Robert M. (shotokanchef) - Reviews

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The 13 Clocks
The 13 Clocks
Author: James Thurber, Marc Simont (Illustrator)
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 2.6/5 Stars.
 7
Review Date: 2/11/2014


Here is a great story--part parable, part fairy tale, part poem--to rival the Brothers Grimm. A real lost treasure.


13 For Luck
13 For Luck
Author: Agatha Christie
Book Type: Paperback
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Review Date: 8/6/2012


Hah! An unlucky number of quickies involving all of Aunties favorite sleuths. None of these are really great short stories, some are barely entertaining. If you have read other of her short story collections, you will find that many are repeated in this compilation.


15 American One Act Plays
15 American One Act Plays
Author: Paul Kozelka (Editor)
Book Type: Paperback
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Review Date: 1/17/2014


This compilation includes

Interesting
Thursday Evening (Christopher Morley)
The Lottery (Brainerd Duffield; Shirley Jackson)
Feathertop (Maurice Valency; Nathaniel Hawthorne)
The Still Alarm (George S. Kaufman)
The Trysting Place (Booth Tarkington)
Impromptu (Tad Mosel)
The Devil and Daniel Webster (Stephen Vincent Benet) Trifles (Susan Glaspell)
Not So
The Man Who Died At Twelve O'clock (Paul Green)
Aria Da Capo (Edna St. Vincent Millay)
Dust of the Road (Kenneth Sawyer Goodman)
The Undercurrent (Fay Elhert)
Red Carnations (Glenn Hughes)
The Neighbors (Zona Gale)
Sorry, Wrong Number (Lucille Fletcher)

My personal favorites are The Still Alarm (anything by Kaufman is bound to be witty) and The Trysting Place (another witty work by Tarkington. And, what can one say about enactments of such classics as The Lottery, Feathertop, and The Devil and Daniel Webster? Those could hardly be expected to miscue. Of the remainder, enough said.


Review Date: 2/12/2012


Beggar On Horseback
This is one of their early collaborations. An almost down-and-out composer is pushed into proposing to a rich girl. Of course, he is in love with the girl across the hall, but, after some early chuckles, he proposes anyway. Much of this first part (they did not designate acts) is taken up with a sort of group stream of consciousness during which everyone talks over everyone else. Now comes an extended (over half of the play) dream sequencemore like a nightmarein which he finds himself married to rich girls family, murders them, and is put on trial. This is like trying to listen to the radio version of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. He finally awakens and the whole mess is rectified. He gets the girl from across the hall. Finis. This had to be a producers nightmare in 1924: 29 character roles, an uncountable number of walk-on parts with multiple costume changes, multiple scenery changes, and music; not to mention the difficulties of controlling the many simultaneous orations by several actors in several settings.
All My Sons
Although written in 1947 in the aftermath of World War II, the basic theme of corporate greed and malfeasance is still appropriate: to wit the multiple scandals emanating from contracting for the Iraqi wars. Unfortunately, the play is protracted through endless useless dialog (although some of the early scenes do contain a tad of wit). There are a few letdowns to justice; Miller builds our hopes only to thrash them in the end. Nevertheless, read this for its basic theme of greed.
The Adding Machine
Dont bother! I find it difficult to accept that even an academic could like, let along read, this tripe. But, I suppose the symbolism of naming the characters Mr. and Mrs. Zero through Six gives rise to the title, or vice versa. And, of course, the adding machine, that futuristic automation that displaces workers, is symbolic, as is Vonneguts Player Piano. Anyway, death to the capitalist!


4:50 From Paddington (Miss Marple, Bk 7)
4:50 From Paddington (Miss Marple, Bk 7)
Author: Agatha Christie
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 24
Review Date: 4/14/2012


Mrs. McGillicuddy witnesses a murder in a passing train. No one believes her; so naturally she must tell her friend, Miss Marple. When no body can be found, Dear old Jane takes charge to discover the body. This is one of Aunties best novels, that is until I discover that dear old Jane has theories that she wont divulge until two more people are murdered. Auntie likes neat little threes. So finally dear old Jane pulls a Perry Mason to get the culprit to self-expose. Auntie did keep me guessing until the end though. Too bad that all these Miss Marple stories end so abruptly and in the same fashion.


6 Plays by Rodgers and Hammerstein
Review Date: 1/25/2013


These, by the team who redefined the musical, are their earliest works: 1942-1953. Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific, and The King and I, enough said. The other two are somewhat obscure. Allegro I am wondering why they bothered. No real story, no identifiable songs. The last, Me and Juliet, has one redeeming feature: the song No Other Love. Set to the sweeping tango of Richard Rodgers' music from Victory At Sea (then titled Under the Southern Cross), it gained great popularity in the mid-1950s.


