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Topic: Thought I'd Lighten Up this Forum a Little

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Subject: Thought I'd Lighten Up this Forum a Little
Date Posted: 10/23/2008 9:02 AM ET
Member Since: 10/20/2007
Posts: 1,680
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While looking for sweatshirts, I came across these.

My two favorites are:

"They tried to Kill Us - We Won - LET'S EAT!!!  and 'Jewish Mothers Running Lives For More Than 3,000 years"

and I'm probably going to order "

"ALTA KOCKER"

 

Date Posted: 10/23/2008 10:40 AM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
Posts: 4,979
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They tried to Kill Us - We Won - LET'S EAT!!! 

I have always loved how my reform congregation embraces this statement. LOL.

Date Posted: 10/23/2008 8:08 PM ET
Member Since: 9/16/2007
Posts: 997
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LOL, I love summing up our history with that one!!  But the Jewish Mothers one is priceless!!!

I have a tote bag that says "I schlep therefore I am," which is very me, especially during campaign season.  But recently I had two goyim in one day ask me what schlep means - no one's ever asked me that before, and as with most Yiddish words, it's really hard to explain!



Last Edited on: 11/1/08 9:23 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 11/1/2008 5:57 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Leo Rosten, in Hooray for Yiddish, says that  shlep comes from the German schleppen: to drag.  When used as a verb, Rosten gives as the first of two definitions: "to drag, pull, lag behind".  Examples: " Don't shlep  these packages, the store can deliver them." Or, "Pick up your feet, don't shlep."   "Queen Elizabeth will shlep along 95 pieces of baggage on her trip here."   (That  last bit appeared in the New York Post  Sept. 29, 1957, according to Rosten.  Rosten also wrote  a book called The Joys of Yiddish.

Personally, when I hear that word "shlep" used, I usually flash on the part in "Auntir Mame" where the playscript actually reads "Agnes shleps  in . . ."  as poor, homely, clueless,  pregnant Agnes (Auntie Mame's secretary) makes her entrance, down the staircase.

If you happen never to have read The Education of H*Y*M*A*N   K*A*P*L*A*N  and/or The Return of H*Y*M*A*N   K*A*P*L*A*N , by Rosten, you're in for a treat.  The encounters between Mr. Kaplan and his classmates in the night school English classes taught by Mr. "Pockheel" (Parkhill) are delightful.  I probably enjoyed these books especially because of having taught English to adult immigrants for several years.

P. S.    Ladies "Down South "  don't shlep, Jeanne----they have "tote boys".   (When I married Ed, I told  him what would be expected of him as my "tote boy".  Of course, that was only a part of his job description . . .) 

Date Posted: 11/1/2008 9:26 PM ET
Member Since: 9/16/2007
Posts: 997
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Ah, but with Yiddish, Bonnie, there's always much more than the definition of a word or phrase, there's the whole set of emotions behind it.  That's what makes it fun!

Date Posted: 11/2/2008 12:47 PM ET
Member Since: 10/20/2007
Posts: 1,680
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My handbook is "The Joys of Yiddish" by Leo Rosten.   When I was a child, my father used to tell jokes all in English until he got to the punch line.   When I would ask for a translation, I couldn't understand what was so funny.    Some meaning is definitely lost in translation, but Rosten does a great job with his stories accompanying the definitions.

Sometimes, just to relax, I'll take a "Rosten" break and always come away with a little bit more peace.

Date Posted: 11/3/2008 5:27 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Hmmmmmm........just wondering if you gals every have occasion to use that lovely Yiddish word, "sitz-fleisch"  ?

One could wish sometimes that our politicians and diplomats (and other nations', too) would have this redoubtable quality.

An example of sitz-fleisch that I like is Pres. Harry Truman, who when he really wanted the concurrence of his 'underlings', would call a conference, and keep it in session until they were desperate to get away.  Harry would outlast everyone else in the room and thereby, have his way!

A "Rosten break" is a really neat little idea.

Date Posted: 11/3/2008 9:49 PM ET
Member Since: 7/10/2007
Posts: 170
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I always translated Sitz-fleisch as patience. As in my grandma telling me to hold still, you have no sitz fleish!

Date Posted: 11/13/2008 8:51 AM ET
Member Since: 10/20/2008
Posts: 4
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My sister in law got me a sweatshirt for the holidays that says "OY To The World"
Date Posted: 11/14/2008 3:15 PM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
Posts: 4,979
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ROFL, Gail!  Thanks for sharing!

Date Posted: 11/14/2008 5:55 PM ET
Member Since: 10/20/2007
Posts: 1,680
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Last Edited on: 1/18/09 12:15 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 11/17/2008 10:45 AM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
Posts: 4,979
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HI Phyllis,

Thanks for sharing that.  I will never forget my grandmother telling me that story.  I used to talk to her every Sunday morning, and I'll never forget how she relayed her awe at them stopping her from buying wine.  After all, at 92 years old, it's not like she could ever pass for underage!  She laughed it off, but I think underneath she was ticked off, and rightfully so.  I personally think it's cruel to make a 92 year old without their own means of transportation sit around in Publix for an hour for no good reason.

My grandmother passed away almost 3 years ago now, and my Aunt (her DIL) passed away almost a year ago.  I still miss them both terribly.  My uncle's birthday is this Wednesday.  I put a card out in the mail to him this morning and will call him on Wednesday.   Neither his wife nor his parents are still alive, but at least he will hear from his children, nieces, and nephews.

Judy H. (Judyh) - ,
Subject: Yiddish
Date Posted: 1/27/2009 8:48 PM ET
Member Since: 12/21/2005
Posts: 8
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I had a co-worker run into my office the other day saying "I learned a new word today!   Mishigas!"  She said she couldn't wait to tell me, because she was sure I'd know what it meant.  She probably heard it on NPR :)    I did of course, and gave her a bunch of examples of how it can be used.  That happens to me alot, I think I'm the only outwardly Jewish person most of my co-workers know!  Oy!  I use my "Joys of Yiddish" frequently also, such a great resource book.

Date Posted: 2/1/2009 3:54 PM ET
Member Since: 9/16/2007
Posts: 997
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LOL Judy!!  And welcome to the forum!

Date Posted: 2/2/2009 7:03 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Don't any of you ever have a day (like I do) when you feel like getting and wearing a tee or sweatshirt that says in BIG letters " F E H !"  ?

Date Posted: 2/8/2009 7:41 AM ET
Member Since: 10/20/2007
Posts: 1,680
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"F E H" comes out of my mouth at least once a day - more recently with the shows on television.  - FEH