Book Reviews of What is a Jew?

What is a Jew?
What is a Jew
Author: Morris Norman Kertzer
ISBN-13: 9780020863502
ISBN-10: 0020863500
Publication Date: 9/7/1978
Pages: 249
Rating:
  • Currently 4.8/5 Stars.
 2

4.8 stars, based on 2 ratings
Publisher: Collier Books
Book Type: Paperback
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3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed What is a Jew? on + 73 more book reviews
Answers almost every question you could have about the Jewish faith and life.
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From Library Journal
Kertzer, who died in 1984, wrote the first edition of this book in 1953. He revised it three times, most recently in 1978. Now his nephew, also a rabbi and professor at the Hebrew Union College, has revised the book again. Originally intended to "guide non-Jews to a better understanding of their fellow Jewish Americans" as well as to "enable Jews themselves to rediscover forgotten roots of tradition and belief," the book still serves this purpose admirably, addressing all of the traditional questions: What in general do Jews believe? What are Orthodox Jews? What is Torah? Also addressed are newer concerns: What is the Jewish attitude toward feminism? According to Judaism, do animals have rights? Why do Jews persist in remembering the Holocaust? About half the material in this revised edition is new; the entire book is written from a calmly instructional, nonevangelical viewpoint and in an engaging style that will appeal to young people and old, Jews and non-Jews. Highly recommended for all public and school libraries.
- Marcia Welsh, Guilford Free Lib., Ct
reviewed What is a Jew? on + 176 more book reviews
Kertzer, who died in 1984, wrote the first edition of this book in 1953. He revised it three times, most recently in 1978. Now his nephew, also a rabbi and professor at the Hebrew Union College, has revised the book again. Originally intended to "guide non-Jews to a better understanding of their fellow Jewish Americans" as well as to "enable Jews themselves to rediscover forgotten roots of tradition and belief," the book still serves this purpose admirably, addressing all of the traditional questions: What in general do Jews believe? What are Orthodox Jews? What is Torah? Also addressed are newer concerns: What is the Jewish attitude toward feminism? According to Judaism, do animals have rights? Why do Jews persist in remembering the Holocaust? About half the material in this revised edition is new; the entire book is written from a calmly instructional, nonevangelical viewpoint and in an engaging style that will appeal to young people and old, Jews and non-Jews. Highly recommended for all public and school libraries.