Discussion Forums - Questions about PaperBackSwap Questions about PaperBackSwap

Topic: What are library book bindings?

Club rule - Please, if you cannot be courteous and respectful, do not post in this forum.
  Unlock Forum posting with Annual Membership.
Subject: What are library book bindings?
Date Posted: 8/5/2008 6:07 AM ET
Member Since: 7/18/2008
Posts: 1,051
Back To Top

There are a few books posted for wish lists but they're library book bindings & mine are paperbacks. Anyone know what the difference is?

niffir - ,
Date Posted: 8/5/2008 7:51 AM ET
Member Since: 2/13/2008
Posts: 495
Back To Top

I've heard it used 2 different ways.  One is when a book is rebound by a library (like they take a paperback and have it bound with a hardcover or they take a year's worth of magazines and have them bound to make a more durable volume).  These are generally well-done, but aren't particularly beautiful.  The reason for doing it usually is to either make something more durable or to replace a damaged cover-- functional rather than for aestheic reasons.  The other use of the term library binding is one that is done by the publisher.  In this case, hardcover books are bound with a cover that has the title and cover illustration and everything printed on it.  There's no dustjacket, and all the information that would have appeared on the dust jacket is printed on the book cover itself.  The covers are generally highly shiny-- they look a lot like a paperback but are hardcover.  If library binding is showing up associated with an ISBN, then it is likely this sort of library binding from the publisher.  The rebindings would only apply to individual books that were rebound by an individual library.

Date Posted: 8/5/2008 8:18 AM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2007
Posts: 4,058
Back To Top

I had a Bertrice Small book on my shelf one time that was about the size of an average paperback - maybe a bit thicker - that was marked as a library binding.  It was a small hardcover book, with the same cover art as the paperback.  It was also printed right on the hardcover & had no dustjacket.  I've seen other books like this too, though not a lot of them, and several of them were in libraries at the time.

Date Posted: 8/5/2008 9:28 AM ET
Member Since: 6/4/2007
Posts: 2,941
Back To Top

I've always understood "Library Binding" to mean the re-bound copies the libraries have.  A book that's no different from a regular copy but has plastic and stickers would still just be a regular copy, I think.  The actually binding isn't specifically "library" in that case, but when the book is re-bound by the library it is.  I have a few books like what Kim described, where either the cover is printed directly onto hardcover or it seems as if a cover has been glued there, and they all have the same type of cover material as well as the same white stamped title along the spine.  They're all former library books so I'm pretty sure that's it.

It's an important distinction...I recently ordered a book listed as a hardcover that was by a particular publisher known for their beautifully bound books and received one of these re-bound library books instead.  It was a tremendous disappointment (as were the underlining and torn pages) and I definitely wouldn't have requested it had the book been properly listed as a "Library Binding"

Date Posted: 8/5/2008 11:49 AM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2007
Posts: 4,058
Back To Top

I don't think the one I had was a rebound paperback.  The type was slightly larger and darker, and it was printed on higher quality paper like most hardcovers are.  It very much fit the second description Jennifer gave:

"In this case, hardcover books are bound with a cover that has the title and cover illustration and everything printed on it.  There's no dustjacket, and all the information that would have appeared on the dust jacket is printed on the book cover itself.  The covers are generally highly shiny-- they look a lot like a paperback but are hardcover."

That pretty accurately describes my book, and it had an ISBN number.  I assume these are expressly made for library use?



Last Edited on: 8/5/08 11:50 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 8/5/2008 2:24 PM ET
Member Since: 9/23/2006
Posts: 6,362
Back To Top

I'm not so sure about this.  At one time I wanted to buy Elizabeth Goudge's "The Little White Horse" in hardback.  The only one I could find at that time (80's or early 90's maybe?) was listed as a library binding and cost quite a bit.  It's not here now but it didn't have a dustjacket. 

I assumed that was the edition for libraries too.

Date Posted: 8/5/2008 3:34 PM ET
Member Since: 2/12/2008
Posts: 4,470
Back To Top

I saw a site where the brand new Harry Potter books could be bought with a library binding. I think the pages are supposed to be thicker and instead of a glued spine, the pages are folded & sewn into the binding, making them more durable for many reads.

Date Posted: 8/5/2008 3:42 PM ET
Member Since: 6/19/2008
Posts: 6
Back To Top

Not all Library bound books are 'rebinds.' I sell books to schools and libraries that have original library bindings by the publisher. Generally, those library-bound books have no dust jackets (the cover art is printed on the front), they have sewn (rather than glued) bindings, and they have stronger paper on the inside covers. The pages are acid-free too.

Some books that are rebound by jobbers for libraries are hard to read because a portion of the page gets "swallowed' up in the center. Watch for that.

--Allison

Date Posted: 8/5/2008 4:46 PM ET
Member Since: 9/21/2006
Posts: 2,789
Back To Top

The hard cover lemony snicket books are listed as library binding.  they have the info printed right onto the cover and have a cloth covered spine.

Date Posted: 8/5/2008 6:56 PM ET
Member Since: 2/15/2006
Posts: 284
Back To Top

I work in a public library and to us library binding is a type of binding that we pay extra from the publisher. It's a book bound in accordance with the standards of the American Library Association, it should have strong endpapers, pages sewn with four-cord thread and is able to stand up to the hard use a library book may be subjected to. It usually also doesn't come with a dust jacket but has the art printed on the cover. In the past, they often had those incredibly ugly yellow/organge/turquoise fabric covers with only the title and author printed on them.

susan/vt

Date Posted: 8/5/2008 8:25 PM ET
Member Since: 6/4/2007
Posts: 2,941
Back To Top

Mad props to to Allison for the use of the word 'jobbers'!

Anyone know where I can get my hands on some of those sewn-binding Potters???

Date Posted: 8/5/2008 9:45 PM ET
Member Since: 2/12/2008
Posts: 4,470
Back To Top

"Anyone know where I can get my hands on some of those sewn-binding Potters??? "

I think I might have seen them over at Amazon. Or you might try the Scholastic site, which is the HP publisher.