Julia B. (flyfshrgrl) - - Reviews

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The Confession
The Confession
Author: John Grisham
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 232
Review Date: 7/9/2011
Helpful Score: 1


What a waste of a credit and time! What a disapointment that Grisham uses this novel to stereotype everyone and every thing that Grisham dislikes about actual life.

In the hopes of the phenomena that circulated Dan Brown's novel THE DAVINCI CODE will do the same with THE CONFESSION, Grisham uses this fiction story to promulgate his anti-death penalty campaign, that everyone from Texas is a gun-toting, wreckless idiot; that race relations will always be divided in the South, that the Baptist faith is comprised of nothing but zealots, and that someone else is to blame for a person's wanton behavior.

Capitalizing on his past popularity at having written good fiction, Grisham tarnishes his reputation with this novel, because it is nothing but a soapbox overloaded with every conceivable literary convetion previously written. Grisham's THE INNOCENT MAN was well-written, thought-provoking, and did a much better job of advertising Grisham's anti-death penalty campagin, but then, that was a true story, not one so contrived and forced as is evident in this latest novel.

I have read every one of Grisham's published works as soon as they were released. I am glad that I did not waste my money on this novel, only losing a credit, which I feel I can recover. Where I have never questioned whether I would read Grisham's latest publication, I doubt I will read Grisham's any further works.


King's Gold (Knights Templar)
King's Gold (Knights Templar)
Author: Michael Jecks
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 4.8/5 Stars.
 2
Review Date: 7/28/2011
Helpful Score: 1


Jecks creatively brings everyone together in this novel, which begins where "The Bishop Must Die" leaves off. Woven into this story are several plots--which Edward will ascend to the throne; who will the Bardi banks support--Edward II or his son and proclaimed king by Mortimer and Queen Isabella; who murders a vill's yeoman; who continues support for Edward II, and who wants to see him dead?

Historical research plays a key role into Jecks' success with his Templar Series, and King's Gold is no exception. Jecks describes characters and places in vivid detail, so that their greed, agony, and loyalty are keenly felt by the reader, as well. King's Gold addresses the end of Edward II's reign with compassion and stays true to the historical fact that no one knows when or how Edward II, regardless Edward's public funeral of 1327, died. Similarly, events for the 31st novel of the series are also set in play. Another excellent 14th century tale!


Maisie Dobbs (Maisie Dobbs, Bk 1)
Maisie Dobbs (Maisie Dobbs, Bk 1)
Author: Jacqueline Winspear
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 349
Review Date: 7/22/2011


Jacqueline Winspear deserved all the awards she won with this title! Winspear created vibrant and realistic characters who live in a time where society struggles to adapt to the deluge of changes brought about by the Great War. Accurately weaving in the early 20th century's turbulent history, Winspear successfully unfolds several plots in her first mystery novel.

Maisie Dobbs, the daughter of a costermonger, uses her gifted intellect to cross social lines and move from being a scullery maid to owning her own investigative business where she is Psychologist and Investigator. Her first case, a seemingly ordinary question of infidelity, leads Maisie on an even greater journey where Maisie must revisit a past she had locked deep inside. With dear friends and family by her side, Maisie Dobbs discovers the truth about not only her past, but the dark secrets the Great War has created for many others, too.


Treason at Lisson Grove (Charlotte and Thomas Pitt, Bk 26)
Treason at Lisson Grove (Charlotte and Thomas Pitt, Bk 26)
Author: Anne Perry
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 23
Review Date: 7/7/2011


The three-year hiatus was worth the wait! This has to be one of Perry's finest Charlotte and Thomas Pitt novels. Perry introduces a new depth to familiar characters, has us traversing Western Europe, and cleverly entwines history within the story.

Special Branch must foil an internationl plot, but they have to do it without Victor Narraway and Thomas Pitt. Pitt chases the assassin of his would-be informant to France's northwest coast. Narraway, dismissed for embezzlement, travels to Ireland hoping to discover who betrayed him. Meanwhile, Charlotte takes great risks to save her family.

Will Special Branch survive? Will the British realm endure? Can Narraway recover his job? Can Pitt save his job? Will this be the end of Charlotte and Thomas Pitt? Only time and subtle sleuthing will tell.


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