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Topic: A Tale of Two Cities

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Subject: A Tale of Two Cities
Date Posted: 10/10/2009 9:51 AM ET
Member Since: 5/18/2008
Posts: 123
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So...I finished it two nights ago. It was around 10:30 at night, and after I finished the last word, all I could do was sit there and shiver, wide-eyed. No, it wasn't cold. Go to sleep, says you? Impossible, says I. That was an amazing book.

Who else loves it?? Who's your favorite character, and what else do you like in terms of themes, quotes, etc.

Rick B. (bup) - ,
Date Posted: 10/10/2009 4:34 PM ET
Member Since: 11/2/2007
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Yeah, it's a good one, alright.

Date Posted: 10/14/2009 9:30 AM ET
Member Since: 6/19/2007
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I should read that again, I haven't read it since I was a sophomore in high school but I remember having the exact same reaction!

Date Posted: 10/15/2009 10:46 AM ET
Member Since: 2/16/2009
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I only book I read that made my care about the French Revolution.

Date Posted: 11/10/2009 7:44 PM ET
Member Since: 7/25/2007
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I know loved it back when I was in high school.  I have to read it again because I vaguely remember it.:)

Date Posted: 12/8/2009 5:47 AM ET
Member Since: 12/1/2009
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Although the literary love of my life  is Mr. Darcy from "Pride and Prejudice", I admire Sydney Carton more than any literary character. 

I read the book back in sophomore highschool, outside of school requirements.  One of these days I plan to re-read the classics and this is a must-read.

It still has one of the best opening lines in all of literature.

Kat (polbio) -
Date Posted: 12/9/2009 4:42 PM ET
Member Since: 10/10/2008
Posts: 3,067
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Tale of Two Cities, is one of my all time favorite books. My ten year old is reading it right now (as an Illustrated Classic) and I am enjoying discussing it with her.  It is deffinately a book that sticks with you.  I am glad you enjoyed it.

Date Posted: 2/24/2010 12:07 PM ET
Member Since: 10/14/2007
Posts: 2,090
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Last Edited on: 3/8/10 7:03 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 2/24/2010 2:45 PM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2009
Posts: 25,000
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It was around 10:30 at night, and after I finished the last word, all I could do was sit there and shiver, wide-eyed. No, it wasn't cold. Go to sleep, says you? Impossible, says I. That was an amazing book.

Why, why, why? says I

Tell me more, I beg you. What's it about. No, don't just say it was about the French Rev. I know that! Why was it shiver worthy?

Date Posted: 2/24/2010 7:39 PM ET
Member Since: 6/26/2007
Posts: 87
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Tell me more, I beg you. What's it about. No, don't just say it was about the French Rev. I know that! Why was it shiver worthy?

Bits of it are just creepy. Madame DeFarge is knitting something (I forget what?) that contains a code-- that code lists all the enemies of their rebellion that they're planning to kill. Just learning that made me uncomfortable, for some reason. I developed a fear of knitting... :)

I read this in 2008 so I'd be prepared when I saw the Broadway musical. I cried a couple times through the last few pages. It was just very touching and I cared so much about the characters.

(FYI, I think the musical is on DVD and CD now-- I'd really suggest checking it out if you're interested. It tanked on Broadway, but it was a great show. Really made me cry more than the book did, at points.)

Date Posted: 2/24/2010 7:49 PM ET
Member Since: 2/16/2009
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My two cents worth - this was my first Classic's challenge book. I read it because, well, I never have! I knew loosely what would happen but I still cried, foolishly, at the end. It's that darn Charles Dickens, he wrote so well and with such great caring for all humanity that try as I might, I still cried like a baby. What makes the book so good? Well, the story was pretty tight and Dickens kept the action moving. There were still interesting characters and some humor. Lots of loose threads were skillfully brought together at the end.Sydney Carton was great as the neer-do-well turned hero. In fact I liked almost all the characters, a lot, except Madame Defarge. Brrrr..... I loved what happened to her. I prefer happy endings but it's a great story.

Date Posted: 2/25/2010 9:13 AM ET
Member Since: 10/14/2007
Posts: 2,090
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Last Edited on: 3/8/10 7:04 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Kat (polbio) -
Date Posted: 2/25/2010 7:37 PM ET
Member Since: 10/10/2008
Posts: 3,067
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Like I said earlier my 10 year old read the illustrated classics version. As I was discussing it with her, I found that she wasnt getting all the imagery and symbolism. Int he beginning they talked about the "ghost" of Lucy's father. Shetook it literally as he were dead, and Lucy was being haunted. I had to explain that they meant he wasntlike he was before his imprisonment. When she read the ending she didnt get the significance of Sydney's sacrifice. When I explained it to her, she started bawling. I hadnt expected that. I mean, yes, I have cried through it each time I have read the book, but it hit her hard. I felt bad. But she went to school and did her book report. She said the teacher was impresssed she had read it.

Date Posted: 3/1/2010 6:30 PM ET
Member Since: 5/18/2008
Posts: 123
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Why, why, why? says I

Tell me more, I beg you. What's it about. No, don't just say it was about the French Rev. I know that! Why was it shiver worthy?

Well, first of all...I love anything Dickens. But in this story particularly there's a shivery mood throughout the whole thing...the themes, the characters...Madame Defarge and Sydney Carton in particular were the most shivery people in it...one in a good way, the other bad. :-D I can't really describe it adequately. It just has a delightfully overcast feeling...and the ending is suPERB.

Date Posted: 3/2/2010 12:13 PM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2009
Posts: 25,000
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Madame Defarge and Sydney Carton in particular were the most shivery people in it...one in a good way, the other bad. :-D

Well, shiver me timbers. Sounds wonderful!

I can't really describe it adequately. It just has a delightfully overcast feeling...

I've read only the first few pages. It is shivery. Particularly this:

"It is likely enough, that rooted in the woods of France and Norway, there were growing trees, when that sufferer was put to death, already marked by the woodman, Fate, to come down and be sawn into boards, to make a certain movable framework with a sack and a knife in it, terrible in history. "

That really creeped me out. Imagine hiking through the woods and passing--or maybe picnicking--under treesdestined to be turned into the guillotine.



Last Edited on: 3/3/10 4:14 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 3/5/2010 6:39 PM ET
Member Since: 5/18/2008
Posts: 123
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The whole beginning, "Recalled to Life," theme is also very shivery. :-)