Book Reviews of Wind Tamer

Wind Tamer
Wind Tamer
Author: P.R. Morrison
ISBN-13: 9781582347813
ISBN-10: 1582347816
Publication Date: 9/19/2006
Pages: 336
Reading Level: Ages 9-12
Rating:
  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
 4

5 stars, based on 4 ratings
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA Children's Books
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Wind Tamer on + 423 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
My nine year old son flew threw this book incredibly fast. He is fascinated by hurricanes so I thought this might be right up his alley. Boy was I right. He practically ate it up. He was so glad to hear that there is a sequel to this book...even though it's not about hurricanes.
reviewed Wind Tamer on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Carrie Spellman for TeensReadToo.com

On the night before his tenth birthday, Archie Stringweed notices something a little strange. The wind seems to be talking to him. Is that possible? Archie thinks it can't be, so he doesn't say anything to anyone about it. But that's just the beginning of the odd occurrences. There's the present from his Uncle Rufus, that he obviously wasn't supposed to get, from the dirty look she keeps seeing his mother give the box. Archie doesn't see what the big deal is; it's just a harmless coin. Until he overhears his parents talking about all the presents Rufus has sent that have been hidden. That seems like a pretty big deal. Then there's his normally intelligent father suddenly becoming extremely forgetful. There's the snowstorm that only seems to be occurring over the Stringweeds' house, the giant bird that flies through his window carrying a coin that's a lot like the one he got from Uncle Rufus,and the glowing green ball that shows up every so often when Archie is alone. Then suddenly Rufus himself miraculously reappears after years and years of travelling. Archie is having a very eventful tenth birthday.

According to Uncle Rufus, that's not surprising. He tells Archie that there is a curse on all of the firstborn Stringweed children; on their tenth birthday, or shortly after, they will completely lose any courage they have. Not that they won't want to do things, they will just talk themselves out of it. Even simple things like flying in a plane, or going on the train, or taking a vacation. This of course seems crazy to Archie. How can someone lose all of their courage? But when he thinks about his dad, it seems like it might be possible. And horrible.

Rufus claims that Archie can break the curse, with the help of some family heirlooms and clues that Rufus has sent. The heirlooms would be all of the presents that Rufus has sent that Archie has never gotten, and the cards that came with them. Finding these things is only one of many obstacles Archie will have to overcome. Not the least of which is the wind. It really is talking to Archie, and it's not about to let him break the curse. In fact, it's coming for him.

Archie is confused, scared, unsure, and not even close to prepared. But if he can break the curse he not only gets to keep his own courage, but give his dad and grandfather theirs back. That seems like a pretty big deal.

A good adventure that teaches a great lesson: Courage is continuing in the face of fear. A lesson worth learning and remembering at any age. And this is a decidedly fun way to learn it.
reviewed Wind Tamer on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Carrie Spellman for TeensReadToo.com

On the night before his tenth birthday, Archie Stringweed notices something a little strange. The wind seems to be talking to him. Is that possible? Archie thinks it can't be, so he doesn't say anything to anyone about it. But that's just the beginning of the odd occurrences. There's the present from his Uncle Rufus, that he obviously wasn't supposed to get, from the dirty looks he keeps seeing his mother give the box. Archie doesn't see what the big deal is; it's just a harmless coin. Until he overhears his parents talking about all the presents Rufus has sent that have been hidden. That seems like a pretty big deal. Then there's his normally intelligent father suddenly becoming extremely forgetful. There's the snowstorm that only seems to be occurring over the Stringweeds' house, the giant bird that flies through his window carrying a coin that's a lot like the one he got from Uncle Rufus,and the glowing green ball that shows up every so often when Archie is alone. Then suddenly Rufus himself miraculously reappears after years and years of travelling. Archie is having a very eventful tenth birthday.

According to Uncle Rufus, that's not surprising. He tells Archie that there is a curse on all of the firstborn Stringweed children; on their tenth birthday, or shortly after, they will completely lose any courage they have. Not that they won't want to do things, they will just talk themselves out of it. Even simple things like flying in a plane, or going on the train, or taking a vacation. This of course seems crazy to Archie. How can someone lose all of their courage? But when he thinks about his dad, it seems like it might be possible. And horrible.

Rufus claims that Archie can break the curse, with the help of some family heirlooms and clues that Rufus has sent. The heirlooms would be all of the presents that Rufus has sent that Archie has never gotten, and the cards that came with them. Finding these things is only one of many obstacles Archie will have to overcome. Not the least of which is the wind. It really is talking to Archie, and it's not about to let him break the curse. In fact, it's coming for him.

Archie is confused, scared, unsure, and not even close to prepared. But if he can break the curse he not only gets to keep his own courage, but give his dad and grandfather theirs back. That seems like a pretty big deal.

A good adventure that teaches a great lesson: Courage is continuing in the face of fear. A lesson worth learning and remembering at any age. And this is a decidedly fun way to learn it.