jjares - Reviews

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The 1920s (Decades of the 20th Century)
The 1920s (Decades of the 20th Century)
Author: Nick Yapp
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 4.3/5 Stars.
 4
Review Date: 1/22/2015


This book captures the 1920s beautifully; from silent films to the Depression, from the Jazz Age to economic chaos. There are over 300 black-and-white photos that show it all and explain things in English, German and French.

The section, The Haves and the Have Nots is a particularly poignant group of photos. We tend to see films with famous actors in their later years; this book offers early views of Jimmy Cagney, Noel Coward, Joan Crawford and Marlene Dietrich.

This is an engaging book that brings to the reader the grotesque and gorgeous era in Americas history. The entire series is worthwhile but this book really gives a broad view of an exciting and frightening age.


The 1960s (Cultural History of the United States Through the Decades)
Review Date: 5/8/2016


Having lived during these turbulent 10 years, I appreciated the fact that things seemed to be reported in a rather even-handed fashion . Although aimed towards 9 to 12 year-olds, I found this tome very interesting. It did a wonderful job of looking over the panorama of a very upsetting era. I was disappointed with the large number of black-and-white (instead of color photos).

The author makes a point of saying that the 1960's opened with happiness. A young president and his wife occupied the White House and many referred the presidency as Camelot. The euphoria ended with John Kennedy's death. I was a junior in high school (American History class, to be exact) when the news came.

Then, it seemed as if the country was coming unglued: another Kennedy murder, Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination, rioting over civil rights and the Vietnam War. It was the first time war was shown literally as it happened and US citizens didn't like what they saw.
I remember feeling very frightened about what was happening. Things that had made sense suddenly changed. People we thought were leading our country sounded like regular liars on TV (LBJ, General Westmoreland, etc.).

This volume offered a useful chronology of the decade; provided the books used and offered suggestions for further reading.


19th Century Schoolgirl: The Diary of Caroline Cowles Richards, 1852-1855 (Diaries, Letters, and Memoirs)
Review Date: 8/10/2013


The essential value of such a book as this is to take a peek at everyday life in America in the years before the Civil War. It is considered to be a primary source - which is important to those of us who work on genealogy. Primary sources give firsthand accounts of folk's lives; they may appear in letters, diaries, photos, etc.

Caroline was 10 years at the time she began her diary; she lived in western New York, in Canadagua, near the Finger Lakes region. When Caroline was 6, her mother died and her father wanted her to be raised well (good education). Thus, this teacher and Presbyterian minister sent his daughters to their grandparents to live.

His sons were sent to boarding schools. In those days everyone went to elementary school until age 10 - 12. The goal was to teach children how to read, write, spell, do math, plus learn geography, grammar and history. Both genders engaged in physical education.

After elementary school, only the wealthy could afford to send their children to private schools and the poorer children went to work. Seminaries (for girls) and boarding schools (for boys) were separated by gender because it was believed females and males had different educational needs.

The biggest surprise in this small tome is related to Grandmother Beals. Caroline reports that when her grandfather left on a trip out-of-town, Mrs. Beals invited an elderly (and quite portly) black woman to her house for dinner. She also sent a carriage to collect and return the woman to her home.

I was surprised; abolition might be the way people thought in New York State, but prejudice against interacting with them was still the accepted course. Grandmother was rather feisty to tempt the wrath of her neighbors.

The book is a delight with lots of photos, which made the diary jump to life. I just wish it had been longer.

4.5 stars


The Abduction (Harlequin Historical, No 78)
The Abduction (Harlequin Historical, No 78)
Author: Patricia Potter
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 8
Review Date: 10/17/2012


This book is Patricia Potters first Scottish historical romance and frankly it shows. At an early point in the book, I found the traitor to be blindingly obvious.

This is an interesting story but the dialogue dragged at times and the build-up to the final confrontation seemed to last forever. However, Potter did one thing very well she offered a long enough ending to tie up several loose ends. Sometimes, Potter rushes the last few pages, as if she cant wait to finish the story.

Alex and Elsbeth are star-crossed lovers; each from an opposing, hostile clan. These two main characters lacked the sparkle and well-developed characterizations of other Potter novels.

Patricia Potter published five books in 1991 (Lawless, Island of Dreams, The Abduction, Rainbow, and The Greatest Gift. Perhaps this is why this book wasnt one of her best; however, Lawless was super!


