Book Reviews of The Time Machine and The Invisible Man (Barnes Noble Classics Series) (BN Classics Mass Market)

The Time Machine and The Invisible Man (Barnes  Noble Classics Series) (BN Classics Mass Market)
The Time Machine and The Invisible Man - Barnes Noble Classics Series - BN Classics Mass Market
Author: H.G. Wells
ISBN-13: 9781593080327
ISBN-10: 1593080328
Publication Date: 8/1/2003
Pages: 288
Rating:
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 22

3.9 stars, based on 22 ratings
Publisher: Barnes Noble
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

5 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Time Machine and The Invisible Man (Barnes Noble Classics Series) (BN Classics Mass Market) on + 10 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This is an excellent classic that can introduce you to the world of Science Fiction. It's an easy read and everyone should take the time to read this master.
reviewed The Time Machine and The Invisible Man (Barnes Noble Classics Series) (BN Classics Mass Market) on + 49 more book reviews
Another lovely couple of stories by the genius writer, H.G. Wells. I had to read these two after reading War of the Worlds, and i was not disapointed. Great read.
reviewed The Time Machine and The Invisible Man (Barnes Noble Classics Series) (BN Classics Mass Market) on
Ahead of his time. Two great stories in one book.
reviewed The Time Machine and The Invisible Man (Barnes Noble Classics Series) (BN Classics Mass Market) on + 160 more book reviews
Two excellent science fiction classics by H. G. Wells. Electrifying!
reviewed The Time Machine and The Invisible Man (Barnes Noble Classics Series) (BN Classics Mass Market) on + 162 more book reviews
First, the Time Machine. I think it's considered important because this is where science fiction began to have IMPORTANT MESSAGES about society.

I hate science fiction that has IMPORTANT MESSAGES. I do, nevertheless, thank H.G. Wells for writing this, without which we may not have had The Terminator series of movies nor Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure.

Now on to The Invisible Man. Who authorized a book about an invisible man that doesn't even have one scene in a women's locker room? And it's not because it's all serious, either - Wells has lots of slapstick scenes with tripping and injuries that are supposed to be funny (but aren't).

Also, it never occurred to anybody to keep plenty of flour about, for throwing when the invisible man was around?

Yes, I'm responding on the wrong level - with pragmatic complaints about a philosophical thesis. But, really, I'm comfortable placing these with Frankenstein and Dracula - works that are more important for the cultural touchstones they left behind than for reading in their own right.