Book Reviews

851,815 Book Reviews submitted!

Looking for a great book to read? There's no better way to find books than to read other's book reviews that provide insight into the book's plot as well as the author's wtiting style. By doing a little bit of research you can find a book that you're sure to enjoy. As you're reading the reviews please login and rate the reviews as you go. This helps us sort the helpful more detailed reviews from the not-so-detailed reviews such as this one: "Good Book :)".

Review a Book! Perhaps you just finished a book that you loved! ...or hated. Help out others by writing your own review! Just search for the book you would like to review and look for the "Review this Book" button under the 5 star rating.

Reviews 1 to 25 of 1050
Show results per page.
Goto page:
Death on Blackheath (Charlotte & Thomas Pitt, Bk 29)
reviewed on + 791 more book reviews


I've read and enjoyed other Anne Perry books, but this is my first from her long-running Pitt series. Familiarity with earlier entries in the series probably would have enhanced my enjoyment of this one, but Perry is a skilled enough writer that I never felt completely lost, either. In fact, the writing throughout is competently done, especially the nicely crafted background of late Victorian England. The mystery was an intriguing one, a little different than the usual, and fairly convoluted. The only weakness for me was that events wrapped up too abruptly.

Sometimes it was a struggle to keep up with the large cast of characters, but the characters were also one of the strong points of the book. Charlotte and Pitt were likable and also amazingly believable; even minor characters like Stoker, Narraway, and Vespasia were memorable. Most of them were people who hinted at depths and complexities that I'd like to learn more about. I probably won't go back to read from the beginning, but I will look for other books in the Pitt series from time to time.

His Brother's Fiancee (Trueblood, Texas)
reviewed on + 32 more book reviews


I figured out pretty early that Michael was the one that was searching for Emily's birth parents and what he found was the reason he dumped her.

The Crime of Julian Wells
reviewed on + 194 more book reviews


Well, I finally read a book by this author that I did not like. I just couldn't connect with the story or characters and struggled to finish it.

The Nightingale Girls
reviewed on + 135 more book reviews


If you loved the PBS series Call the Midwife, these books are perfect for you. The story tells of three girls from vastly different backgrounds training for the honor of being a Nightingale. And make no mistake, back in the 1930's, it was more about who you were or who your parents knew, that got your foot in the door. While I've never thought of nursing as a easy or glamorous job, it was definitely even less so in the 30's. Nursing students were little more than servants at the beck and call of the head sisters. They lived in dorms together and under the iron fists of head sisters. (Just saw a parallel to the students in Hogwarts, hummm)
Nurses were not allowed to be married and had very little free time. Their escapades slipping in past curfew and dealing with roommates added a lighter level to these stories.
I read this on my Kindle which was so nice as I could stop and look up words that were unfamiliar to me both from the nursing and English standpoint. It was really fascinating and scary to see how much general medicine has changed in less than 100 years. Vaccinations and knowledge that we so take for granted was totally unknown or on the cutting edge in the 1930's.
At just over 500 pages, I flew through this book. I couldn't wait to see what happened in the next two books in this series that I had on my Kindle.

The Earl's Mistress
The Earl's Mistress
Author: Liz Carlyle
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Romance
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
reviewed on + 68 more book reviews


This is an interesting departure for Carlyle. I would categorize it as light erotica. LC is a sophisticated and talented author and, although I didn't expect the graphic nature, I enjoyed the book. The sizzle scenes were not gratuitous, but necessary to convey the plot she developed. Ms. Carlyle may lose some readers because of her decision to dip her toe into this genre, but she will gain other readers due to her mild exploration of erotica. Some of us who really enjoy her writing will continue to buy her books expecting to enjoy her fabulous writing skill in whatever form she choses.