6 Rms Riv Vu
6 Rms Riv Vu
Author: Bob Randall
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 1
Review Date: 1/1/2013


Try this cute little play about couples checking out a rent-controlled apartment in New York. The moral could be never check out an apartment without your spouse. The principal players all have some common ties but fall in love anyway. Humorous, but partly absurd that could only happen in a Broadway play. It certainly had the right star for its day: Jerry Orbach.


The Abbess of Crewe: A Modern Morality Tale
Review Date: 6/6/2011


A novella panning religious and political hypocrisy. The naughty Abbey of Crewe is up to their neck in Watergate activities that ultimately evolve into scandal. Its all here: eavesdropping, electronic surveillance, election rigging, breaking and entering, blackmail, a tad of gluttony, and (lest I forget) a wee element of ecclesiastical fornication. Or, as we hear in the musical Chicago, everything that makes life worth living.


Absolute Friends
Absolute Friends
Author: John le Carre
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.6/5 Stars.
 32
Review Date: 10/26/2011


Teddy and Sasha are malcontents from opposite sides of the wall: friends to the endliterally. Spies: double agents if you will. Here you shall find all of the grueling detail of their tempestuous relationship, from the early cold war years, through the downfall of the wall, to the anti-terror campaigns of Iraq Part II. Here also is all of the snide wit in the authors repertoire as he chronicles his protagonists histories to what he calls the second siege of Heidelberg: a denouement that will make you shriek with rage. While he does pound his points across with unrelenting reiteration (à la Zola), stick with him; the end is worth the means.


Absurd Person Singular
Absurd Person Singular
Author: Alan Ayckbourn
Book Type: Hardcover
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Review Date: 12/9/2010


Ayckbourn is billed as Britains answer to Neil Simon. Actually, this play is funnier than anything Simon ever dreamed of. (Pardon my faulty grammar!) Three couples host party every Christmas and every Christmas everything goes awry. This is a behind the scene look from the kitchen of the hosting couple. So here we have a sampler of Christmas over and done with, Christmas now and yet unfinished, and Christmas yet to come: each zanier than the last, although my vote is for the second act.


The Actual : A Novella
The Actual : A Novella
Author: Saul Bellow
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3/5 Stars.
 7
Review Date: 6/23/2009
Helpful Score: 1


Typical Bellow novel in the vein of modern Jewish writers. Splattered with multiple divorces, and sexual innuendo, but tastefully done. The plot is about relatively nothing: the narrator and his long-time heartthrob take on (separately) Chicago billionaires as clients, meet, dig up and rebury her last spouse, andwell, you have to fill in the ending. With a little tweaking, this could make a great Seinfeld episode. There is enough latitude in the character development to twist the serious into comic. I felt that the author has his narrator wander back and forth in time too frequently, often in short bursts. At times I had difficulty discerning who was narrating at any point. He also repeats facts about the characters, often several times. In a 103 page novelette, do I need a constant refresher?


The Admirable Crichton: A Comedy
Review Date: 9/30/2011


Crichtonthe commensurate butler to Lord Loam is abashed by said lords mandate that his household, once a month, treat all servants as equals. Of course, this also implies that within their own hierarchy they are also equalsa duty that does not set too well amongst their own caste system. Ditto for the gentry of my lords household. Thus, we begin with tea time in merry England as every player makes it subtly known how they feel. And, who can blame them in one of the worlds most everlasting monarchys where even military officers have purchased their commissions, or have obtained them through political influence, and are thus entitled to servants commensurate with their rank. So, it is a battle of the servant castes against the aristocracy of the peerage. The family is shipwrecked on a deserted island. Crichton to the rescue! He is a veritable Robinson Crusoe, although the family is anything but the Swiss Family Robinson. Eventually roles are reversed though; Crichton is in charge. Now a rescue and all ends well and back to normal in merry old England.


Adventures of a Simpleton (Simplicissimus)
Review Date: 2/29/2012
Helpful Score: 2


The jacket praises this as being a tale of a German Candide, although it was written some 90 years earlier (1669) than Voltaires classic (1760). Nonetheless, there are similarities. It is also somewhat akin to the misadventures of Don Quixote (1605, or thereabouts), and Gil Blas (1715-1735). The first part of Defoes Memoirs of a Cavalier (1720) covers similar ground during the 30-year war between Sweden and Germany. As some parts are also quite fantastic, it might also be a predecessor to Raspes Baron Munchausen and Vernes Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864), although this printing omits Simplicius visit to inner Earth. And, at this point, I might also throw in Edgar Rice Burroughs Pelucidar (1914 and later) and Caspak (1918) novels. So, heres a reading list for you to peruse and compare. In spite of the obscurity of this novel, it is worth pursuingif you can find it.


