Saba S. (broucek) - Reviews

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America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It
America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It
Author: Mark Steyn
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 10
Review Date: 11/25/2009


Product Description
This title is the "New York Times" bestseller - now in paperback. In "America Alone", Mark Steyn uses his trademark wit, clarity of thought and flair for the apocalyptic, Mark Steyn to argue that America is the only hope against Islamic Terrorism. Steyn addresses the singular position in which America finds itself, surrounded by anti-Americanism on all sides. He gives us the brutal facts on these threats and why there is no choice but for America to fight for the cause of freedom - alone.


From the Inside Flap
It's the end of the world as we know it...
Someday soon, you might wake up to the call to prayer from a muezzin. Europeans already are. And liberals will still tell you that "diversity is our strength"--while Talibanic enforcers cruise Greenwich Village burning books and barber shops, the Supreme Court decides sharia law doesn't violate the "separation of church and state," and the Hollywood Left decides to give up on gay rights in favor of the much safer charms of polygamy. If you think this can't happen, you haven't been paying attention, as the hilarious, provocative, and brilliant Mark Steyn--the most popular conservative columnist in the English-speaking world--shows to devastating effect. The future, as Steyn shows, belongs to the fecund and the confident. And the Islamists are both, while the West is looking ever more like the ruins of a civilization. But America can survive, prosper, and defend its freedom only if it continues to believe in itself, in the sturdier virtues of self-reliance (not government), in the centrality of family, and in the conviction that our country really is the world's last best hope. Mark Steyn's America Alone is laugh-out-loud funny--but it will also change the way you look at the world.


American Jezebel : The Uncommon Life of Anne Hutchinson, the Woman Who Defied the Puritans
Review Date: 11/25/2013


Pasted from Amazon:
82 of 89 people found the following review helpful
By Beacon .... July 15, 2007

I'm mystified by the rave reviews here. Hutchinson is indeed a fascinating figure, but LaPlante's oddly-arranged book obscures more than it illuminates. LaPlante presents Hutchinson as a proto-feminist rather than a zealous religious dissident. Although LaPlante acknowledges that Hutchinson exhibited as much moral certitude as her prosecutors -- she believed, for example, that she could personally identify those chosen for salvation by God -- most of the book either downplays the significance of theological dispute in favor of gender politics (suggesting, e.g., that John Winthrop was principally motivated by a desire to keep women in their place), or twists itself into knots trying to recast arch-Calvinist Antinomianism as a progressive movement. Incredibly, there is no serious discussion of theology until 50 pages into the book.

Gender is naturally central to this story. After all, its protagonist is a woman in seventeenth century Boston who brazenly challenged the city's Cambridge-educated male elite. But the reason for Hutchinson's banishment -- like that of the more influential and sophisticated Roger Williams a few years earlier -- was theological, and the faith of Hutchinson and her slippery mentor John Cotton (grandfather of Cotton Mather) was no more rational and no less fanatical than that of John Winthrop, whose conciliatory tendencies actually marked him as a rather moderate fellow by Puritan standards. Unlike Williams, whose radical separatism led him to become one of the first notable advocates of religious freedom, Hutchinson was primarily concerned not with political liberty but with denouncing those who she believed to be under a "covenant of works." This category included all the ministers in Massachusetts except for Cotton and her brother-in-law, John Wheelwright.

LaPlante does not seem to be an expert on Puritan New England, and she has trouble with theology. To give one example, she employs "orthodox" as a general term of abuse -- using it at one point to describe the Puritans' Anglican opponents in England, and at others to describe the Puritan leadership in Boston. Like Howard Zinn, who blurbs the book, she seems to view underdog status as an indication of righteousness. A reader who is more interested in ideas than identity politics will note that Hutchinson's Antinomian theology was no more enlightened than that of her "orthodox" enemies; she was ahead of her time only in her belief that women are as able to interpret scripture as men (no small matter), and in her relatively humane views regarding Native Americans (which she shared with Williams and Samuel Sewall, among others).

