Kitty S. (kittynewengland) - Reviews

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11/22/63
11/22/63
Author: Stephen King
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 4.3/5 Stars.
 272
Review Date: 1/3/2014


Interesting historical fiction book by Stephen King about a man who goes back in time to try and stop the assassination of President Kennedy. The Good: It is well-researched and the reader really feels transported back to life in America in the late 1950s/early 1960s. I liked reading about George/Jake's life in Jodie, Texas and his romance with Sadie. King is a good storyteller. The Bad: At more than 800 pages, the novel is bloated. It could have been tighter, without any loss to the story.


About Grace
About Grace
Author: Anthony Doerr
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.6/5 Stars.
 32
Review Date: 3/31/2012
Helpful Score: 1


It is rare for me not to finish a book I start, but this was one of those cases. I thought the premise was fascinating--a man who can foretell tragedy for his family, but the execution failed for me. There were times I felt like I was reading a science textbook because there was so much about water and snow.


After You'd Gone
After You'd Gone
Author: Maggie O'Farrell
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.6/5 Stars.
 28
Review Date: 10/15/2011


Maggie O'Farrell's story was difficult to get into at first. Jumping time lines and points of view with little or no indication between paragraphs that the time line has changed. Patient readers will be rewarded by Part 2 when the story hits its stride. The story of Alice is about a wonderful love affair, a tragedy and a deceptive family history. Very emotional and satisfying read.


Afterwards
Afterwards
Author: Rosamund Lupton
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 11
Review Date: 6/2/2018


I picked up this book because I liked the author's previous book SISTER. If I had known it was narrated by a mother whose spirit is living outside her body while she is in a coma, I might not have chosen it. It is not evident from the book flap that that is the case. Once I decided to carry on, I was glad I did. Interesting who done it. Relationships, families, teachers, and school communities hold lots of secrets.


The Age of Miracles
The Age of Miracles
Author: Karen Thompson Walker
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 3.6/5 Stars.
 65
Review Date: 5/22/2013
Helpful Score: 3


This is a coming of age story authentically narrated by Julia, a middle school student living with her parents in California. The usual adolescent angst is there: first love, shifting friendship, first bra. The unusual part is that the story is set against the uncertainty of a world that is literally slowing down. There's more promise than greatness in the novel, but still a worthwhile read.


The Art of Fielding
The Art of Fielding
Author: Chad Harbach
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 46
Review Date: 1/14/2013


The Art of Fielding is a baseball book that, of course, isn't merely about baseball. But there are so many baseball scenes and references that I do think a reader has to like baseball or know about baseball in order to enjoy the book. That being said, the Art of Fielding is about the lives of five intertwined people on a college campus located along the shore of Lake Michigan. The characters face defining moments, failure (errors) and self-doubt. There were times when this novel reminded me of A Prayer for Owen Meany and The Secret History. I liked The Art of Fielding, although I'm not convinced it merited its "one of the best books of the year" status bestowed by many outlets (Amazon, NY Times).


The Art of Racing in the Rain
The Art of Racing in the Rain
Author: Garth Stein
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 994
Review Date: 10/16/2011


Heartrending story about a man and his family and the ordeals they face--narrated by the family dog. You don't have to be a fan of auto racing or own a dog to love this book. Recommended.


The Ask
The Ask
Author: Sam Lipsyte
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 2.6/5 Stars.
 5
Review Date: 12/22/2011


I was looking forward to reading The Ask by Sam Lipsyte, a New York Times bestseller and Notable Book of the Year. I work on the East Coast in higher education and know that the fundraising field is ripe for satire. I even like snarkiness. But The Ask wasn't my cup of tea. The main character, Milo Burke, is unlikeable. The story is unnecessarily vulgar and raunchy in places. I gave up after about a 100 pages. It is very rare for me not to finish a book, but life is too short to read a book you dont like.


The Beach House
The Beach House
Author: Jane Green
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 215
Review Date: 12/2/2009


Sweet, albeit maybe too perfect, tale of people at a crossroads in their lives and how a stay at a Nantucket beach house changes the course of their lives. The characters are really interesting and the reader grows to care what happens to them. The only thing better would have been reading it on a beach in Nantucket!


Bel Canto
Bel Canto
Author: Ann Patchett
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 872
Review Date: 3/31/2012


I found the story in this award-winning book refreshingly different and unique. It is about a months-long hostage situation in a South American nation that involves citizens from different countries who speak different languages. The character Gen Watanabe is a multilingual translator who bridges the barriers between terrorist and hostage and hostage and fellow hostage. Music and song, specifically opera, also erase barriers. I thought at first the length of their hostage situation seem unrealistic until I learned it was inspired by a similar event in Peru in 1996-97. Some have criticized the ending, but while I found it jarring, it was realistic. What was unrealistic was continuing the life and relationships created in the mansion under seige.