After Many a Summer Dies the Swan
After Many a Summer Dies the Swan
Author: Aldous Huxley
Book Type: Paperback
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Review Date: 7/25/2009


This is a series of his philosophical essays loosely connected by a storyline relating to the search for an elixir of life. In the end, we find, as did Tennysons Tithonus, that eternal life must be accompanied by eternal youth as well. He begins with a parody into the lifestyles of the rich and famous of Hollywood. Early in the novel (published in 1939) he dwells upon the plight of migrant laborers: the dust bowl émigrés that Steinbeck documented in The Harvest Gypsies (1936) and fictionalized in In Dubious Battle (1936) and The Grapes of Wrath (1939). There is also an interesting bit about the use of solar energy. The author (primarily through the alter-ego character of Professor Propter) then wanders glibly among a kaleidoscope of philosophies among which are, art for the sake of art, 18th century French pornography, Darwinism, and deep-seated, fatalism. Most of these are rather long-windedrivaling Faulkner in length.


After Supper Ghost Stories
After Supper Ghost Stories
Author: Jerome K. Jerome
Book Type: Paperback
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Review Date: 5/1/2010


The book contains only a few rather tame tales of revenant encounters, but not without prodding some worthwhile fun, for which the author is noted. These are so brief that the book was printed double-spaced, full page drawings are blank on the obverse and both pages are numbered. Easily read in an hour or two.


After the Fall
After the Fall
Author: Arthur Miller
Book Type: Paperback
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Review Date: 10/2/2009
Helpful Score: 1


Pseudo-memoir of author's marriage to Marilyn Monroe and his involvement with the House Unamerican Activities Committee in the 1960s. Told through the thoughts of the main character, Quentin, a lawyer who is to defend another lawyer who is to appear before the HUAC and who intends to name names: not unlike his own experience in the Hollywood realm. Quentin has been married and divorced, remarries to a Marilyn Monroe type character (who dies under similar circumstances), and has a third wife waiting in the wings. Rather controversial and recondite in spots with a dearth of scenery and props. While Quentin interacts with the characters in his mind, he addresses his thoughts predominately an invisible âListener.â Definitely not for the casual reader.


After the Funeral (Hercule Poirot, Bk 30) (aka: Funerals Are Fatal)
Review Date: 1/25/2013


Inheritance plays the major role in this when the patriarch dies suddenly. Poirot does it again in this tale in which everyone is suspect of a possible murder, a brutal murder, and a near murder. Auntie will keep you guessing until the final chapters, although the finale, as with most Poirot novels, may leave you less than satisfied


AFTERNOON OF AN AUTHOR (Afternoon of an Author SL 332)
Review Date: 3/24/2013


This is a nice sampling of his short stories interspersed with some interesting essays.


Agatha Christie's "A Murder is Announced" (Adapted for the Stage)
Review Date: 11/1/2012


A murder is advertised in the personals column of the local blather giving the time and place. But, who is to be the victim; who the culprit? These are the questions for the police and for who else but Miss Marple. This two act play was adapted from Dame Agatha's novel by Leslie Darbon. Although the inimitable Miss Marple provides the explanation, we are left to understand that the police inspector has solved this one. I wonder what the book will tell me if I can find it? At any rate it is a play on identities. Is anyone whom they purport to be? Well, it is an entertaining play, but pay attention.


Ah But Your Land Is Beautiful
Ah But Your Land Is Beautiful
Author: Alan Paton
Book Type: Paperback
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Review Date: 5/7/2009
Helpful Score: 1


If you missed Cry, the Beloved Country and Too Late the Phalarope read these first! Ah, But Your Land Is Beautiful, which is betwixt a novel and non-fiction, documents the attempts of the Afrikaners to solidify apartheid during the period 1952-1958. It is written eloquently narrated in part by a subordinate government official who, through letters to his aunt, sets the flow of the storyboth novel and documentary. Some elements mirror, or adapt, the style of Dos Passos in Manhattan Transfer and The USA Trilogy. The title emanates from exclamations of casual travelers who observe merely the beauty of a locale without seeing the elemental discord within the environment. It reminds me of my own travels through the southern states in early 1962. My group marveled at the quiet splendor of one of our stopover pointsSelma, AL. The author clearly brings out the conflicts of those years in South Africa; a period that was to become a change agent for equality.


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