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Topic: where are all the real mystery/thrillers

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Subject: where are all the real mystery/thrillers
Date Posted: 4/29/2010 7:51 PM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2008
Posts: 10,417
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whoops, hit the button too soon!

I am seriously wondering why I never read about  the good old mysteries and thrillers on this forum. Everything seems to be about "cozies" lately and, I'm sorry, I can only take so much of the cozies. Am I missing these  M/T threads?

I just finished "the Girl who Kicked the Hornet's Nest" and it was a real page turner. It didn't have as much of the descriptions of locale and characters as I normally like, but it was a mystery!  Where are all of the members who enjoy these books as much as I do? I sometimes think that we are a dying breed.



Last Edited on: 4/29/10 7:58 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 4/30/2010 7:04 AM ET
Member Since: 2/27/2008
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I may be a bit of a weenie lately, but with the news and our finances I can't take as much murder and mayhem as I normally would. I used to love a good serial killer, and probably will again, when my stress level decreases! Debbie

Date Posted: 4/30/2010 7:50 AM ET
Member Since: 8/24/2005
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I'm with Debbie, if I want to delve into mayhem all I have to do is pick up the newspaper or call someone in my family.

However, I know exactly what you mean about cozies, after a few of them you want something more substantial.  I have found that several historical series strike a nice balance between cozies and the hard-boiled gritty stories.  I've been reading the Mark Twain series by Peter Heck and the Susanna Gregory about a medieval doctor in Oxford. And Jacqueline Winspear's Maisie Dobbs series is a serious look at post-World War I England.  Sometimes I grab a Jane Haddam and re-read it, her Gregor Demarkian stories are complex and sometimes downright byzantine.

Kat (polbio) -
Date Posted: 4/30/2010 8:11 AM ET
Member Since: 10/10/2008
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I love Historical Mysteries and this past year got into spy thrillers (Steve Berry, Tom Clancy, etc). I dont like Horror books so dont go for the gruesome, but I love some thing with action. I dont read many cozies, other than Agatha Christie.  My mom gives me a lot of them, but I would rather read a more substantial book.  Cozies are nice when you want a quick simple book that doesnt require a lot of thought. 

Date Posted: 4/30/2010 10:25 AM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2008
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LOL Aubrey - that must be quite the family you have there! I agree with you folks about the historical mysteries and I am not a big fan of Horror either. I just like a real mystery from time to time that keeps me turning the pages; that grabs me from page 1 (or 2). I am always on the lookout for these, but I have read so little about them that I feared very few people were reading them - or posting about them on this forum.

I really like the foreign mysteries for the  most part because there seems to be so much more character and plot development. I also like the descriptions of locale and culture. Stephen Booth is one of my favorites and of course, Rennie Airth (who says he will be coming out with another John Madden book). Arnaldur Indridason is another - Iceland is his territory.

Jo Nesbo intrigues me, but I haven't read any of her books yet - have any of you on this forum? I would love to hear about any really good M/T's that anyone has read or suggests!smiley

Date Posted: 4/30/2010 10:55 AM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2009
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I read very few cozies myself. I split my reading time between suspense and romance. Lately I have read Carl Hiaasen's Lucky You, which was hilarious as usual in a strange twisted way. I read Greg Isle's The Devil's Punchbowl which was awesome. I read Jeff Deaver's The Devil's Teardrop and of course he never writes a bad book and it had me on the edge of my seat. I start Lee Child's Gone Tomorrow today. :-)

Date Posted: 4/30/2010 9:39 PM ET
Member Since: 7/2/2006
Posts: 40
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I read a few cozies, but I really enjoy the mystery/thriller/suspense.  Right now, I am reading THE CRIME WRITER by Gregg Hurwitz.  This is the first I have read of his, and I am having a hard time with his writing style.  I am not sure why, but it seems very choppy.  I am on page 50, and it just hasn't sucked me in yet. 

I just finished reading DEEPER THAN THE DEAD by Tami Hoag.  I think I have only read one of her other books, but I enjoyed this one.  I also really liked THE BONE GARDEN by Tess Gerritsen. 

I also like a good serial killer (in a book, of course).  I just haven't been reading too much lately.  My job is taking way too much of my reading time!!  Once school is out, I'll be reading more. 

Date Posted: 4/30/2010 10:17 PM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2008
Posts: 10,417
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I read the first 2 or 3 of Tami Hoag's books and really liked them. I haven't read any recently though - maybe I should get back to them. I also read a few of Tess Gerritsen's and they were also good. Maybe I've just developed an affinity for the foreign writers - or maybe that's just been my mood lately! 