Shiny Water (Dr. Michael Stone, Bk 1)
reviewed on + 163 more book reviews


I don't think it's fair to compare this author to Patricia Cornwell. Anna Salter PhD. has far more expertise and background in what she writes about than Cornwell has. Dr. Salter is a specialist in the study of rapists, pedophiles and various other criminals of this ilk. She has written non-fiction works that are in-depth studies of these types of criminals. This book is fiction, but has a lot of factual information included. The heart wrenching story of two young kids who are sexually abused, then brutally murdered, is hard to read, yet fascinating for those of us who can handle it. Dr. Michael Stone is driven to learn who the abuser is, and to find out if he is the same person who committed the murders. Once you get through the early pages, which are admittedly, a bit slow moving, the story picks up speed and has some hair raising moments. It's ending is satisfying and leaves nothing hanging. I stayed awake late reading it, which is more than I can say for a lot of novels that have great promise, but end up as duds. On the down side, the manuscript would have benefitted from much closer editing. I don't understand how so many grammatical errors were allowed to slip through. As for the plot development, I think the author will improve as she writes more fiction, and I'm sure she WILL. Also, eliminating her imaginary conversations with her mother, and her mother's background advice, would help a lot. It's not needed.
I look forward to reading her next one.

Poison Promise (Elemental Assassin, Bk 11)
reviewed on + 532 more book reviews


The 11th book about spider.
I'm not digging them any more like I used too, and the bad guy for the next book is even worse than this one.

The Hot Zone (A Rainshadow Novel)
The Hot Zone (A Rainshadow Novel)
Author: Jayne Castle
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Romance
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
reviewed on + 532 more book reviews


Standard fare of science fiction/romance.
This story continues about another planet with people with special abilities.
I like the dust bunnies the best.

Zomburbia (Zombie Apocalypse, Bk 1)
reviewed on + 135 more book reviews


Normally, I don't really like an angsty teen novel even if it does feature my fav horror character, zombies, but I really got a kick out of this book. While I realize that a lot of teens are characterized as moody, whiny, too stupid not to go down to the basement in their pjs to investigate THAT noise, the teens I raised and were around for what seemed like eons simply were not of that breed. Heck, I'd bet my group of country raised kids against any city raised group of kids come zombie apocalypse time anytime.
Anyway, back to this enormously entertaining book. Like I said earlier, usually the angsty teen has me beating my head against the wall in pain and hoping that they just bite the dust already. Not so with this book. Maybe it was the overall premise that the world has gone on in spite of the zombies. Yeah, everyone has a fence around their house and has a fully loaded shotgun in the gun rack of their truck or under the seat, but life goes on. The kids go to school, have part time jobs at the local hamburger shack, and dream about moving away from small town suburbia to New York City. Okay, okay, so NYC and most big cities are overrun by zombies. Small detail here. Like I said, country kids will make it hands down while the city kids are all turned into shufflers.
The main character, Courtney, has figured out a way to pay for college and while working at the Bully Burger supplements her income by selling Vitamin Z, a drug made from zombie brains, (okay something is just not right about that, I mean everybody know zombies eat brains) along with the burgers and fries. She has always been a bit of a loner so when a football jock starts hitting on her she starts hanging out with a new group of kids and some of her decisions leave a lot to be desired. While Courtney's not quite a kickass zombie killer, she's definitely no slouch either. I love Courtney's interaction with her Dad when he starts dating. Some of her conversations in her head are so funny that I found myself sniggering. Teens faced with their parents having sex are always worthy of a laugh or two.
I loved seeing the change in Courtney and and can't wait to see where Zombified takes us in January 2015.
One thing I really didn't like--the covers. The covers had me prepared more for zombie horror while the story was more about the changes and growth of Courtney. So maybe Courtney all tricked out in the Bully Burger security guards zombie fighting uniform would have been better.

Good Omens
Good Omens
Author: Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett
Genre: Science Fiction & Fantasy
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
reviewed on


If you like Pratchett or Gaiman, or British humor in general, or irreverent comedy, or fun, this is the book for you.

