Julie L. (lamerehouse) - , - Reviews

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BETWEEN THE ACTS
BETWEEN THE ACTS
Author: Virginia Woolf
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
 1
Review Date: 6/20/2008
Helpful Score: 1


It is set in rural England within a single day in 1939. Worlds meet, but never unite. Miss La Trobe has organised a pageant, a dramatic version of 'Orlando'. During the performance the spectators are held together. Unity apprears to be triumphant. But not for long. When the play ends they fall apart again. And even between the acts the semblance of unity is lost...

'Miss La Trobe is Virginia Woolf's burlesque of herself as artist, and through her she states the truth about the artist and his unceasing endeavour to make his audience see'.


The Get Along Gang and the Christmas thief
Review Date: 6/16/2008


"They're gone! The Christmas presents are gone!" cries Dotty Dog. "Now Christmas will be ruined."

Who stole the presents from the Clubhouse Caboose?
Can the Get-Along-Gang find them in time for Christmas?

The Gang can do anything. So join them for some holiday hijinks and fun-filled adventure!


Howards End (Penguin English Library)
Howards End (Penguin English Library)
Author: E.M. Forster
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
 1
Review Date: 6/13/2008


Howard's End, published in 1910 to a chorus of praise, expresses, more perhaps than any other of his novels, themes close to Forster's heart.

In this story of two sisters and their very different paths in life Forster voiced many of his apprehensions about the future, and it has become more relevant than ever as a statement of humane, civilised values, while its subtle characterisation, its blend of irony and lyricism, its humour and its welath of unobtrusive symbols, make it one of the great English novels.


Mrs. Dalloway
Mrs. Dalloway
Author: Virginia Woolf
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
 1
Review Date: 6/13/2008


Clarissa Dalloway, a fashionable London hostess, is to give an important party. Through her thoughts on that day and through her memories of the past, her character is gradually revealed. And so are the other personalities who have touched on her life. Their loves and hates, their tragedies and comedies, all are vividly, intimately - and quite uniquely - brought to life.

Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf's fourth novel, marked an important stage in her development as a writer. With this book she finally broke from the form of the traditional English novel, establishing herself as a writer of genius.


A Room With A View
A Room With A View
Author: E. M. Forster
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
 2
Review Date: 6/20/2008


'You can transmute love, ignore it, muddle it, but you can never pull it out of you.'

In this brilliant piece of social comedy Forster is concerned with one of his favourite themes: the 'undeveloped heart' of the English middle classes, who are here represented by a group of tourists and expatriates in Florence. The English abroad are observed with a sharply ironic eye, but one of them, the young and unaffected Lucy Honeychurch, is also drawn with great sympathy.

In her relationships with her dismal cousin Charlotte, with the unconventional Emersons and - the scene transferred to England - with her supercilious fiance, Lucy is torn between lingering Victorian proprieties, social and sexual, and the spontaneous promptings of her heart ('an undeveloped heart, not a cold one'). Thus there are hidden depths of meaning in this sunniest and most readable of Forster's novels.

This edition includes Forster's light-hearted sequel, 'A View Without a Room'.


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