Of course, historical figures should not be chastised for every transgression against contemporary sensibilities. But as someone with no dog in the fight between the varieties of seventeenth century English Protestantism, I was irritated by LaPlante's verbal gymnastics on behalf of her ancestor -- especially after she declares in the intro that her work will avoid the "exaltation" found elsewhere. While the reader gets some sense of Hutchinson's admirable qualities, including her sparkling intelligence and stubborn bravery, critical analysis is limited to the occasional throw-away sentence, and the book contains little psychological insight. LaPlante has thus transformed a strange charismatic figure into a cardboard cutout. LaPlante is not, thankfully, the sort of historian who simply dismisses all Puritans as benighted and backwards, but she makes an equally serious mistake in attempting to transform a proud, complex, and extraordinarily devout woman into a digestible hero for contemporary readers.

Three final points: (1) LaPlante has a habit of substituting her own language for that of her subjects, making it hard to determine who is saying what. Quotes sometimes end abruptly, replaced by LaPlante's paraphrasing. I suspected at several points that her summaries were generous to Hutchinson (facilitating Hutchinson's transformation into a Puritan Susan B. Anthony), and less than charitable to her prosecutors. The book is at its best when LaPlante isn't speaking at all, since her commentary adds little to the natural drama. (2) The general tenor of the book is hagiographic. Many of the quotes that LaPlante culls from other histories of the era seem to have been included only because they are complimentary of Hutchinson. LaPlante defends her subject in an almost lawerly fashion, informing us, for example, that "Harvard University" credits Hutchinson with its founding (in fact, one Harvard professor!), and that Hutchinson founded Rhode Island (only technically true, since Williams had established Providence Plantations a year earlier). These are minor details, but combined with the suspicious paraphrasing, they undermined my trust in the author's intentions. An honest defense of Hutchinson would have been fine, but this book seems to lionize its subject using sleight of hand. (3) I learned some things from "American Jezebel" that I had not found in other books on this period. Particularly interesting were LaPlante's discussions of Lincolnshire and Boston, England.

For better books on pre-Revolutionary New England, I recommend Philbrick's Mayflower, Morgan's Puritan Dilemma (on Winthrop), Gaustad's Roger Williams, Lepore's The Name of War (flawed, but erudite and beautifully written), and Richard Francis' wonderful book on Samuel Sewall. American Jezebel isn't worthless, and may be a decent intro to this subject for younger readers, but it would be unfortunate if anyone picked up their whole education on the Puritans here -- as many of the other Amazon reviewers seem to have done.


The Avenger (Time Raiders, Bk 3) (Silhouette Nocturne, No 73)
The Avenger (Time Raiders, Bk 3) (Silhouette Nocturne, No 73)
Author: P.C. Cast
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 9
Review Date: 1/24/2010
Helpful Score: 1


Product Description
For Alexandra Patton, the Time Raiders project sends the reluctant psychic back to 60 AD Britonâa world where she can barely understand the accents, let alone its culture of brutality and superstition. Armed only with her "freakish" ability to talk to the dead, Alex must use all her gifts to entice Caradoc, a savagely sexy Druid warrior, into helping her succeed in her mission.
What they discover along the way is pure passion.

Now, torn between duty and the man of her dreams, should Alex return home if given the chance? Or dare she risk everything to begin anew in this strange and mystical land?


MY NOTES:
The Time Raiders send psychic Alexandra Patton back to 60 A.D. so that she can bring back part of the medallion that will enable Earth to join the alliance of other space-traveling planets. Alex loathes the brutal feral behavior of her hosts; as she speaks to the dead who often are victims of atrocities.

Alex pretends to be a soul speaker priestess to the goddess Andraste when she and Queen Boudica's Druidic cousin Caradoc meet and are attracted to one another. As she falls in love, he helps her adjust to ancient times. However, she knows that Boudica will die in the battle for Londinium, but fears Caradoc will too though she does not know for certain.

The third Time Raiders romantic suspense thriller (see The Seeker by Lindsay McKenna and The Slayer by Cindy Dees) is an entertaining tale that hooks readers from the opening dialogue between Alex and the dead but restful Andred and keeps the audience's attention throughout. The spin to the exciting story line is what the time traveler knows about ancient Britannia and does not as Alex fears her beloved will die alongside his famous warrior cousin. This tale and the saga are winners due to a strong casting leading to readers wanting to accompany the heroes on their treks back in time to find the medallion segments and love.


'Believing Women' in Islam: Unreading Patriarchal Interpretations of the Quran
Review Date: 2/24/2014


Trash! ...A pro Muslim propaganda at its best!


