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Topic: Up-Side-Down Pots

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Subject: Up-Side-Down Pots
Date Posted: 2/22/2008 6:53 AM ET
Member Since: 10/3/2006
Posts: 6,234
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Does anyone out there have any experience with the Topsy-Turvy tomatoe pots?  You hang them and then grow your tomatoes up-side-down.  I just ordered and received a couple and I'd be interested to know about your results. 

Date Posted: 2/22/2008 9:09 AM ET
Member Since: 4/5/2007
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Seen them but never had one. I'd be interested on how it goes with you. Keep us informed as they grow.
Date Posted: 2/22/2008 6:55 PM ET
Member Since: 6/24/2006
Posts: 786
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;) I just saw that ad and was thinkging I'd try it. Unfortunately, I don't have enough direct sunlight.

Betcha get something off of them....

Date Posted: 2/22/2008 7:35 PM ET
Member Since: 10/3/2006
Posts: 6,234
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I'm going to cross my fingers and follow their directions word for word - I'll keep you all posted!

Date Posted: 2/22/2008 8:39 PM ET
Member Since: 1/31/2008
Posts: 8
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I made my own version of this a couple of years ago.  I took a large bucket, cut a hole in the bottom, then hung the bucket from a sturdy shepherd's hook.  Next I put a layer of newspaper inside the bottom of the bucket and cut an X through the paper where the hole was.  Took a cherry tomato seedling and fit it through the X and the hole so that the top of the plant stuck out the bottom of the bucket.  I then filled the bucket with potting soil that had fertilizer already incorporated and gave it a good watering.  Lastly I planted a few marigold seedlings on the top and mulched them well.  I planted the exact same type and size tomato seedling in the regular garden too.  There was no comparison - the one in the garden outgrew the one in the bucket by 4 times at least.  However, I did harvest several cherry tomatoes off the bucket planting, and it was a fun conversation piece.  The grandkids thought it was great!

Good luck with yours katzpawz - I'd like to see what kind of results you get too!

Date Posted: 2/24/2008 6:25 PM ET
Member Since: 10/3/2006
Posts: 6,234
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Fallan, did you have any type of ongoing fertilizing program going?  The directions for these say to fertilize every 2 weeks.  I bet yours looked real pretty with flowers coming out of the top! 

For planting I chose 4 types of Bush tomatoes, specificly for container gardening.  (2 plants per container) Since this is an experiment for me, I'm keeping pretty good records.  I've also got 3 plants.....non-bush type, so they need cages.....in containers on the ground.  They're all Early Girl and are specific to the climate here (So. Cal.) this time of year. A little later on in the season, I'll be planting more types - even a couple of Roma, directly into a raised bed garden, on the ground.  I enjoy canning, and will be putting up spaghetti sauce and chili sauce to sell for holiday $$ again this year.

I also want to plant beans - for freezing.  Canning beans without a pressure cooker can be VERY dangerous!

Katz

Date Posted: 2/26/2008 5:43 AM ET
Member Since: 1/31/2008
Posts: 8
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Katzpawz - I can't remember how often I fertilized my upside-down tomato.  I'm sure I did, but doubt it was every 2 weeks exactly, and I'm sure that will make a difference in production if you can be very consistent with it.

Sounds like you enjoy your garden thoroughly, and in sunny southern Ca. I bet you've already got lots growing.  I'm in zone 6, so while I'm starting some peppers indoors, and some broccoli and cauliflower in wintersown containers, it will be a few weeks yet before I can really dig in the dirt. 

Thanks to y our post, I may just dig out my bucket and plant another upside-down tomato for the grandkids.

Happy gardening!

Date Posted: 4/23/2008 10:58 AM ET
Member Since: 8/15/2006
Posts: 2,669
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My husband & I watched that commercial and he wants to try and make his own version.  The main reason is the past two years we've been getting our tomatoes destroyed by chipmunks.  We figure that if the plant is high enough, there is no way they can reach it.  We used a homemade chipmunk trap last year that is pretty disgusting - it worked but I just don't like seeing drowned chipmunks every time I go into my yard.

Date Posted: 4/26/2008 8:15 PM ET
Member Since: 7/24/2007
Posts: 2,825
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I saw this on tv and my first question was won't the tomatos grow up toward the sun anyhow?