Aubrey, if you haven't read "I Kill" by Giorgio Faletti, I strongly recommend it. My only problem with him is that this is his only book so far which has been translated into English. It leaves you with wanting to read more of his books and they aren't there!frown

Date Posted: 5/1/2010 6:45 AM ET
Member Since: 8/10/2005
Posts: 4,600
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I like mysteries from all the various sub-genres from classic Agatha Christie to serial killer chases and forensic mystery to police procedurals to bumbling amateur sleuths to hard-boiled detective mysteries to humorously toned mysteries to tea-shop cozies. I'm not a huge cozy fan, although there are a few pleasant series I keep up with and I still try out cozy series occasionally because you never know when an author or character will strike a chord within you and you'll find one you enjoy. Most of them are so much cookie cutter copies of one another that they're hard to tell apart though. Of course, the same can be said for so-called thrillers...most of those I've tried recently have left me just yawning.

I like what I like, regardless of what sub-genre it's from. Who would guess that I would enjoy The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency just as much as I enjoy Dexter? LOL Historical and foreign mysteries are two of my favorite sub-genres, and I tend to read stuff that's off the beaten track a bit...gave up on most of the blockbuster best-sellers years ago, with a few exceptions--I'm still reading Sue Grafton's series, for example.

Jeanne, btw, Jo Nesbo is male! Sometimes it's hard to tell with those furrin' names. devil

Cheryl

Alice J. (ASJ) - ,
Date Posted: 5/1/2010 8:11 AM ET
Member Since: 5/13/2009
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For mysteries I like historical, cozy and paranorma and occasionally a straight up mystery. I hate blood and guts so I don't like gruesome mysteries.

Alice

Date Posted: 5/1/2010 10:11 AM ET
Member Since: 12/19/2007
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What Spuddie said!

Date Posted: 5/1/2010 10:19 AM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2008
Posts: 10,417
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Cheryl - thanks for setting me straight on Jo Nesbo. I agree with you about enjoying a variety of M/T's. I've read a few cozies as  well, and have enjoyed them - but not for a steady diet.

Date Posted: 5/1/2010 7:21 PM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2009
Posts: 2,920
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Audrey, Hurwitz has some fantastic books out there, but Crime Writer is not one of my favs. You might give Do No Harm a try or his Tim and Dray Rackley series is the bomb. The Kill Clause is the first one and prepare youself it is a hard to take first book, but if you can stay with Tim and Dray are a wonderful couple.

Date Posted: 5/1/2010 8:47 PM ET
Member Since: 4/4/2009
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What is a cozy?

Date Posted: 5/1/2010 8:57 PM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2008
Posts: 10,417
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Here you go, John. This is from another thread in this forum:

Here's a definition from About.com: Cozies are mystery novels typically set in English [or American] country houses, small towns, villages, or other benign environments. Cozies feature very little violence, aside from the murder, and few gory details. The term arose from the relatively genteel settings, the common use of amateur sleuths as protagonists, and the fact that all loose ends are tied up and the villain caught and punished by the novel's conclusion. Agatha Christie's Jane Marple novels typify the subgenre. Normally, there is not a lot of foul language or sex in cozies.

Someone has said that a true cozy mystery has to have a cat in it. :-) My own definition is that it's a mystery I can read right before I go to bed and I won't have nightmares.

 

Here's a good definition of a cozy mystery: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E0CE4DC103BF93BA25753C1A964958260&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=print

And I used to think it was a covering for a teapot!!!



Last Edited on: 5/1/10 8:58 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 5/2/2010 6:37 PM ET
Member Since: 3/4/2008
Posts: 1,673
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I think I qualify as a real mystery/thriller reader!  Jeanne, I have read Jo Nesbo and I love his books (waiting on The Snowman - preordered from bookdepository!), here are some other foreign authors (and I've probably mentioned some of these to you before) Stuart MacBride, Craig Russell (I just finished #5, it is on my shelf,  in the Jan Fabel series) and he as a new series out - The Lennox series,    Mo Hayder, Tom Cain (only read one so far),  Lee Weeks (graphic and intense writing, kind of difficult subject matter), Neil White (all 3 on my shelf), Steven Dunne (only read one so far),  Zoe Sharp (having trouble finding some of them, tho) and I just finished the 1st in the series by Grace Monroe and I absolutely loved it!!!  It is the debut of 2 women authors and it feels like it, too.  It is very good, but you can kind of tell that it was written by 2 people, I getting ready to start #2, so hopefully, they will get it pulled together.  The series is Dark Angels, Bloodline, The Watcher and Broken Hearts...