Best Loved Fairy Tales: Including Mother Goose Selections With Helpful Guide For Parents
Review Date: 9/6/2013


Despite the 70' look the book is wonderful treasure!


Chthon
Chthon
Author: Piers Anthony
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.3/5 Stars.
 3
Review Date: 2/8/2010


Anthony arrived on the science fiction scene with quite a bang with this novel. So much of a bang that it was nominated for the 1968 Hugo award, losing out on the award itself only to another truly brilliant work, Roger Zelazny's Lord of Light.
Anthony introduces a multitude of ideas in this work: a flower that shows whether or not your significant other truly loves you, a galaxy-spanning `message' that kills humans in its path by hypothermia, a naturally formed inorganic based consciousness, a type of grub that quite literally eats absolutely everything. But the most significant idea is a genetically modified type of human, the minionettes, all physically identical and the very picture of absolute female perfection, who have their emotional circuits inverted, where the kindest thing you can do to them is hate, abuse, deride, and punish them.

Anton Five, knowing nothing of her true nature, has the misfortune to fall in love with one of these minionettes, a love that is an obsession, a mixture of real love and conflicted hate, as the object of his emotions, after only three brief encounters, goes to space. It becomes his mission in life to track her down, even at the expense of his farm and a rejection of freely offered true love by a daughter of the family of Four. And due to this obsession, he eventually is sent to the prison planet Chthon, where the prison is the naturally formed caves and tubes formed by ancient volcanic action and that no one has ever escaped from. Within this prison are real monsters, truly horrifying and very unique, many of which are seen only from offstage or half-seen, and the very indistinctness this lends to these creatures adds to their effect. Some of the images of this section gave me nightmares for years after the first time I read this book.

Anton is a fully delineated character, not very likeable - in fact he's amoral, selfish, a loner, single-minded, and at least something of a psychotic. But there are occasional glimpses of a different man hiding inside, one capable of giving and receiving love, who knows pity and can empathize with other's misfortunes. The story, outside of all the fantastic ideas so casually tossed around, is really about his development into a fully rational human who can allow his emotions full sway when appropriate.

The story construction is rather unique, using both flash-backs and flash-forwards from his time in prison. This is deliberately done, as there are a set of parallels/contrasts between the actions in the prison and the actions at other times in Anton's life, which help illustrate the man and his changes. This construction has the disadvantage of lessening the suspense, but the added meaning given by this structure more than compensates for this. At least part of this book can be viewed as an allegory for the travels of a man through the stages of life, and Anthony buries quite a bit of symbolism inside his creations.

The power of this book resides in the changes Anton goes through and its tremendous imagery coupled with some truly different and unique ideas. Be prepared to put as much effort into reading and comprehending this book as it would take for a classic 'literary' novel - this book is a far cry from the grade-B space-operas of yesteryear.


Chthon
Chthon
Author: Piers Anthony
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 5
Review Date: 2/8/2010


Anthony arrived on the science fiction scene with quite a bang with this novel. So much of a bang that it was nominated for the 1968 Hugo award, losing out on the award itself only to another truly brilliant work, Roger Zelazny's Lord of Light.
Anthony introduces a multitude of ideas in this work: a flower that shows whether or not your significant other truly loves you, a galaxy-spanning `message' that kills humans in its path by hypothermia, a naturally formed inorganic based consciousness, a type of grub that quite literally eats absolutely everything. But the most significant idea is a genetically modified type of human, the minionettes, all physically identical and the very picture of absolute female perfection, who have their emotional circuits inverted, where the kindest thing you can do to them is hate, abuse, deride, and punish them.

Anton Five, knowing nothing of her true nature, has the misfortune to fall in love with one of these minionettes, a love that is an obsession, a mixture of real love and conflicted hate, as the object of his emotions, after only three brief encounters, goes to space. It becomes his mission in life to track her down, even at the expense of his farm and a rejection of freely offered true love by a daughter of the family of Four. And due to this obsession, he eventually is sent to the prison planet Chthon, where the prison is the naturally formed caves and tubes formed by ancient volcanic action and that no one has ever escaped from. Within this prison are real monsters, truly horrifying and very unique, many of which are seen only from offstage or half-seen, and the very indistinctness this lends to these creatures adds to their effect. Some of the images of this section gave me nightmares for years after the first time I read this book.

