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Topic: Totally digging on self published ebooks

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Subject: Totally digging on self published ebooks
Date Posted: 2/18/2012 9:38 PM ET
Member Since: 10/30/2006
Posts: 8,426
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I was simply screwing around on B&N today, making sure everything that could be was on my Nook wishlist and stumbled on two long time WL books that had been published by boutique publishers with very limited distribution. Both have now been self published and availlable at B&N and they were both 17+ in paper and 3.19 in Nook format!!!! Score!!! They made another royalty with me buying a new copy and I saved $14 each- or more realistically, am getting to read 2 books I likely wouldn't have spent 17 dollars each on.

Cool! BTW, they were both published by the same slef publishing company. I wonder if there's a way to tell that company who else I'd lke to have.

Date Posted: 2/18/2012 10:58 PM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2005
Posts: 7,977
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Cool! BTW, they were both published by the same slef publishing company. I wonder if there's a way to tell that company who else I'd lke to have.

If you can find them on the internet, wouldn't hurt to send them a nice note.

But I think you'd be better off going to the individuatl authors you want to see back in print and letting them know. Problem is, Author's can't self-print even their out of print books if they don't own the rights. And one publisher can't print a book another publisher has the copyright to without permission. Which a lot of publishers seem to be sitting on the ebook rights. They don't want to put them out as ebooks themselves, but won't release the rights so the author can do it. So even if they wanted to, many authors can't.

It can be complicated.

Here.

For example, "Julie of the Wolves" is being released by a publisher with authorization from the author. But they're being sued now by Harper Collins, who wants to argue in court that even though their contract didn't specify ebooks, (1971, when ebooks weren't a format yet) that the way it's worded they own all rights to it. (Even if they aren't interested in publishing it in that format.)

I don't think they'll win, president in this is that judgements go in favor of the author when a format isn't specified specifically, but now it's something they all have to deal with.

And some publishers/authors just don't want to go there.



Last Edited on: 2/18/12 10:59 PM ET - Total times edited: 2