Book Reviews of A Woman of Virtue

A Woman of Virtue
A Woman of Virtue
Author: Liz Carlyle
ISBN-13: 9780743410557
ISBN-10: 0743410556
Publication Date: 3/1/2001
Pages: 464
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 77

3.8 stars, based on 77 ratings
Publisher: Pocket
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

10 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed A Woman of Virtue on
Helpful Score: 4
This book has been sitting on my TBR pile for a long, long time. After reading page 136, I was wonder why the heck I was still reading this book, it was going S-L-O-W. Some people have a 50 or 100 page rule, but Ive always read every book that I have picked up, and did I really want to implement this 50 or 100 page rule? Anyways, I continued on and the book FINALLY started picking up! I did not have to give the book the DNF tag but I digress.

When the book picked up it was sweet and sensual with a mystery to solve. I did enjoy this book, dont get me wrong, the second half of the book more than makes up for the slow start. The hero, David, was a great character- most delightful in this reunited couple synopsis. His words were poetic and jumped off the pages. I wouldnt hesitate to pick up another book by Liz Carlyle.
reviewed A Woman of Virtue on + 41 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
I enjoyed the plot twists and turns. I enjoyed the character development. The murder, mystery, smuggling, heartache and heartbreak was intriguing. However, I really didn't enjoy all the sexual descriptions in this book.
reviewed A Woman of Virtue on + 503 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I read this mainly because I love Bentley "Hell-Bent" Rudtledge who appears in several Liz Carlyle books before he gets his own story.

A Woman of Virtue is not Carlyle's most well-paced romance. The hero and heroine treat each other horribly (especially her toward him) and it takes far too long to get past the hate in their relationship. I thought Carlyle made Cecilia almost unlikeable by her behavior and treatment of David at the start.

As much as I liked both characters (I warmed to Cecilia eventually), the pacing of the book, the overly long story and not very interesting mystery just didn't work. The best part of the book is the other characters. Catching up with Jonet and Cole, if you read their book A Woman Scorned, keeping track of Bentley whose book The Devil You Know is terrific, and then getting to know Max de Rohan who stars in the next book, No True Gentleman.

I've been reading her books out of order, finding myself intrigued by characters who obviously have an interesting story of their own. I like the way that while each book totally stands on its own, Carlyle seems to have connected her first three books, which are utterly disparate, with characters who meld and weave in and out of many many future books.
reviewed A Woman of Virtue on + 620 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Another enjoyable book from Liz Carlyle!
reviewed A Woman of Virtue on + 148 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Great bath tub book!
reviewed A Woman of Virtue on + 118 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I enjoyed reading this book very much.
reviewed A Woman of Virtue on + 40 more book reviews
Started, not finished.
reviewed A Woman of Virtue on + 75 more book reviews
Cecilia Lorimer has hidden her loneliness by devoting herself to charity mission for London's poorest women. But when dashing Lord Delacourt takes control, she feels an uncharacteristic urge to flee. Just six years earlier Delacourt had proved himself to be an immoral rake nearly ruining her reputation in the bargain.
reviewed A Woman of Virtue on + 71 more book reviews
From the grandeur of regency Mayfair to the dark danger of Londons East End, be swept away with a powerful story of love born against all odds, as a n honorable young widow stands fast against the cynical rogue who seems determined to consume her, heart and soul.

In the lonely months since her husband's death, Cecilia Lorimer has hidden her emptiness by devoting herself to a charity mission for the unfortunate women of London's slums. But when the dashing Lord Delacourt takes control, she feels an uncharacteristic urge to flee. Just six years earlier, Delacourt had proven himself to be the immoral rake society called him, nearly ruining her reputation in the bargain.

It's whispered that the womanizing Delacourt is vain, vindictive, and merciless. But he's a man who honors his wagers -- and one result lands him in his brother-in-law's godforsaken mission, face-to-face with the woman who has long haunted his dreams. When treachery closes in, only he knows how to guard Cecilia from the consequences of her own principles. Can a profligate knave persuade a virtuous woman that he is worthy of her trust -- and her love?
reviewed A Woman of Virtue on + 137 more book reviews
From the grandeur of Mayfair to the dark danger of London, a story of love born against all odds