Anton is a fully delineated character, not very likeable - in fact he's amoral, selfish, a loner, single-minded, and at least something of a psychotic. But there are occasional glimpses of a different man hiding inside, one capable of giving and receiving love, who knows pity and can empathize with other's misfortunes. The story, outside of all the fantastic ideas so casually tossed around, is really about his development into a fully rational human who can allow his emotions full sway when appropriate.

The story construction is rather unique, using both flash-backs and flash-forwards from his time in prison. This is deliberately done, as there are a set of parallels/contrasts between the actions in the prison and the actions at other times in Anton's life, which help illustrate the man and his changes. This construction has the disadvantage of lessening the suspense, but the added meaning given by this structure more than compensates for this. At least part of this book can be viewed as an allegory for the travels of a man through the stages of life, and Anthony buries quite a bit of symbolism inside his creations.

The power of this book resides in the changes Anton goes through and its tremendous imagery coupled with some truly different and unique ideas. Be prepared to put as much effort into reading and comprehending this book as it would take for a classic 'literary' novel - this book is a far cry from the grade-B space-operas of yesteryear.


Chthon
Chthon
Author: Piers Anthony
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
 3
Review Date: 2/8/2010


Anthony arrived on the science fiction scene with quite a bang with this novel. So much of a bang that it was nominated for the 1968 Hugo award, losing out on the award itself only to another truly brilliant work, Roger Zelazny's Lord of Light.
Anthony introduces a multitude of ideas in this work: a flower that shows whether or not your significant other truly loves you, a galaxy-spanning `message' that kills humans in its path by hypothermia, a naturally formed inorganic based consciousness, a type of grub that quite literally eats absolutely everything. But the most significant idea is a genetically modified type of human, the minionettes, all physically identical and the very picture of absolute female perfection, who have their emotional circuits inverted, where the kindest thing you can do to them is hate, abuse, deride, and punish them.

Anton Five, knowing nothing of her true nature, has the misfortune to fall in love with one of these minionettes, a love that is an obsession, a mixture of real love and conflicted hate, as the object of his emotions, after only three brief encounters, goes to space. It becomes his mission in life to track her down, even at the expense of his farm and a rejection of freely offered true love by a daughter of the family of Four. And due to this obsession, he eventually is sent to the prison planet Chthon, where the prison is the naturally formed caves and tubes formed by ancient volcanic action and that no one has ever escaped from. Within this prison are real monsters, truly horrifying and very unique, many of which are seen only from offstage or half-seen, and the very indistinctness this lends to these creatures adds to their effect. Some of the images of this section gave me nightmares for years after the first time I read this book.

Anton is a fully delineated character, not very likeable - in fact he's amoral, selfish, a loner, single-minded, and at least something of a psychotic. But there are occasional glimpses of a different man hiding inside, one capable of giving and receiving love, who knows pity and can empathize with other's misfortunes. The story, outside of all the fantastic ideas so casually tossed around, is really about his development into a fully rational human who can allow his emotions full sway when appropriate.

The story construction is rather unique, using both flash-backs and flash-forwards from his time in prison. This is deliberately done, as there are a set of parallels/contrasts between the actions in the prison and the actions at other times in Anton's life, which help illustrate the man and his changes. This construction has the disadvantage of lessening the suspense, but the added meaning given by this structure more than compensates for this. At least part of this book can be viewed as an allegory for the travels of a man through the stages of life, and Anthony buries quite a bit of symbolism inside his creations.

The power of this book resides in the changes Anton goes through and its tremendous imagery coupled with some truly different and unique ideas. Be prepared to put as much effort into reading and comprehending this book as it would take for a classic 'literary' novel - this book is a far cry from the grade-B space-operas of yesteryear.


Chthon (Aton, Bk 1)
Chthon (Aton, Bk 1)
Author: Piers Anthony
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
 6
Review Date: 2/8/2010


Anthony arrived on the science fiction scene with quite a bang with this novel. So much of a bang that it was nominated for the 1968 Hugo award, losing out on the award itself only to another truly brilliant work, Roger Zelazny's Lord of Light.
Anthony introduces a multitude of ideas in this work: a flower that shows whether or not your significant other truly loves you, a galaxy-spanning `message' that kills humans in its path by hypothermia, a naturally formed inorganic based consciousness, a type of grub that quite literally eats absolutely everything. But the most significant idea is a genetically modified type of human, the minionettes, all physically identical and the very picture of absolute female perfection, who have their emotional circuits inverted, where the kindest thing you can do to them is hate, abuse, deride, and punish them.

