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Topic: Book about Genocide in Darfur

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Subject: Book about Genocide in Darfur
Date Posted: 7/15/2008 3:03 PM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
Posts: 4,974
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My synagogue is actively protesting the genocide in Darfur, so when I saw this thread I thought others here might be interested.

http://www.paperbackswap.com/forum/topic.php?t=124996

Date Posted: 7/15/2008 7:48 PM ET
Member Since: 9/16/2007
Posts: 997
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Thanks Sheryl, I hadn't heard of this one before.

Date Posted: 7/16/2008 7:53 AM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
Posts: 4,974
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I put it on my WL, although I might try getting it from the local library too.

ETA: Jeanne, it seems like we have a lot of similarities when it comes to our taste in books!



Last Edited on: 7/16/08 7:54 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 7/16/2008 3:59 PM ET
Member Since: 9/16/2007
Posts: 997
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Yep, I always look to your WL for ideas for my own!

Date Posted: 7/16/2008 5:07 PM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
Posts: 4,974
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Wow, what a compliment! Thanks!

Date Posted: 7/16/2008 6:20 PM ET
Member Since: 9/16/2007
Posts: 997
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Now if someone would just post all these great Jewish books we want!!  ;-)

Date Posted: 7/28/2008 12:35 PM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
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I stumbled across this while doing a search of my local library's catalog:

This voice in my heart : a genocide survivor's story of escape, faith, and forgiveness
    Tuhabonye, Gilbert

The horrors that took much of the world by surprise in the early 1990s in the countries of Burundi and Rwanda still shock and confound. Why did Hutus fight Tutsis? What aims were they pursuing? Why did no one step in and try to mediate? Will this happen again, since the two ethnic rivals still live side by side? The memories of Rwanda's 100-day massacre, which left 800,000 dead in 1994, and the end in 2000 of Burundi's 12-year civil war, in which 300,000 died, seem to be receding from our memories. These three new titles will remind us of the victims and of the prevailing conditions in these parts of Africa.One of these, Intimate Enemy, is primarily composed of duotone photographs of the Hutu murderers of the Tutsi in Rwanda, now serving prison sentences. Photographer Lyons (Another Africa, with Chinua Achebe) shows seemingly normal individuals, with little or no malice in their faces. This aspect of everyday ordinariness staggers the mind: these people include teachers, businessmen, a plumber, farmers, an accountant, etc., who committed horrific crimes. Most confessed to killing, and few will be allowed to leave prison. There are images of Tutsi survivors as well. The accompanying text by former Nairobi-based journalist Straus (political science, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison) is somber in tone, giving us a historical lesson few will forget. The interviews with these killers are straightforward and direct, lacking hyperbole and sensationalism. A very moving collection of photographs for African or international affairs collections in public and academic libraries.Tuhabonye was a minority Tutsi high school student in Burundi in 1993 when a particularly violent episode of the country's civil war exploded at his school. A runner of note, he was able literally to run away from the rampaging Hutus after witnessing the slaughter of over 100 of his Tutsi classmates and teachers. His story, coauthored with Brozek (coauthor with Andrea Giovino, Divorced from the Mob), is a case study in survival, a firsthand account of the horrors that he and thousands of other Tutsis endured. His rather idyllic narration of his life is interrupted by italicized portions of text relating his memories of the massacre, so painful that the reader may recoil when seeing further sections of italics approaching. A powerful and ultimately inspiring story by a man who became an NCAA champion runner, now a coach in Austin, TX, where he is training for the 2008 Olympics. Recommended for both high school and adult readers.Mushikiwabo, a native of Rwanda who emigrated to the United States in 1986, leaving her family behind, presents a chronological account of Rwanda's carnage from its onset on April 6, 1994, to its end 100 days later. With coauthor Kramer (Travels with the Celestial Dog), a veteran Washington, DC, reporter, she sets forth not only a memoir of her own family's experience of the genocide but also an exploration of her country's history and seeks to understand how peoples who had lived together in peace could quickly become butchers and butchered. If the reader is looking for answers to some of the questions posed by the Rwanda and Burundi genocides, more than a few will be found in this well-written account. Recommended for academic libraries and all African collections. James Thorsen, Madison Cty. Schs., Weaverville, NC Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. From: Reed Elsevier Inc. Copyright Reed Business Information