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Topic: What's everyone reading in April?

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Subject: What's everyone reading in April?
Date Posted: 4/6/2013 2:18 PM ET
Member Since: 11/18/2009
Posts: 551
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I like to keep several books going at a time, so I'm still working my way through a couple classics--Mill on the Floss (George Eliot's most readable work, in my opinion) and Dickens'  Bleak House (am savoring this one!).

What is everyone else reading?

                                                                               Rose

                                                                          

 

Date Posted: 4/7/2013 2:31 PM ET
Member Since: 6/19/2007
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I'm on a Wodehouse binge (have been since January) so I always have one lying around to dip into between my other books. Nothing cheers me up better than Wodehouse. I have Anna Karenina coming in soon at the library so that might be my next classics challenge book.
Date Posted: 4/7/2013 2:39 PM ET
Member Since: 11/18/2009
Posts: 551
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I haven't read a Wodehouse in many years. I should give him another try!

Ann Karenina is one of my failures (so far), having tried to read it a few times, and giving up. (Yet the plot line interests me, and it's so famous I really should know about it.)

                                                                                                                                                                  Rose

Subject: April reading/Wodehouse
Date Posted: 4/7/2013 6:10 PM ET
Member Since: 9/14/2009
Posts: 611
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I recently finished an audiobook I downloaded from Internet Archive/Librivox of Wodehouse's 'Three Men and a Maid'. It was hilarious! He wrote a lot of really great stuff besides his Jeeves & Wooster books!

Date Posted: 4/13/2013 5:43 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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I'm reading To The Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf, as my "feminist lit" category selection for the 2013 Challenge (Lite).  The first work of hers that I read

was Mrs.Dalloway.   I think one has to have read that book in order to get the full import of the story Michael Cunningham set out in The Hours.  The

second work by Ms Woolf that I read was A Room of One's Own.  After I posted it here on  PBS, it was requested by a young woman who was beginning

college that fall.  She had the reading list for her Women's Studies class, and it included "the annotated edition" (which my copy was).

Not long ago, I read about the anniversary of Betty Friedan's book about "the problem that has no name", The Feminine Mystique.   It hit me pretty

hard to think that it was  FIFTY years ago that it was first published! 

My first 2013 Challenge choice was The Idiot, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky.  It sure was a "chewy" novel, as a prof I knew used to call literary works that

oblige the reader to mull over what the author writes.    After reading it, I got the Cliff Notes from the public library, and read them, and am glad

I did so.  (It was good advice you gave me, Obsessed  R.)

 

 

 



Last Edited on: 4/13/13 5:50 PM ET - Total times edited: 6
Date Posted: 4/14/2013 7:16 AM ET
Member Since: 11/18/2009
Posts: 551
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Bonnie, thanks for reminding me about the Cliff Notes method (to read them after finishing the book). I have a few classes I'll be teaching over the next several months, and I'm going to follow that plan myself (there are always useful details!).

                                                                                                                                             Rose

Date Posted: 4/18/2013 3:18 PM ET
Member Since: 9/25/2006
Posts: 314
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A Classic Children's/Young Adult title: The Animal Story Book - Andrew Lang. Victorian pretty-pretty, lots of whimsy

Re-read a Classic: The Golovlyov Family – Shchedrin. The grimmest Russian novel as antidote to whimsy

Classic whodunit: Playback – Raymond Chandler. His last one, fleshed out from a filmscript
 

Date Posted: 4/23/2013 2:48 PM ET
Member Since: 5/31/2009
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Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy by John LeCarre for the Espionage category.  Didn't get to it last month.

 



Last Edited on: 4/23/13 2:51 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 4/23/2013 5:06 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Only a hundred and sixty-one years behind, now, in my reading!    I've  fished out the paperback Uncle Tom's Cabin, or "Life Among the Lowly,  from my

library (bulging bookcases in the garage).   It's 477 pages long, but it won't be tedious reading.  One thing I'm finding interesting is the way Mrs. Stowe

tried to transcribe onto the printed page the way people talked, back then (1851-52).  Sometimes I try reading aloud some of the dialogue, and, to my

ear,  it does, indeed, sound like someone speaking a "Southern" dialect of English.   I haven't seen the recent film about President Lincoln, yet, but

intend to do so.  But I want to read  this American classic first.  I don't know why I didn't read this book before now . . . .

 



Last Edited on: 4/23/13 5:08 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 4/29/2013 5:12 PM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
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Last Edited on: 2/8/15 12:53 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 5/2/2013 3:15 PM ET
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Last Edited on: 2/8/15 12:50 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Subject: April selection
Date Posted: 5/5/2013 7:54 PM ET
Member Since: 11/15/2011
Posts: 56
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I just finished A Russian Journal by John Steinbeck for my travel category.  He documented his 1947 visit to Russia.  It's a book about the people, not about politics.  The people he encountered were hospitable, strong, and resilient even in areas devastated by war.  He visited Moscow, Stalingrad, Kiev, collective farms in Ukraine, various places in Georgia including a state-run tea farm and Stalin's birthplace.  Steinbeck found travel arrangements and government beauracracy were  frustrating in postwar Russia, but it's the stories about the people that make this book a gem.  I'm glad I read it!  

Date Posted: 5/6/2013 1:35 PM ET
Member Since: 9/25/2006
Posts: 314
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I finsihed The Animal Story Book by Andrew Lang. In the late 19th century, Scottish author, poet, and scholar Lang had fairy, folk, and animal tales translated from writers such as Pliny, Alexandre Dumas, and Théophile Gautier. Then, he commissioned artists to create pretty black and white drawings. The collections were madly popular, probably influencing the reading tastes and habits of children and young people of the early 20th century. Lang, a romantic Victorian-era folklorist, chose good stories and edited the translation in such a way that the language is simple, direct, clear, and coherent. Like Lemony Snicket, he includes copious – that’s a fifty-cent way to say “many” or “numerous” - hard words that young readers do well to learn.