Anton Five, knowing nothing of her true nature, has the misfortune to fall in love with one of these minionettes, a love that is an obsession, a mixture of real love and conflicted hate, as the object of his emotions, after only three brief encounters, goes to space. It becomes his mission in life to track her down, even at the expense of his farm and a rejection of freely offered true love by a daughter of the family of Four. And due to this obsession, he eventually is sent to the prison planet Chthon, where the prison is the naturally formed caves and tubes formed by ancient volcanic action and that no one has ever escaped from. Within this prison are real monsters, truly horrifying and very unique, many of which are seen only from offstage or half-seen, and the very indistinctness this lends to these creatures adds to their effect. Some of the images of this section gave me nightmares for years after the first time I read this book.

Anton is a fully delineated character, not very likeable - in fact he's amoral, selfish, a loner, single-minded, and at least something of a psychotic. But there are occasional glimpses of a different man hiding inside, one capable of giving and receiving love, who knows pity and can empathize with other's misfortunes. The story, outside of all the fantastic ideas so casually tossed around, is really about his development into a fully rational human who can allow his emotions full sway when appropriate.

The story construction is rather unique, using both flash-backs and flash-forwards from his time in prison. This is deliberately done, as there are a set of parallels/contrasts between the actions in the prison and the actions at other times in Anton's life, which help illustrate the man and his changes. This construction has the disadvantage of lessening the suspense, but the added meaning given by this structure more than compensates for this. At least part of this book can be viewed as an allegory for the travels of a man through the stages of life, and Anthony buries quite a bit of symbolism inside his creations.

The power of this book resides in the changes Anton goes through and its tremendous imagery coupled with some truly different and unique ideas. Be prepared to put as much effort into reading and comprehending this book as it would take for a classic 'literary' novel - this book is a far cry from the grade-B space-operas of yesteryear.


Chthon (Aton, Bk 1)
Chthon (Aton, Bk 1)
Author: Piers Anthony
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
 20
Review Date: 2/8/2010


Anthony arrived on the science fiction scene with quite a bang with this novel. So much of a bang that it was nominated for the 1968 Hugo award, losing out on the award itself only to another truly brilliant work, Roger Zelazny's Lord of Light.
Anthony introduces a multitude of ideas in this work: a flower that shows whether or not your significant other truly loves you, a galaxy-spanning `message' that kills humans in its path by hypothermia, a naturally formed inorganic based consciousness, a type of grub that quite literally eats absolutely everything. But the most significant idea is a genetically modified type of human, the minionettes, all physically identical and the very picture of absolute female perfection, who have their emotional circuits inverted, where the kindest thing you can do to them is hate, abuse, deride, and punish them.

Anton Five, knowing nothing of her true nature, has the misfortune to fall in love with one of these minionettes, a love that is an obsession, a mixture of real love and conflicted hate, as the object of his emotions, after only three brief encounters, goes to space. It becomes his mission in life to track her down, even at the expense of his farm and a rejection of freely offered true love by a daughter of the family of Four. And due to this obsession, he eventually is sent to the prison planet Chthon, where the prison is the naturally formed caves and tubes formed by ancient volcanic action and that no one has ever escaped from. Within this prison are real monsters, truly horrifying and very unique, many of which are seen only from offstage or half-seen, and the very indistinctness this lends to these creatures adds to their effect. Some of the images of this section gave me nightmares for years after the first time I read this book.

Anton is a fully delineated character, not very likeable - in fact he's amoral, selfish, a loner, single-minded, and at least something of a psychotic. But there are occasional glimpses of a different man hiding inside, one capable of giving and receiving love, who knows pity and can empathize with other's misfortunes. The story, outside of all the fantastic ideas so casually tossed around, is really about his development into a fully rational human who can allow his emotions full sway when appropriate.

The story construction is rather unique, using both flash-backs and flash-forwards from his time in prison. This is deliberately done, as there are a set of parallels/contrasts between the actions in the prison and the actions at other times in Anton's life, which help illustrate the man and his changes. This construction has the disadvantage of lessening the suspense, but the added meaning given by this structure more than compensates for this. At least part of this book can be viewed as an allegory for the travels of a man through the stages of life, and Anthony buries quite a bit of symbolism inside his creations.