The Abduction (Harlequin Historical, No 78)
The Abduction (Harlequin Historical, No 78)
Author: Patricia Potter
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 10
Review Date: 10/17/2012


This book is Patricia Potters first Scottish historical romance and frankly it shows. At an early point in the book, I found the traitor to be blindingly obvious.

This is an interesting story but the dialogue dragged at times and the build-up to the final confrontation seemed to last forever. However, Potter did one thing very well she offered a long enough ending to tie up several loose ends. Sometimes, Potter rushes the last few pages, as if she cant wait to finish the story.

Alex and Elsbeth are star-crossed lovers; each from an opposing, hostile clan. These two main characters lacked the sparkle and well-developed characterizations of other Potter novels.

Patricia Potter published five books in 1991 (Lawless, Island of Dreams, The Abduction, Rainbow, and The Greatest Gift. Perhaps this is why this book wasnt one of her best; however, Lawless was super!


The Abduction (Legacy of Love)
The Abduction (Legacy of Love)
Author: Patricia Potter
Book Type: Paperback
  ?
Review Date: 10/17/2012
Helpful Score: 1


This book is Patricia Potter's first Scottish historical romance - and frankly it shows. At an early point in the book, I found the traitor to be blindingly obvious.

This is an interesting story but the dialogue dragged at times and the build-up to the final confrontation seemed to last forever. However, Potter did one thing very well - she offered a long enough ending to tie up several loose ends. Sometimes, Potter rushes the last few pages, as if she can't wait to finish the story.

Alex and Elsbeth are star-crossed lovers; each from an opposing, hostile clan. These two main characters lacked the sparkle and well-developed characterizations of other Potter novels.

Patricia Potter published five books in 1991 (Lawless, Island of Dreams, The Abduction, Rainbow, and The Greatest Gift. Perhaps this is why this book wasn't one of her best; however, Lawless was super!


About Face: A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery (Commissario Guido Brunetti Mysteries)
Review Date: 9/22/2015
Helpful Score: 1


This story seems to have been snatched from recent headlines; it is about women who have plastic surgery; Italian political corruption and what to do with trash when all of Europe's landfills are full. Of course, readers are also allowed a glimpse into the home life of a Venetian family (Guido Brunetti).

There's a lot going on in this book; political corruption seems to be a constant in Italian life. With that in the background, the other two themes play out their stories. Commissario Guido Brunetti and his wife are invited to a dinner at his parents-in-law's home. Brunetti is seated across from a very interesting woman with a scarred face. Everyone who sees her think it is plastic surgery gone bad' -- most also think she is too young to have gone under the knife (she's in her mid-thirties).

The woman's much older husband asks Brunetti's father-in-law to go into partnership with him. Then, Brunetti's father-in-law asks him to casually look into this prospective business partner's background.

Solutions for handling trash (regular, medical, nuclear, etc.) are a growing problem in Italy. I learned a great deal about what countries are doing now and it is not a pretty picture. Although the potential business partner says he is in the transportation business, Brunetti soon learns that he is transporting trash to third world countries.

I found this to be a believable and fascinating -- story. This is the 18th story and I don't recommend someone start with this one. Leon's style is interesting; she doesn't explain any of the back stories of secondary characters. But her regular readers know about them as they have been introduced.

Guido Brunetti
1. Death at La Fenice (1992)
2. Death in a Strange Country (1993)
3. The Anonymous Venetian (1994) aka Dressed for Death
4. A Venetian Reckoning (1995) aka Death and Judgment
5. Acqua Alta (1996) aka Death in High Water

6. The Death of Faith (1997) aka Quietly in Their Sleep
7. A Noble Radiance (1997)
8. Fatal Remedies (1998)
9. Friends in High Places (1999) Dagger Awards Best Novel nominee (2000): Friends in High Places
10. A Sea of Troubles (2001)

11. Willful Behaviour (2002)
12. Uniform Justice (2003)
13. Doctored Evidence (2004)
14. Blood from a Stone (2005)
15. Through a Glass Darkly (2006)

16. Suffer the Little Children (2007)
17. The Girl of His Dreams (2008)
18. About Face (2009)


The Accidental Lawman
The Accidental Lawman
Author: Jill Marie Landis
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
  • Currently 3.4/5 Stars.
 25
Review Date: 1/29/2015


This is a sweet Christian Historical novel by Jill Marie Landis; I did not know she wrote Christian fiction. All of the characters (not just the main ones) were carefully drawn and participated in this story. The citizens (and town of Glory, Texas) were engaging.

