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Topic: What's everyone reading in September, 2013?

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Subject: What's everyone reading in September, 2013?
Date Posted: 9/3/2013 7:33 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Well, I reluctantly turned the page on the calendar, to September (already!?) even though I am not ready to say summer is over . . .

However, my reading has taken an interesting turn . . . I am well into Moon Tiger, by Penelope Lively.  An acquaintance who participates in a reading circle in New York City led me to it.   Before 'English' authors, the group was reading authors of the Iberian peninsula---Javier Marias, José Saramago, and Merce Rororeda.  Now, with Moon Tiger, group members will be taking a look at English authors.  I decided to 'tag along', in a way, since I had never encountered any other readers of The Time of the Doves, by the Catalonian writer Merce Rororeda, until I learned of the NYC group's selection of that title.  I read Doves a couple of years ago on the recommendation of a woman friend who had just returned from a trip to Barcelona.   And I know that Saramago received the Nobel Prize for Literature a few years ago, thus joining the list of authors I hope yet to sample. I don't know who is in the NYC reading group, but its selections strike me as especially interesting.  So, even though I've no one with whom to discuss the book out here in the Upper Midwest, I'm gonna read the book anyhow.

Date Posted: 9/6/2013 1:30 PM ET
Member Since: 9/25/2006
Posts: 314
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I'm reading Byron Farwell's biography of the victorian era travel writer, Sir Richard Burton. And while doing that I'm reading Burton's huge books about East and Central Africa. I think studying dozens of languages rather turned Burton's brain because his books are king-sized unmade beds - opinions, ideas, assertions, and half-baked theories are piled up on observations and facts which cover casual racism and petty meanness.He was writing to would-be explorers so there is a lot of skippable material on prices of beads for trade.......

Date Posted: 9/7/2013 9:52 AM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
Posts: 2,619
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There was a period when The British had a fascination with finding the source of the Nile. There are tons of books written by explorers who made the attempt. Of course many died. Many were sick. Another river in Africa the Niger has some interesting names associated with its exploration. Mungo Park went twice and disappeared the 2nd time never to be heard of again. An interesting side note to Mungo is his brother. I think his name was Robert. He was the first winner of the British Open golf championship when that tournament was started.

Date Posted: 9/7/2013 10:27 AM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
Posts: 2,619
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I think The Shadow of the Wind is set in Barcelona. Have you read that. I really enjoyed The Club Dumas by Reverte. Some people object to the ending but I don't think it disturbs my enjoyment even though it is a little over the top.

Date Posted: 9/9/2013 7:48 AM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
Posts: 2,619
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For Whom the Bell Tolls by E Hemingway

Tinisima by  Elena Poniatowska. some of this book takes place during the Spanish Civil War.

Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell. non fiction.

Date Posted: 9/26/2013 6:23 PM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
Posts: 318
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Last Edited on: 2/7/15 3:24 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 9/26/2013 7:07 PM ET
Member Since: 5/4/2009
Posts: 87
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I'm still reading The Faerie Queene. Today I've started my espionage choice: Ian Flemings' Casino Royale. I'm not really a fan of the Bond movies, but I'm finding the book to be a lot of fun.