanging insults:

    Ivarr looked at me, his serpent eyes unreadable. "I watched a goat vomit yesterday," he said, "and what it threw up reminded me of you."
    "I watched a goat sh** yesterday," I retorted, "and what it dropped reminded me of you...The goat-turd reminded me of you, but its smell reminded me of your mother."

That may be the earliest recorded use of the fatal "yo mamma" insult.  Round 1 to Uhtred!

Date Posted: 9/16/2011 10:30 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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~snort~  LOL