I'm sure I will think of more!!!

Date Posted: 5/2/2010 6:51 PM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2008
Posts: 10,417
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Well, well, well, I was wondering if you would ever enter this discusson, Carol. I KNOW that you really are a true M/T reader. So glad that you gave me the info on Jo Nesbo -  I'll be looking for his books in the future and will check out some of the others that you've mentioned. Let's hear more of your opinions in this forum!!!cheeky

I wil check out your shelf.....

Date Posted: 5/2/2010 7:59 PM ET
Member Since: 3/4/2008
Posts: 1,673
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....John Macken, Peter Robinson.....

Foreign authors I have on my TBR but haven't gotten to yet: Steve Mosby, G.J. Moffat, Brian McGilloway, Deborah Grabien (I have #2 - 5, but still looking for #1 in the series...anyone?), Val McDermid, Henning Mankell, Ryan David Jahn, James Hayman, Declan Hughes, Mark Pearson, John Burdett....oh, Lord!  This is why I'm not on here much anymore!

Date Posted: 5/2/2010 9:43 PM ET
Member Since: 4/4/2009
Posts: 9,476
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Thanks Jeanne, As I suspected, Elizabeth George and P.D. James don't write cozys.wink

Date Posted: 5/2/2010 9:59 PM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2008
Posts: 10,417
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No, John, they are GREAT mystery authors, but they don't fall into the cozy category! OOH, it's been awhile since I read P.D. James - might be time to pick up one of her books again.....

Kat (polbio) -
Date Posted: 5/3/2010 7:04 AM ET
Member Since: 10/10/2008
Posts: 3,067
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Have any of you read any of the Matthew Pearl books? Loved Dante Club, wasnt crazy about Poe's Shadow. I have his third book THe Last Dickens on my TBR. Also, Ghost Walk by Rebecca Stott is really good. Talking about foreign authors, I liked The Mosaic Crimes by Giulio Leoni. I have some books on my TBR that are foreign authors such as Arturo Perez-Reverte and Luis Miguel Rocha that I plan on reading shortly (they are on my challenge lists).  I havent read most of the "blockbuster" authors such as PD James, John Grisham, Tami Hoag, Greg Ilse, James Deaver, etc. I do like the spy books like Tom Clancy and Steve Berry, but dont like Dan Brown (like the stories not the writing style).

Cheryl, I have the entire set of Sue Grafton books but stopped at D, (or was it E??). I have been reading for the challenges for the past year and a half and havent fit those in. Same with the James Patterson books. I have the entire set of Alex Cross and Women's Murder Club books, but havent read them in a while.



Last Edited on: 5/3/10 4:31 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 5/6/2010 3:09 PM ET
Member Since: 1/9/2006
Posts: 760
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I used to read pretty much nothing but a good thriller.  But the older I get, the less I want to read something that intense because life is just too full of ugliness sometimes.  I do however still toss a good thriller in every now and then. 

 

I love the Julia Spencer Fleming books.  They seem to strike a good balance between being a well written mystery without too much blood and gore.  

Date Posted: 5/6/2010 4:09 PM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2009
Posts: 2,920
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Oh I love her books Melani, she just doesn't write quick enough, but I would rather them come out as slow and well written, rather than sloppy and fast. I don't know about, but I am in need of Clare and Russ fix.

Date Posted: 5/6/2010 4:27 PM ET
Member Since: 2/25/2007
Posts: 13,991
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I'm with the OP. I love love crime/political/weird science thrillers or mysteries. A new author I just found is Jonathan Maberry, who has a "hero" in a secret gov. agency that deals with weird science threats---things like bioengineering and bioterrorism. Then there are David Rollins and James Rollins, John Sandford, Lee Child....seems like the genre just keeps growing.

I do have one issue with it, though, which I've created a new thread for.

I'm not a cozy fan at all; kind of like eating cotton candy. But at least there seems to be no shortage of the kind I do like at the library!

Date Posted: 5/7/2010 8:09 AM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2009
Posts: 2,920
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Betty, have you read James Swain? His Midnight Rambler book was awesome! His Tony Valentine character is in cozy format, but his new charachter John isn't. He is in MR.

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