Bookwyrme - Reviews

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I Can Add (Lift-A-Flap)
I Can Add (Lift-A-Flap)
Book Type: Hardcover
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Review Date: 5/29/2008


Product Dimensions: 11.5 x 10 x 0.6 inches

From the back: Let's learn how to add! Flip the cards and add these colorful objects and numbers. Then lift the flap to check your addition. This interactive book is an exciting way to learn to add!

This is a board book with 5 lift a flap pages. Each page having various addition problems to work out. There are also 33 spiral bound triptych-type cards offering a large variety/combination of addition problems to work through.

The reading level for this book is set at baby-preschool. This is most definately not a book for a baby. It is most age appropriate for preschool - kindergarten aged children.


The Littlest Angel
The Littlest Angel
Book Type: Hardcover
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Review Date: 3/7/2008


The classic Christmas story tells of an adorable little angel who just cannot stay out of trouble in the celestial city. When the Christ child is born, the mischievous angel learns the timeless lesson of giving, a lesson that has long endured as the true spirit of Christmas.

First released in book form in 1946, this story has since appeared in numerous editions. It tells of a small angel who simply can't get with the program no matter how hard he tries until an understanding elder realizes that he is homesick and is able to retrieve a box of his most treasured possessions from "back home." When it comes time for Jesus to be born on Earth, the Littlest Angel gives his precious box to the Baby, but he is worried that God will think his gift too humble. However, God is pleased indeed, and transforms the box into the Star of Bethlehem. The writing style is rather ornate and full of grandiose words and phrases, but some children will love to hear it read aloud. The oil paintings are muted and full of texture, and not at all sentimental. The celestial choir is multicultural, and the Littlest Angel has red shorts peeking out of his robe.


Pandora's Grave (Shadow Warriors)
Pandora's Grave (Shadow Warriors)
Author: Stephen M. England
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
 1
Review Date: 8/15/2013


Great new series by an incredibly talented young writer. Had me reading long into the night. His second book in the series "Day of Reckoning" is due August 2013. Very much looking forward to the next installment!


Sweet and Sour
Sweet and Sour
Author: Andrew A. Rooney
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 4.7/5 Stars.
 3
Review Date: 2/22/2008


From Publishers Weekly
Rooney's 10th book collects his syndicated columns--which many find to be better pointed than his contributions to 60 Minutes --from the last three years. It begins with a few pieces that present a kinder, gentler pop philosopher waxing sentimental about homes and families. Happily, he soon hits his stride with typically trenchant columns about the ubiquity of advertising, lowering taxes on the rich now that he has discovered that government guidelines classify him as rich, motel rooms that cost $151 per night, "antiques" that are simply junk, his proclivity for losing things, the hypocrisy of political candidates' concession speeches and the illogic of the Postal Service's two-letter abbreviations of state names. Arranged according to subject, the eight sections range from "Home and Away" to "First Things, Last Things." Most of the selections are compelling, engrossing and gripping--those being the adjectives Rooney says he would like reviewers to use in assessing his books.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.


Wemberly Worried
Wemberly Worried
Author: Kevin Henkes
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 11
Review Date: 3/7/2008


Henkes (Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse) introduces another wonderfully appealing child-mouse with a stubborn habit: worrying. Wemberly, a shy white mouse with gray spots, always feels nervous whether at home or away. "At the playground, Wemberly worried about/ the chains on the swings,/ and the bolts on the slide,/ and the bars on the jungle gym." She tells her father, "Too rusty. Too loose. Too high," while sitting on a park bench watching the other mice play. Her security blanket, a rabbit doll named Petal (whose spot over the left eye matches her own), rarely leaves her grip. Henkes adroitly juggles the main narrative, hand-lettered asides and watercolor-and-ink imagery of the young pessimist and her supportive parents; each element contributes a different strength. For instance, as he lists Wemberly's worries, "Big things" heads the list, paired with a vignette of the heroine checking on her parents in the middle of the night with a flashlight, "I wanted to make sure you were still here." He later shows how Wemberly's anxieties peak at the start of nursery school with huge text that dwarfs tiny illustrations. At this overwhelming moment, Wemberly meets another girl mouse, Jewel, who turns out to be a kindred spirit (she even carries her own worn doll). Henkes offers no pat solutions, handling the material with uncanny empathy and gentleness; while playing with Jewel, "Wemberly worried. But no more than usual. And sometimes even less." This winning heroine speaks to the worrywart in everyone. Ages 4-up.

4 stars on Amazon


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