Amelia Hawthorne is a healer who walks into the town bank just before it is robbed. A stranger trips over Amelia (Hank Larson) and happens to stop the robbery. Immediately, the citizens clamor to name him sheriff; Hank agrees reluctantly.

The citizens assure Hank that nothing ever happens in Glory; it will be an easy task until someone else will take the role. This story pulls the reader in rather quickly and keeps the readers interest.

Hank finds out that Amelia is a healer and a mid-wife; before his death, her father was the only doctor for miles. Hank is horrified; a year before, his wife and child were killed by the incompetence of a mid-wife and Hank still wears the scars of their loss.

The author captures the bustle of a small town and peoples it with folks the reader will care about; they will also enjoy the gossip-tendencies of the town folk. These characters are so likeable that readers are eager to meet them again in future books.

This is a low-key, pleasant story about 2 people who have to get over their prejudices against the other before they can enter into a serious relationship.


Ace of Hearts (House of Cards, Bk 1)
Ace of Hearts (House of Cards, Bk 1)
Author: Barbara Metzger
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 57
Review Date: 7/24/2016


This is a delightful trio of stories (see the list below). You will laugh out loud with the antics in this story. It is just plain fun. The hero in this outing is almost an anti-hero. Ace, an earl, is shaking the dust of London to get away from the three women he is engaged to (at the same time). He makes a point of running away from unpleasant problems.

Alex (Ace) and his brother, Jack, were given a quest by their dying father. Earlier, there was a carriage accident that claimed his second wife and all hands in the conveyance. However, the baby Lottie (Charlotte) Endicott disappeared -- without a trace. The old earl was convinced that the child still lived and begged his sons to continue the search for their half-sister.

Ace decides that this would be a great time to search for Lottie. To that end, he goes to the place his step-mother was visiting at the time of her death. As he arrives at the Ambeaux Cottage, he finds that the brother entrusted with the care if his manor (and its tenants) has been stealing, draining the value from Ace's minor estate.

There, Ace meets the sister, Nell, a lovely spinster, under the thumb of her older brother. Nell is an interesting character; her best friend is a goose, Wellsley. The goose is rather protective of Nell and attacks those he feels have gotten too forward. When the goose attacks Ace and his horse, he winds up with a head wound, broken ribs and a dislocated shoulder. While Ace is trying to get well, Fiancee #1 arrives, planning to snare the earl at last.

The house also holds the old aunt, who has regular conversations with the dead. Ace has a wonderful valet who adds much to the comical goings-on. As you can see, there are plenty of zany characters to keep the story going. Be sure to read these books in order.

House of Cards Trilogy
1. Ace of Hearts (2005)
2. Jack of Clubs (2006)
3. Queen of Diamonds (2006)


The Admiral's Penniless Bride (Harlequin Historical, No 1025)
The Admiral's Penniless Bride (Harlequin Historical, No 1025)
Author: Carla Kelly
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 58
Review Date: 5/29/2014


This charming story is about a woman who is destined to go to the workhouse because she is down-on-her-luck and can find no work. As a last defiant gesture, Sally Paul walks into The Drake and has a cup of tea.

Admiral Sir Charles Bright's seafaring days are over and according to society, that must mean he's in need of a wife (famous line from PRIDE AND PREJUDICE). Charles Bright has two older, domineering sisters who are throwing eligible females his way. Charles thinks he can do a better job; he has agreed to meet a young woman (sister to one of his sea companions) at The Drake and marry.

Charles obviously doesnt think much of his intended; he refers to her as The Mouse. When The Mouse fails to appear, Charles looks around and sees an attractive, (if shabbily dressed) woman who is obviously in some difficulty. The waiter wants to throw her out; she is drinking her tea as slowly as possible.

Charles strikes up a conversation with her and tells her his plight. He makes her an offer of a marriage of convenience. Sally sees at once that it would be a solution short of the workhouse but declines. She leaves and looks for a quiet place to spend the night. As she is making herself comfortable in a pew of a local church, Charles arrives and sits nearby. He renews his offer and Sally reluctantly agrees.

Both of the main characters are well-drawn and are extremely likeable; Charles is a wit and Sally has a good sense of humor and a strong sense of humility and humanity. They fit well together.

However, Sally has a desperate secret and she decides not to tell Charles until later. She does tell Charles that she was married before and had a son (who died because she could not earn enough to keep her small son warm). She also tells Charles that her husband committed suicide.

When someone mentions suicide, most polite folks immediately drop the subject. Thus, Charles does not know the reason for the suicide. This is a warm and gentle story; however I had a problem with all the crying (men, women and children). On the positive side, Mrs. Kelly gives an accurate view of the child abuse and anti-Semitism that was part of Regency life in England.


