Book Reviews of A Wedding Bouquet: Something Old / Something New / Something Borrowed / Something Blue / And a Sixpence for Her Shoe

A Wedding Bouquet: Something Old / Something New / Something Borrowed / Something Blue / And a Sixpence for Her Shoe
A Wedding Bouquet Something Old / Something New / Something Borrowed / Something Blue / And a Sixpence for Her Shoe
Author: Patricia Oliver, Patricia Rice, Anne Barbour, Edith Layton, Carla Kelly
ISBN-13: 9780451187857
ISBN-10: 0451187857
Publication Date: 5/1/1996
Pages: 348
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 26

4 stars, based on 26 ratings
Publisher: Signet
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed A Wedding Bouquet: Something Old / Something New / Something Borrowed / Something Blue / And a Sixpence for Her Shoe on + 103 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This is a fun summer read - short wedding stories, excellent for the beach, park, airplane, etc.
reviewed A Wedding Bouquet: Something Old / Something New / Something Borrowed / Something Blue / And a Sixpence for Her Shoe on + 171 more book reviews
Terrific stories, especially by Carla Kelly and Edith Layton. They are always marvelous, and these are no exception.
reviewed A Wedding Bouquet: Something Old / Something New / Something Borrowed / Something Blue / And a Sixpence for Her Shoe on + 1107 more book reviews
The writing in this book is very good; I enjoyed the stories because the authors had unique story lines.

SOMETHING OLD (Patricia Oliver) At the age of 19, Lady Jane Sutherland was a wallflower and Viscount Hammond embarrassed her by avoiding Jane during their promised dance. Years later, they meet again but do not recognize each other. At the masquerade ball celebrating quiet Jane's 30th birthday, she dons her aunt's wedding dress to be the belle of the ball.

SOMETHING NEW (Carla Kelly) This story is in another collection but is a wonderful tale. A young officer, Edmund Parkhill, asks his commander to serve as best man at his wedding. Major John Redpath agrees but needs to find the orphanage recommended for a young refugee they found on the battlefield.

The sister of the bride is a widow (Audrey Winkle) and she welcomes all three (groom, best man and refugee child, Marie). The major is immediately smitten with Audrey; she is taken with Marie and is interested in the Major. The rest of the wedding party (other than Edmund) are not pleased with the arrival of the child. This makes for an unusual and interesting story.

SOMETHING BORROWED (Patricia Rice) This is another unique story. When Damian Langland's bride-to-be leaves him standing at the altar, Jane's handicapped sister Melanie makes an unusual offer; she offers to pay Damian's debts. In return, she wants to see London. Melanie has been smothered by her family and treated like a simpleminded invalid, near death's door. She is not and wants to experience some life.

Damian insists that he marry her, to save her reputation, but Melanie is sure Jane will come to her senses and marry Damian. Once the reader suspends disbelief over a couple of things, this is a delightful story.

SOMETHING BLUE (Edith Layton) This story just did not speak to me.
The friends of the to-be-married soon (two weeks) couple notice that both of the young people seem 'blue' -- or sad. It comes out that Lawrence needs to go home because of severe illness in the family and may miss the wedding date.

June, a pretty girl (but not nearly as beautiful as her actress mother), never believed that she would marry Lawrence. He must be giving her an excuse to cancel the wedding.

AND A SIXPENCE FOR HER SHOE (Anne Barbour) When Andrew Carter left for war 3 years earlier, his betrothed Catherine had an awful fight with the soldier. He refused to read her letters; but took up writing to a young woman employed at Catherine's family manor. When Drew returned, he was devastated to find that she had married another just two weeks before his arrival.

Drew thinks there are serious impediments to a marriage with Catherine: Before he left, she told Drew she hated him; he had come back wounded and scarred from war and Drew thought he was in love with Helen, the woman who wrote to him those three years.