Book Reviews of Weapons of Choice (Axis of Time Trilogy, Bk 1)

Weapons of Choice (Axis of Time Trilogy, Bk 1)
Weapons of Choice - Axis of Time Trilogy, Bk 1
Author: John Birmingham
ISBN-13: 9780345457127
ISBN-10: 0345457129
Publication Date: 6/1/2004
Pages: 448
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 24

4.1 stars, based on 24 ratings
Publisher: Del Rey
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

7 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Weapons of Choice (Axis of Time Trilogy, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 1
Preparations for the pivotal Battle of Midway in 1942 are interrupted when a multinational task force from 2021 are transported in their midst, with near catastrophic results for both forces. The time travelers and the contemporaries must then deal with the implications for both the people involved, and the larger implications for WWII and beyond. The battles are detailed and realistic, the action is fast moving, and the plot is a nice twist on the alternate reality subgenre of SF. What I particularly enjoy about this book is that the sociological ramifications aren't forgotten amongst the shiny tech talk. How do the white men of the navy and government in 1942 react and adjust to the largely multi-ethnic and gender mixed commanding forces of the 2021 task force? How do the time travelers adjust to ways they perceive as almost-barbaric and ignorant, and how does their mere presence begin to change attitudes? The battles and depiction of historical figures are accurate and entertaining, yes, but this is where the real strength of the series is, in my opinion. It in no way slows down the main action, and it very definitely enhances the world the author is building for us. Highly recommended for fans of Turtledove, Stirling, and Flint.
reviewed Weapons of Choice (Axis of Time Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 11 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
What happens when a Multi-National Navy Fleet from the year 2021 gets sent back to the year 1942? It lands right in the middle of a US NAvy fleet looking for the Japanese fleet. Not only does the author describe action between the different fleets (and subsequently how they work together to fight a common enemy),he also does a great job in depicting the social intercourse between the Navy personnel of tomorrow with the Navy personnel of the future. This is Part 1 of the "Axis of Time Trilogy".
reviewed Weapons of Choice (Axis of Time Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 6 more book reviews
Great futuristic sci-fi book. Great to read before 2008, not spoiling this any more than that.
reviewed Weapons of Choice (Axis of Time Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 16 more book reviews
good book
reviewed Weapons of Choice (Axis of Time Trilogy, Bk 1) on
Overall it is an interesting read. However, there was a section through the middle of the book that was basically useless drivel. Unnecessary details about various plot lines that are never followed up on and don't add anything to the real story in my opinion. The author goes to extreme lengths to display the characters from the 1940's as shallow bigots and the characters from the future as paragons of multiculturalism. Which is fine to a point but quickly gets tiresome as this theme gets hammered on over and over again. My final analysis is that it is a fairly well written and interesting story that could have been pared down a bit.
reviewed Weapons of Choice (Axis of Time Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 235 more book reviews
In the year 2021, a military experiment thrusts an American-led multinational armada back to 1942, right into the middle of the U.S. naval task force speeding toward Midway Atoll. Shock is followed by jubilation at the time travelers' awesome new firepower---this astonishing event will alter the course of World War II and forever change the rules of combat. But have other ships made the trip and fallen into the hands of the Japanese? What happens next is anybody's guess---and everybody's nightmare.
reviewed Weapons of Choice (Axis of Time Trilogy, Bk 1) on + 23 more book reviews
these sort of books tend not to be literary masterpieces, but i enjoy reading them