After All (Cassidy Family, Bk 1)
After All (Cassidy Family, Bk 1)
Author: Jill Marie Landis
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 47
Review Date: 5/29/2015


Weary of the customers at the Palace of Venus Saloon, dance-hall performer Eva Eberhart wants out; she wants respectability. She decides to apply for the job of housekeeper at the Trails End Ranch, in Last Chance, Montana.

Creating a new past, Eva arrives at the ranch looking every inch a lady. However, ranch owner Chase Cassidy, is unsure that Eva is up to the task. Part of the housekeepers job is to handle a difficult teen nephew, Lane, also living at the ranch. Cassidy is desperate and agrees to give Eva the opportunity to prove herself.

What Eva does not know at this point is that Cassidy is also trying to escape his past; he was a dangerous gunslinger and spent time in prison. Chases neighbors are displeased to have such a man in their midst. The nephew in this story (who will star in the next story, LAST CHANCE), is very troubled and a constant irritant to his uncle.

Years before this story began; Lanes mother was killed in front of him. When Chase came home, he left Lane with a neighbor and rode after the killers. He intended to only be gone a few days; he was absent for more than ten years. This is much of the conflict between uncle and nephew; Lane was abandoned by the only two people in his world.

This is a wonderful story about two adults who dont feel worthy of happiness.

Cassidy Family
1. After All (1995)
2. Last Chance (1995)


After I'm Gone (Audio CD) (Unabridged)
After I'm Gone (Audio CD) (Unabridged)
Author: Laura Lippman, Linda Emond (Narrator)
Book Type: Audio CD
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
 4
Review Date: 5/21/2014
Helpful Score: 1


It pains me to admit how many times I tossed this book aside; I found the way Laura Lippman moved the story -- forward and backward, then to a midpoint, constantly moving the story and time -- to be disconcerting. After awhile, it simply became irritating.

The other problem I had with this story is that I didnt really care for any of the characters. The story begins about the time Felix Brewer was convicted and about to go to prison. Instead, he abandons his wife and 3 daughters and escapes the country for parts unknown. Much of the rest of the story is how beautiful Bernadette "Bambi" Gottschalk Brewer and daughters and friends survive without him.

The only character I felt marginally interested in was the wronged wife, Bambi. Felix always had a swarm of lovers around him; he took care of his latest paramour, Julie, by giving her a business.

His wife was left destitute but she refused to accept Felix was gone and never filed for his life insurance or veterans benefits. Instead, she kept up appearances in the huge home she and Felix bought even though she did not have the resources to do so.

Their three daughters were some of the most pathetic specimens in modern fiction. I found little/nothing to admire about them individually or as a group. They seemed to be hateful harpies.

I havent really enjoyed the last two Lippman books much {AND WHEN SHE WAS GOOD (2012) and AFTER I'M GONE (2014)}. Laura Lippman has been one of my favorite authors, but I think shes heading in a direction where I dont plan to follow. This makes two books filled with unlikeable characters doing who cares kinds of things.


After the Parade (Dolan Brothers, Bk 5)
After the Parade (Dolan Brothers, Bk 5)
Author: Dorothy Garlock
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 53
Review Date: 5/29/2014
Helpful Score: 1


This book is 5th and last of the Dolan Brothers series. I generally pass on stories taking place during the years between the two World Wars; I just cannot muster much interest. However, this series as a whole and this book -- are absolutely wonderful.

AFTER THE PARADE is a continuation of Johnny and Katherine Henrys story (WITH HEART). During the span of time between these two books, Johnny and Katherine have had a baby girl. She was born with no hope of living and Johnny blamed himself (he was Mud Creek trash).

Katherine was devastated by Johnnys coldness and his insistence that she get a divorce while he went to war. The story opens as Johnny is returning to Oklahoma as a hero. He learns rather quickly that Katherine has not gotten the divorce.

It is perfectly obvious that these 2 people are still in love but both are too proud to apologize to the other. Things continue to go downhill until Katherine finally finds herself at the lawyers office.

This book is a tour de force because many of the characters in the previous 4 installments either reappear or are mentioned in this story. The author did a lovely job of updating readers of the changes the families experienced.

I cant find anything to complain about this book other than I wish there were another one coming. Beautifully written with distinct characterizations are two things a reader can expect from this author. Ms. Garlock outdid herself; shes also captured a bygone era.