Subject: Upside down tomatoes
Date Posted: 4/27/2008 9:28 PM ET
Member Since: 9/18/2005
Posts: 154
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We have done this with 5 gallon buckets for a few years with just a hole in the bottom of the bucket the size of a  quarter then plug the hold and fill with good dirt put the lid on turn it back over and stick the tomato through the hole and into the dirt.  Water it good and let it set until the plant gets some roots.  Then flip it over and hang it with the lid off.  Then when you go to water it you put the water right into the dirt and it soaks the dirt and comes out the other end.  We have gotten some tomatoes but not near as many as if we had planted it in the garden.  And   yes the plant vines turn up and go up towards the sun.  You have to have a pretty study hook to hold the bucket as it is pretty heavy with all the dirt and water.  We hand our up off a shepherds hook on one corner of our deck. If I knew how to attack a picture to his I would show you a picture.  Anyway takes a lot of water and fertilizer as it runs right through the dirt and back to the ground.

Date Posted: 5/19/2008 3:38 PM ET
Member Since: 1/10/2006
Posts: 2,110
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I'm trying this this year with 2-gallon buckets (the kids painted and then we're hanging them from deck plant hangers) and pepper and baby tomato plants.  We've got them planted, but not hung up yet (they're sitting up a week to make sure the roots get established).  I'm excited to see how it works out!  The boys (7 and 9) really like that it's upside down, too.

 

Phooey on our upside-down family

Date Posted: 6/3/2008 11:03 AM ET
Member Since: 8/15/2006
Posts: 2,669
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We are trying it also.  My husband welded together some very sturdy poles (instead of buying those expensive ones at the garden center) and we have some early girls hanging in buckets.  We also have our regular garden planted because we can't get enough of those summer tomatoes.  I can't wait to see the results!

Date Posted: 6/9/2008 11:11 PM ET
Member Since: 4/8/2008
Posts: 772
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My husband made his own version, too, by using 5 gallon buckets. He put straw on the top to keep the water from running straight through. So far the plants are reaching upwards toward the sun. I don't know what will happen when the stems get too long. I think they may break off, but will wait and see what happens.

I bought one tomato plant that was planted in a hanging planter, not upside down. It is doing fantastic and we have already enjoyed lots of tomatoes from it. Don't have to worry about the salmonela from purchased tomatoes!

Date Posted: 6/11/2008 1:32 PM ET
Member Since: 8/15/2006
Posts: 2,669
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Wow  - how lucky you are!  We don't even have flowers on them yet.  I can't wait to get my first vine-ripened tomato.  The first one is usually eaten like an apple & sprinkled with a touch of salt. 

Date Posted: 6/24/2008 8:43 AM ET
Member Since: 8/15/2006
Posts: 2,669
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Well so far it's no contest. Our upside down tomatoes are not doing as well as our regular garden tomatoes.  They are actually looking pretty pathetic.

Date Posted: 7/8/2008 8:33 PM ET
Member Since: 7/14/2007
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I never had any success with them, but tomatoes are difficult in North Texas whichever way you plant them.

Date Posted: 7/9/2008 1:09 AM ET
Member Since: 9/23/2006
Posts: 6,362
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These look neat but I wondered how you'd keep anything from reaching upwards.  There were some hanging planters and baskets where you planted the sides but it seemed as thought the same thing would happen.  The plants on the sides and bottom would turn up and the effect would be spoiled.

My tomato is right-side up but it did have a tomato that was turning red.  Who knows?

Date Posted: 8/10/2008 12:31 AM ET
Member Since: 6/5/2008
Posts: 230
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I used 2 of these pots this year - and finally gave up on them this week. Was worth a try.
Date Posted: 8/28/2008 10:02 AM ET
Member Since: 8/15/2006
Posts: 2,669
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We have two also.  Both of them have a few small tomatoes that are still green. 

Date Posted: 8/29/2008 1:36 PM ET
Member Since: 9/23/2006
Posts: 6,362
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I'm going to try to do something more decorative next year.  Wish me luck because it's not my thing.  As far as tomatoes, I will be happy if I get a potted plant that produces tomatoes! 

Date Posted: 9/9/2008 8:03 AM ET
Member Since: 8/15/2006
Posts: 2,669
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Out of our 2 upside down 2 plants, we've taken 1 red tomatoe - the rest are still small & green.  Our regular tomato plants are doing so much better and my counter is crammed with big red tomatoes.

Subject: maybe it is a climate thing?
Date Posted: 9/20/2008 1:36 PM ET
Member Since: 5/6/2008
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Up here in seattle, a friend of mine switched to upside down tomatoes (built her own, again, not buying the official ones) and got massively improved yields over in ground; she's on her third  year now.  And they are much easier to harvest.

Subject: definitely climate
Date Posted: 10/10/2008 5:36 AM ET
Member Since: 7/19/2008
Posts: 15,382
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We had a good number of tasty cherry tomatoes this year.   (Two pots upside down.)  But we are in a poor area for tomatoes.  Too many snails and not enough heat.   The upside down actually work better than the ground with our cool weather.