Belong to Me
Belong to Me
Author: Marisa De Los Santos
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 185
Review Date: 7/10/2010


This book is a sequel to the book Love Walked In. I would highly recommend reading them in sequence so the reader can appreciate how Clare came into Cornelia's life and how Cornelia and Teo got together. That being said, it is a nice novel. Cornelia is a very likable character, someone you wish you were friends with in real life. The way the characters evolve into friends (Cornelia and Piper; Clare, Dev and Aidan) is real and sweet. Some of the book's setup is a bit unbelievable and some of the subplots (Toby, Lyssa) are distracting and extraneous. Good, not excellent.


The Bright Forever
The Bright Forever
Author: Lee Martin
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.6/5 Stars.
 208
Review Date: 7/9/2011


In the Bright Forever, Katie, a sweet nine-year-old girl goes missing from her small town in Indiana. The story unfolds through different characters' voices. It is a successful device that really moves the novel along and makes it a page-turner. Katie's tutor, Mr. Dees, is a particularly memorable character--creepy yet sympathetic.


The Butterfly Cabinet
The Butterfly Cabinet
Author: Bernie McGill
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 3.1/5 Stars.
 14
Review Date: 7/3/2012


Inspired by true events, The Butterfly Cabinet tells the haunting story of a young girl's death and her mother's subsequent imprisonment in 1890s Northern Ireland. The story is told in two voices--via the mother, through her prison diary, and the maid who, now in her old age, is the last surviving member of the family/household who lived in the mansion at the time of Charlotte's death. I will say that the big reveal that is hinted at throughout the book did not live up to the hype. The book did make me think about how limited the options were for women in 19th century. Harriet should never have been a mother. She loved riding horses and collecting butterflies, but she could not muster any affection for her children. If she were born today she could chose to not have children and have lived a happy, content life. This does not excuse her coldness and abuse of her children, but I can see her as a victim of her times.


The Cat's Table
The Cat's Table
Author: Michael Ondaatje
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 19
Review Date: 2/21/2014


Story of 11-year-old Michael and his two friends and their adventures (mostly unsupervised) on a three-week voyage from Sri Lanka to England in the 1950s. Much like the voyage, the novel takes a long time to get to the dramatic moment that is hinted at. Liked it, didn't love it.


Caught
Caught
Author: Harlan Coben
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 268
Review Date: 7/16/2011


Fast-paced, interesting read about a case of a suspected child predator that turns out to be about much more.


The Chaperone
The Chaperone
Author: Laura Moriarty
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 50
Review Date: 2/14/2015


An engaging historical fiction read about the fictional Cora Carlisle who chaperones the real Louise Brooks on a trip to New York City in 1922. The novel covers many 20th century topics, such as the orphan trains, changing attitudes about race and homosexuality, women's rights, etc. I had never heard of Louise Brooks and I was intrigued enough to read about her life after I finished THE CHAPERONE. The overriding theme of this book is "home." Many of the characters grapple with where their true home is. Home is not necessarily where you were born. Home is where you feel comfortable, accepted and loved.


Commencement (Vintage Contemporaries)
Commencement (Vintage Contemporaries)
Author: J. Courtney Sullivan
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.3/5 Stars.
 57
Review Date: 5/2/2011


Celia, Bree, Sally and April meet as first year students at Smith College and become fast friends. The book covers their college years into their early to mid-20s. Though I am no longer twentysomething and my college experience was nothing likes theirs was at Smith, I found Commencement to be an interesting read. I did notice that there were virtually no redeeming men in the novel-- don't know whether that is a Smith thing or whether the author just doesn't like men.


Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter (P.S.)
Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter (P.S.)
Author: Tom Franklin
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 100
Review Date: 5/20/2012


A well-written book part murder mystery and part coming of age story. The author smoothly transitions from present day to past to tell the story of Larry Ott, a man ostracized by his Mississippi town because of his connection to a missing persons case, and Silas Jones, his childhood friend who has returned to the town as constable. Though slow to start, I found this story of race, friendship and secrets gripping, sad and ultimately redemptive.


The Crying Tree: A Novel
The Crying Tree: A Novel
Author: Naseem Rakha
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 15
Review Date: 7/15/2011


Excellent, well-written book about what happens to a family when their teenage son/brother is murdered in their home and the killer is sentenced to death. Told from the perspectives of the family members and the man tasked with carrying out the execution. The story is about grief, hatred, forgiveness, and the harm of keeping secrets. I read the last 10 pages through tears. Highly recommended.


The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
Author: Mark Haddon
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 4420
Review Date: 5/20/2012


This story started out very engaging but fell flat for me in the later chapters--including a very tedious passage about the main character's train ride to London. While a story featuring the voice of someone with Autism or Asperger's offers a unique perspective, there still must be an interesting story to tell at the heart of it. I thought the premise was better carried out in Jodi Picoult's House Rules and Jonathan Safran Foer's Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close.


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