After the Parade (Wheeler Large Print Book Series (Cloth))
After the Parade (Wheeler Large Print Book Series (Cloth))
Author: Dorothy Garlock
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 3
Review Date: 11/9/2013


This book is 5th and last of the Dolan Brothers series. I generally pass on stories taking place during the years between the two World Wars; I just cannot muster much interest. However, this series as a whole and this book -- are absolutely wonderful.

AFTER THE PARADE is a continuation of Johnny and Katherine Henrys story (WITH HEART). During the span of time between these two books, Johnny and Katherine have had a baby girl. She was born with no hope of living and Johnny blamed himself (he was Mud Creek trash).

Katherine was devastated by Johnnys coldness and his insistence that she get a divorce while he went to war. The story opens as Johnny is returning to Oklahoma as a hero. He learns rather quickly that Katherine has not gotten the divorce.

It is perfectly obvious that these 2 people are still in love but both are too proud to apologize to the other. Things continue to go downhill until Katherine finally finds herself at the lawyers office.

This book is a tour de force because many of the characters in the previous 4 installments either reappear or are mentioned in this story. The author did a lovely job of updating readers of the changes the families experienced.

I cant find anything to complain about this book other than I wish there were another one coming. Beautifully written with distinct characterizations are two things a reader can expect from this author. Ms. Garlock outdid herself; shes also captured a bygone era.


All a Woman Wants
All a Woman Wants
Author: Patricia Rice
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
  • Currently 3.6/5 Stars.
 39
Review Date: 6/2/2015


Spinster Bea Cavendish has a problem; her father has died, leaving a heavily-mortgaged estate to his only daughter. She has no idea how to run things because her domineering father felt women were to be dependent and cloistered away from the world. Things are spiraling out of control quickly and Bea has no idea how to stop it.

Scottish-American Lachlan Warwick MacTavish, while on leave from sea travel, went to see his married sister. Instead, he found two children being abused and neglected; Lachlans sister had died and her debauched husband had left the children in the care of others. MacTavish promptly took both children from the home, looking for a nanny to care for them until he could take them to Virginia.

Instead of finding the nanny he was seeking (she had recently died), MacTavish met Bea. Bea and MacTavish agree to help each other; she will help with his four-year-old nephew and infant niece. In exchange, MacTavish will teach Bea what she needs to learn about running an estate. Mac and the children will reside in a small house on the property until he sets sail again.

Mac neglects to tell Bea that he has kidnapped the children from their self-indulgent father, the Viscount Simmons. As Bea and Mac work together, their romance begins. However, there is a huge block to any real attachment: Mac intends to sail back to America and Beas intends to live out her life on her estate.

This is a charming story that moves a bit slowly; the main characters are life-like and complement each other. Their conflict mirrors the changes taking place during that time: The difference between the way things had always been done vs. the wave of the future.


All That Matters
All That Matters
Author: Stef Ann Holm
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 105
Review Date: 6/7/2017


Contemporary romance isn't usually my genre but I took a chance and am glad I did. A word of warning, this is the middle book of a trilogy (see below).

Boise is home to Chloe Lawson, owner of a gourmet bakery, smack dab in the middle of the best section in town. Then she is informed that her lease has been terminated; the biggest grocery chain in town will take over a large swath of the growing complex.

Chloe started her career at that grocery 'fakery' and knows their products cannot compare to hers. She decides to take legal action and meets John Moretti, a lawyer who tells Chloe she doesn't have a chance.

John Moretti, a widower with kid problems, grapples with the loss of his wife and his growing sense of despair and loneliness. The secondary romance in this novel seemed superfluous and seemed to detract from Chloe and John.


Moretti Trilogy
All the Right Angles (2007)
**All That Matters (2008)
All That You Are (2009)


Allie's Moon
Allie's Moon
Author: Alexis Harrington
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 22
Review Date: 8/2/2015


This unique story was a page-turner. Allie is a mid-twenties spinster who has dedicated her life to her younger sister, Olivia. The younger Ford sister seems to have tantrums, seizures and a fragile constitution. The sisters were generally known as, "the crazy Ford sisters." The reader soon learns that Allie is a quiet, patient person of strength.

Jeff Hicks has just about hit bottom; not too long ago, she was the sheriff of this small Oregon town. However, he shot a teen in the line of his duty; he's and dropped into the bottom of a liquor bottle and stayed there for a couple of years. Now, he's been caught in a petty theft and his punishment is to work off his sentence as free labor on Allie Ford's farm (which is falling down around her ears).