The power of this book resides in the changes Anton goes through and its tremendous imagery coupled with some truly different and unique ideas. Be prepared to put as much effort into reading and comprehending this book as it would take for a classic 'literary' novel - this book is a far cry from the grade-B space-operas of yesteryear.


The Complete Infidel's Guide to the Koran
Review Date: 3/16/2010
Helpful Score: 1


Product Description
Written in an extremely accessible style by bestselling author Robert Spencer, "The Complete Infidel's Guide to the Koran" is a fact-based but light-hearted look at the key elements, values, and beliefs in the Koran.
From the Inside Flap
The Koran: It may be the most controversial book in the world. Some see it as a paean to peace, others call it a violent mandate for worldwide Islamic supremacy.
How can one book lead to such dramatically different conclusions? New York Times bestselling author Robert Spencer reveals the truth in The Complete Infidel's Guide to the Koran: not many Westerners know what's in the Koran, since so few have actually read it -- even among the legions of politicians, diplomats, analysts, and editorial writers who vehemently insist that the Koran preaches tolerance.

Now, Spencer unveils the mysteries lying behind this powerful book, guiding readers through the controversies surrounding the Koran's origins and its most contentious passages. Stripping out the obsolete debates, Spencer focuses on the Koran's decrees toward Jews, Christians, and other Infidels, explaining how they were viewed in Muhammad's time, what they've supposedly done wrong, and most important, what the Koran has in store for them.


Dark Solstice
Dark Solstice
Author: Kaitlyn O'Connor
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 11
Review Date: 2/10/2010


Product Description
Dr. Rhea Landon knew she'd been thrown into Phobos Prison to die. The most notorious prison in the solar system and one from which there was no escape, Phobos Prison housed the most dangerous predators in the solar system-and the few who survived more than a year were the worst of the worst.
Dragged into the arena where the warden held 'gladiator' games for the entertainment of the staff and inmates, she was stripped naked and chained to a post-offered up as a prize to the winner-the meanest brute among them.

When the dust settled, the iceman, John Raathe, was the last man standing.


Elementals
Elementals
Author: Peter Dickinson, Robin McKinley
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 4
Review Date: 2/10/2010


Product Description
Six magical, fantasy tales from two major award-winning authors The shriek of the wind, calling the waters to rebel - and a silver man from the sea with a voice like the roar of a seashell...A long-told story of the sea people and their song - and a golden eye, glittering in a pool at the edge of a desert...A ferocious serpent, its body as thick as the trunk of a large tree - and the immense, unknowable Kraken, dark beyond black, cold beyond ice, waking on the ocean floor...A mesmerising collection of short stories inspired by the element of Water - readers will be swept away by the superb storytelling skills of two major award-winning authors.


Ender's Game (Ender Quartet)
Ender's Game (Ender Quartet)
Author: Orson Scott Card
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 4.3/5 Stars.
 189
Review Date: 7/29/2009


For the 20th anniversary of Card's Hugo and Nebula Awardwinning novel, Audio Renaissance brings to life the story of child genius Ender Wiggin, who must save the world from malevolent alien "buggers." In his afterword, Card declares, "The ideal presentation of any book of mine is to have excellent actors perform it in audio-only format," and he gets his wish. Much of the story is internal dialogue, and each narrator reads the sections told from the point of view of a particular character, rather than taking on a part as if it were a play. Card's phenomenal emotional depth comes through in the quiet, carefully paced speech of each performer. No narrator tries overmuch to create separate character voices, though each is clearly discernible, and the understated delivery will draw in listeners. In particular, Rudnicki, with his lulling, sonorous voice, does a fine job articulating Ender's inner struggle between the kind, peaceful boy he wants to be and the savage, violent actions he is frequently forced to take. This is a wonderful way to experience Card's best-known and most celebrated work, both for longtime fans and for newcomers.


