Book Reviews of The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics)

The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics)
The War of the Worlds With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card - Scholastic Classics
Author: H. G. Wells
ISBN-13: 9780439518499
ISBN-10: 0439518490
Publication Date: 3/1/2004
Pages: 304
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 11

4 stars, based on 11 ratings
Publisher: Scholastic
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

31 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Any person that likes science fiction will like this book
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Before there was the movie there was the book. Earth. Mars. War.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 272 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
An excellent book. Much better than the movie.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 160 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
The classic book by H. G. Wells. One hundred times better than the movie.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 5 more book reviews
No wonder people thought the invasion was really happening! Great "period" read!
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 49 more book reviews
Great book by the genius author, H.G. Wells. A must read for anyone into classic science fiction.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 33 more book reviews
Thirty-five million miles into space, a species of Martians set eyes on planet Earth. With their own planet doomed for destruction, the Martians prepare to invade. Their weapons are ready and their aim is ruthless.
The war of the worlds is about to begin.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 5 more book reviews
Gosh I can't believe a guy could write a book about aliens invading in the late 1800s so well, and scary.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 12 more book reviews
From the back cover: "Across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to the beasts, intellects vast and unsympathetic regard Earth with envious eyes, and draw their plans against us..." The massacre of planet Earth

The horror starts on a quiet summer night, with a falling star...and then hundreds: ships filled with repulsive, super-intelligent monsters and war machines deadly beyond even the dreams of military science. The invaders don't want to trade, or talk, or enlighten: they only want to trample humanity beneath them, and take our world for their own. And we can't stop them.

Some call it the War of the Worlds. But it's not a war. It's a mass murder...
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 121 more book reviews
Monsters are invading Earth -- We can't stop them. We can't hurt them. We can't even slow them down.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 5 more book reviews
I couldn't get through it, it was too drawn out..
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 2 more book reviews
It is an amazing story!!! A must read!!! Classic!!!
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 246 more book reviews
a slightly modified retelling of the famous story. Told in a first person narrative. Very descriptive without being scary. OK for kids.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 7 more book reviews
A horror book that chills the spine and makes you hide under the cover at night.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 17 more book reviews
35 million miles into space, a species of martians sets eyes on planet Earth. With their own planet doomed for destruction, the martians prepare to invade. Their weapons are ready and their aim is ruthless. The war of the worlds is about to begin.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 3352 more book reviews
In the first part of the 20th century, the dramatization of this book scared everybody. Considering our contemporary danger of germ warfare this book might just again scare us.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 2292 more book reviews
I downloaded this for free for my Kindle. I have never read this before (I have seen a couple bad movies about it) but was eager to read the original story. Overall I liked the story. I thought parts of it were a bit drawn out and boring; but overall it was definitely worth reading...and much better than any of The War of the Worlds movies I have seen.

The nameless narrator of this book tells about green capsules that fall to Earth. Inside them are strange tripod/octupus like creatures that use a heat-rays to destroy a number of people early on. The book follows the narrator as he struggles through the English countryside trying to make it back to his wife. Then for a while he tells the story of his brother in London and of the second Martian weapon they face, that of a black cloud which instantly kills people. Then the story winds back to the original narrator as he makes his way to London to see the final destruction of the Martians.

Like most classics, this story is most outstanding for the story it told at the time it told it. There are probably better books out there now (Christopher John's Tripod series comes to mind) about alien invasion; but for the time this was a very forward thinking book.

The description in the book is very well done and, it is, for the most part very readable and enjoyable. Wells does an excellent job of creating suspense at certain times in the book. He also does an excellent job at showing humanity both at its best and its worst. It is amazing how inhumane some of the humans in this book behave when they are in a panic. The most colossal tragedies this book show that there is space for great heroics and great evil in a time of mass destruction.

I also enjoyed the irony behind how the Martians finally meet there death; it was suiting and says interesting things about evolution in general.

There were some things I did not like about this book. Some of the parts just went on too long. There is a portion where the narrator spends forever describing every minute aspect of the Martians which was slow, another portion where the narrator is making his way across the countryside that was boring, and the part where the narrator is trapped in a collapsed house seemed to drag on forever. Wells gives great attention to the narrators situation but doesn't ever go outside of the narrators sphere of influence to see what is happening world-wide or what kind of reaction the rest of the world is having. Also the characters were pretty sketchy...this was definitely more of an adventure driven novel than a character driven one.

Should you read it? Well if you like sci-fi and are interested in alien invasion then this is a must; this is pretty much the story that inspired a lot of later sci-fi stories. A lot of the story is very enjoyable, engaging and intriguing; but as with many classics there are portions that drag on a bit. I never found the language or writing difficult to understand, so that means this novel has aged well with time. If you are not a sci-fi fan, interested in post-apocalyptic stories, or alien invasion I would probably skip this in favor of something else.

If you do really like this story and haven't read the Tripods trilogy by Christopher John I recommend that you do; the story is similar in tone, more character driven, and a wonderful read.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 42 more book reviews
The War of the Worlds is a classic science fiction novel, which I had never read. Written in 1898 by H.G. Wells it is the experiences of an unnamed narrator who survives the invasion of Martians in the suburbs of London England. The narrator lives a mile or so from the first landing, and after the first attack he flees with his wife. They separate and he spends the rest of the book trying to find her.
Several parts of the book are his brothers story of escape from London. How he first hears about the invasion and the disbelief of those who do not see the Martians first hand. The Martians are octopus looking creatures that use heat rays and a gas or black smoke to kill the humans. As more Martians land Londoners flee the city and the English flee the country.
At on point in the book the narrator is trapped in a partially ruined building with a curate, an assistant clergyman, whos mind has snapped from stress. While the two men hide from the Martians who are right next door the narrator tries to calm the clergyman to avoid the Martians. When they see the Martians feeding on the humans like we are just big caprie sun containers the curate losses all control and is knocked unconscious by the narrator and found by the Martians.
After several days the Martians depart and the narrator moves towards London. It is in London that the narrator discovers that the Martians have succumb to the bacteria that live on our planet. When the narrator returns home he finds his wife waiting. She had believed him to be dead and vice versa.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 36 more book reviews
This book was as interesting as i have always been told, I dont know what took so long for me to read it.Suspensful, and fun to read, if you like the sci-fi genra! A must read for any avid reader.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 8 more book reviews
This book is more of a higher level book, but a good one none the less.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 552 more book reviews
Complete and unabridged.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 51 more book reviews
I get that this book is more politcal satire and less sci-fi... but the ending blows.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 20 more book reviews
a real hoot.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 10 more book reviews
This is a classic, period.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 52 more book reviews
they came from outer space-Mars to be exact. Nothing seems to stop the and Earth will never be the same.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 7 more book reviews
Never read.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 174 more book reviews
Excellent reading!
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 13 more book reviews
The War of the Worlds is a classic for a reason!
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This is a Barnes & Noble's edition with timeline of Well's life, endnotes, question section and introduction. Good for a student.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 46 more book reviews
Required student reading.
reviewed The War of the Worlds: With an Introduction by Orson Scott Card (Scholastic Classics) on + 6 more book reviews
I have not read this book. This was my sons book.