Other than some repetition, this is a well-written book with some interesting secrets. To explain this rating, I would have to explain the secrets that would ruin the book for a reader. Let me just say that the outcome was a bit too pat.


Almost Eden
Almost Eden
Author: Dorothy Garlock
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 8
Review Date: 3/25/2013


This is one strange book! The action and adventure was great; Maggie was something else again. In some ways, it seemed more like a fantasy than flesh-and-blood people. I simply could not believe that Light did not consider the serious problem Maggie would have if he died - until well into the story!

Maggie wasn't real. Period. Light was fascinating and they seemed evenly matched (neither was a darling of the people who surrounded them; Maggie was considered a witch; Light, as a child of a white man and an Indian woman, was never accepted by either race).

The story between Eli and Aee was more interesting in many ways than that of the main characters; they seemed real. Perhaps Eli said it best when he told Aee that he loved her because she was strong and could take care of many things ... Maggie would always have to have someone take care of her.

There were flashes of humanity in Maggie when she admitted to Light that she hadn't known much about birthing until they spent the winter at the MacMillan's house. She also tried to learn useful womanly tasks while with the MacMillan's.

I liked the conflict between Eli and Light. The reader didn't understand the problem until just before Eli explained it to Light. How Eli got the info was a bit far-fetched, but Garlock handled the rest of this segment of the story well.

The closing scene was ...'dumber than dirt.' Talk about convenient; it ruined the story for me!

Annie Lash
1. Wild Sweet Wilderness (1985)
2. Annie Lash (1985)
3. Almost Eden (1995)


Almost Eden (Annie Lash, Bk 3)
Almost Eden (Annie Lash, Bk 3)
Author: Dorothy Garlock
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 28
Review Date: 1/24/2013


This is one strange book! The action and adventure were great; Maggie was something else again. In some ways, it seemed more like a fantasy than flesh-and-blood people. I simply could not believe that Light did not consider the serious problem Maggie would have if he died until well into the story!

Maggie wasnt real. Period. Light was fascinating and they seemed evenly matched (neither was a darling of the people who surrounded them; Maggie was considered a witch; Light, as a child of a white man and an Indian woman, was never accepted by either race).

The story between Eli and Aee was more interesting in many ways than that of the main characters; they seemed real. Perhaps Eli said it best when he told Aee that he loved her because she was strong and could take care of many things Maggie would always have to have someone take care of her.

There were flashes of humanity in Maggie when she admitted to Light that she hadnt known much about birthing until they spent the winter at the MacMillans house. She also tried to learn useful womanly tasks while with the MacMillans.

I liked the conflict between Eli and Light. The reader didnt understand the problem until just before Eli explained it to Light. How Eli got the info was a bit far-fetched, but Garlock handled the rest of this segment of the story well.

The closing scene was unbelievable! Talk about convenient; it ruined the story for me!

Annie Lash
1. Wild Sweet Wilderness (1985)
2. Annie Lash (1985)
3. Almost Eden (1995)


Almost Eden (Audio Cassette)
Almost Eden (Audio Cassette)
Author: Dorothy Garlock, Carrie Gordon Lowrey (Narrator)
Book Type: Audio Cassette
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 2
Review Date: 4/1/2013


This is one strange book! The action and adventure was great; Maggie was something else again. In some ways, it seemed more like a fantasy than flesh-and-blood people. I simply could not believe that Light did not consider the serious problem Maggie would have if he died - until well into the story!

Maggie wasn't real. Period. Light was fascinating and they seemed evenly matched (neither was a darling of the people who surrounded them; Maggie was considered a witch; Light, as a child of a white man and an Indian woman, was never accepted by either race).

The story between Eli and Aee was more interesting in many ways than that of the main characters; they seemed real. Perhaps Eli said it best when he told Aee that he loved her because she was strong and could take care of many things ... Maggie would always have to have someone take care of her.

There were flashes of humanity in Maggie when she admitted to Light that she hadn't known much about birthing until they spent the winter at the MacMillan's house. She also tried to learn useful womanly tasks while with the MacMillan's.

I liked the conflict between Eli and Light. The reader didn't understand the problem until just before Eli explained it to Light. How Eli got the info was a bit far-fetched, but Garlock handled the rest of this segment of the story well.

The closing scene was ...'dumber than dirt.' Talk about convenient; it ruined the story for me!

Annie Lash
1. Wild Sweet Wilderness (1985)
2. Annie Lash (1985)
3. Almost Eden (1995)


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