Eurabia: The Euro-Arab Axis
Eurabia: The Euro-Arab Axis
Author: Bat Ye'or
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
 1
Review Date: 3/16/2010


Review
Eurabia is one of the most significant books of the current generation. -- Dennis Prager, KRLA, February 22, 2005
Product Description
This provocative and disturbing book is about the transformation of Europe into "Eurabia," a cultural and political appendage of the Arab/Muslim world. Eurabia is fundamentally anti-Christian, anti-Western, anti-American, and antisemitic, while striving for Israel's disappearance and the vilification and isolation of America. The institution responsible for this transformation, and that continues to propagate its ideological message, is the Euro-Arab Dialogue, developed by European and Arab politicians and intellectuals over the past thirty years. With all the drama of a master writer, Bat Ye'or presents a wide range of historical and contemporary documents and facts to tell the story of how the European Union is being subverted by Islamic hostility to the very ethics and values of Europe itself. Readers who seek a fair resolution of the Arab-Israel conflict will be shocked by the evidence produced in these pages of unfair pressures and deliberate distortions. Europe's independence of spirit is shown in the process of being undermined. This book challenges the current demonization of Israel and should be essential reading for everyone interested in true peace in the Middle East


Fire: Tales of Elemental Spirits
Fire: Tales of Elemental Spirits
Author: Robin McKinley, Peter Dickinson
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 3.6/5 Stars.
 7
Review Date: 2/10/2010
Helpful Score: 1


The settings of these five tales range from ancient to modern, but they are all united by encounters with magical creatures with an affinity for fire. In "Phoenix," Ellie's love for forests leads her to Dave and Welly, caretakers of the ancient Phoenix, displaced from its Egyptian home to damp, chilly Britain. "Hellhound" features animal-loving Miri, whose choice of a red-eyed shelter dog proves providential when she must face a malevolent spirit. In "Fireworm," Tandin spirit-walks to defeat the fireworm that threatens his clan, though in doing so he develops empathy for the creature and its mate and distances himself from his people. "Salamander Man" finds orphaned Tib caught up in a bewildering chain of events, which results in him taking the form of a flaming giant to free the salamanders and rid his city of corrupt magicians. "First Flight," the longest piece, deals with Ern, who helps a dragon with a missing eye find its way back into the Flame Space, which dragons use to travel quickly through time and space. All of these individuals learn something about themselves in their encounters with the fire beasts, and all are the better for it in the end. This collection of beautifully crafted tales will find a warm welcome from fans of either author, as well as from fantasy readers in general.


Ghost Light
Ghost Light
Author: Rick Hautala
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 10
Review Date: 6/4/2009
Helpful Score: 1


Knowing that her sister's violent death was no accident, Cindy Toland takes her niece and nephew away in the middle of the night to escape their brutal father, but their father is determined to get them back. Original.

Though it has its shades of supernatural, GHOST LIGHT is more of a thriller than horror. Narratively impressive, it deals with the effect of making bad choices and the degree of which one needs to reach to be set free. Between freshly drawn characters and action-packed suspense, Hautala tells a tale of love, responsibility and forgiveness, forgiveness of others, but more importantly of oneself. Adding to the mix a drop of an unearthly apparition and a full-cup of one nasty nasty villain, and you got one exciting read that will surely please seekers of high tension everywhere.


God: A Human History
God: A Human History
Author: Reza Aslan
Book Type: Audio CD
  • Currently 0.5/5 Stars.
 2
Review Date: 10/3/2018


The author wrote about that which he has no knowledge. I only want to address 2 of Mr. Aslan's arguments.
1. That Adam and Eve did not die after eating the fruit of the tree, because, well, they did not die in the physical sense.
Death, as far as the Bible is concerned, never means cessation of living. Death always means "permanent separation", either from "the land of the living", or from God Himself, who is the source of life. Once a human is conceived, they never "die" in the sense of ceasing to exist.

And Scriptures mentions three types of deaths:
a) Physical death. This is what most people mean when they speak of death. But even this does not mean cessation of existence, but merely separation from those living on earth. The "dead" person transitions into another world, and continues to live, forever. This death happens to everyone, including godly people.
b) Spiritual death. This is a state of being out of touch with God the Creator. People in this state of death cannot perceive or understand sipiritual things. To them, God and His claims are a work of fiction. They do everything to avoid being in the presence of God, either out of fear, hate, or shame, or all of the above. This was the death that Adam and his wife experienced, and that explains why they hid themselves in the garden when they heard God's voice as He visited them. Most people on earth are spiritually dead, though they are physically alive, just like Adam and his wife Eve were.
c) Eternal death. This is permanent separation from God, and occurs to all those who experience physical death while in a state of spiritual death.
No one alive is eternally dead. As long as we are alive, we can receive eternal life by turning from sin and accepting God's offer.

2. That Adam and Eve were not created in God's image, because, after they sinned, God said "Now the man has become like one of us".
Here's the full verse:

"And the Lord God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever:..." Gen 3:22 (KJV).

Only Mr. Aslan would interprete this passage to mean what he said it meant.


God: A Human History (Random House Large Print)
God: A Human History (Random House Large Print)
Author: Reza Aslan
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 0.5/5 Stars.
 2
Review Date: 10/3/2018


The author wrote about that which he has no knowledge. I only want to address 2 of Mr. Aslan's arguments.
1. That Adam and Eve did not die after eating the fruit of the tree, because, well, they did not die in the physical sense.
Death, as far as the Bible is concerned, never means cessation of living. Death always means "permanent separation", either from "the land of the living", or from God Himself, who is the source of life. Once a human is conceived, they never "die" in the sense of ceasing to exist.

And Scriptures mentions three types of deaths:
a) Physical death. This is what most people mean when they speak of death. But even this does not mean cessation of existence, but merely separation from those living on earth. The "dead" person transitions into another world, and continues to live, forever. This death happens to everyone, including godly people.
b) Spiritual death. This is a state of being out of touch with God the Creator. People in this state of death cannot perceive or understand sipiritual things. To them, God and His claims are a work of fiction. They do everything to avoid being in the presence of God, either out of fear, hate, or shame, or all of the above. This was the death that Adam and his wife experienced, and that explains why they hid themselves in the garden when they heard God's voice as He visited them. Most people on earth are spiritually dead, though they are physically alive, just like Adam and his wife Eve were.
c) Eternal death. This is permanent separation from God, and occurs to all those who experience physical death while in a state of spiritual death.
No one alive is eternally dead. As long as we are alive, we can receive eternal life by turning from sin and accepting God's offer.

2. That Adam and Eve were not created in God's image, because, after they sinned, God said "Now the man has become like one of us".
Here's the full verse:

"And the Lord God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever:..." Gen 3:22 (KJV).

Only Mr. Aslan would interprete this passage to mean what he said it meant.


The Heretic's Daughter
The Heretic's Daughter
Author: Kathleen Kent
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 156
Review Date: 3/31/2010
Helpful Score: 7


The Heretic's Daughter by Kathleen Kent is a stunner of a debut novel.
Kent is a descendant of Martha Carrier who was hung as a witch during the Salem Witch Trials.
She takes Martha's story and tells it through the eyes of Martha's daughter Sarah, who was forced to testify against her mother and confess to witchcraft at the age of eight. The book is an incredibly powerful historical novel with plenty of accuracy along with dynamic characters.

Sarah (who in the book is a bit older than the real child) lives a hard life working beside her taciturn parents and three older brothers on their hardscrabble farm. She is responsible for caring for her one-year old sister Hannah when the two are forced to live with her aunt and uncle during an outbreak of smallpox in the home. Her aunt and uncle are loving and friendly and Sarah's hard heart slowly blossoms under their care. This only hardens her heart even further toward her mother when she's returned to them several months later. But things are changing in their Andover, Massachusetts home. Witches have been discovered in Salem, and whispers and rumors are sweeping the countryside like wildfire. Kent carefully lays the case for Martha's charge of witchcraft: a jealous nephew, an angry neighbor, a humiliated serving girl. Each person becomes a strand in the noose around Martha's neck.

Kent does a masterful job of portraying the suspicion and dread as more and more neighbors are arrested, including Sarah's kind uncle, who isn't who she thought he was. She makes a promise to her mother that both imprisons and frees Sarah.
The descriptions of the horror of the jails the accused (including infants and small children) inhabited are unspeakable, and yet Sarah endures to learn what real love is. Of her mother's quiet, unfathomable, deep, unspoken love versus the shallow, easy, uncomplicated love of her aunt and uncle, Sarah learns which one stands in the face of adversity and so Sarah learns to stand and love as well.

The ending alludes to a secret story in Sarah's father's past, one I hope Kent tackles with her next book. This book will change the way history remembers the Salem Witch Trials when seen through the eyes of a child.


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