We All Married Idiots: Three Things You Will Never Change About Your Marriage And Ten Things You Can
reviewed on + 3 more book reviews


This is a great book to help anyone improve their marriage in ways that will make it stronger spiritually and every other way. There are humorous stories, and plenty to hold the reader's attention. Read it to find out why the title is so appropriate.

sinister
reviewed on + 48 more book reviews


Good read. Excellent story.

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America
reviewed on


I enjoyed this book. It wove two story lines together. One was the struggles with the Chicago Worlds Fair in the early 1890's. The other told of a nasty serial killer at the same time. The two stories intersected here and there --Very well done. I liked it so much I loaned it to my father and now am posting for another. I will be reading more by this author.

Life of Pi
Life of Pi
Author: Yann Martel
Genre: Literature & Fiction
Book Type: Paperback
reviewed on + 11 more book reviews


This was hard to get into but once I did I loved it. Great prose, I could see what the author was writing about.

The Kite Runner
The Kite Runner
Author: Khaled Hosseini
Genre: Literature & Fiction
Book Type: Paperback
reviewed on + 11 more book reviews


Loved it. Great details about life in the middle east.

The Five People You Meet in Heaven
reviewed on + 11 more book reviews


Excellent book. Left me feeling positive and refreshed.

Trapped (Harlequin Intrigue\The Men from Crow Hol)
reviewed on + 135 more book reviews


I've not read anything else by this author but would not hesitate to pick up the rest of the books in this series. I'm always a sucker for a second chance romance. I love the backstory that is fed to us in bits and pieces and the fact that the two main characters lived life and matured only to come full circle and question honestly why they didn't make a go of it the first time. As a twice married person myself, I so recognize the difference and intensity of first love as compared to a more mature love. I'm not saying that one is better than the other but you don't tend to take things for granted the second time around and you know that trust and compromise make for much smoother and romantic sailing.
I loved the suspense and South American jungle flavor of the setting. One of my top reasons for loving Harlequins was always the chance to travel to different locals and experience different cultures from the comfort of my couch. Trapped delivered this in spades. This story was fast paced and suspenseful, with just the right amount of romantic tension to make it a very enjoyable read. I read it in one sitting, late one night and then started another romance as I was too wound up to sleep. And everyone knows sleep is highly overrated when compared to a good book.

Parting Breath
reviewed on


I was delighted to discover Catherine Aird a few years ago, although she has been writing for a number of years. Her books are well-written and I love her take on the partnership of a detective inspector and his constable---the one who would be the inspector's last choice. Parting Breath is a good sample of her work. I haven't read one that I didn't like, though.

Never Again Good-bye (Second Chance, Bk 1)
reviewed on + 41 more book reviews


I thoroughly enjoyed this.

Where'd You Go, Bernadette
reviewed on + 85 more book reviews


I generally didn't like this book. Not for any major reasons other than I didn't think it was any good. I didn't like any of the characters but didn't feel like I got to know them at all. I had a hard time keeping track of which "document" I was reading or who was narrating. If you're looking for an engaging novel, skip this one.

Captain Corelli's Mandolin
Captain Corelli's Mandolin
Author: Louis de Bernieres
Genre: Romance
Book Type: Paperback
reviewed on + 576 more book reviews


Interesting book. Not quite the same as the movie, as if that were going to happen. Some parts of the movie I liked better than the book and some parts of the book I liked better than the movie.

And some parts of the book were vulgar for no reason I could understand.

The end of the book was more bittersweet than the movie and follows the characters into their 70s.

In the beginning it was a dull read and Captain Corelli didn't appear until almost the middle of the book. A good portion of the latter part of the book dealt with the horror of the Greek civil war, and the actions of the communists during WW II.

Still, I'm glad I read it.

Malice in Cornwall (Erskine Powell, Bk 2)
reviewed on + 17 more book reviews


My daughter and I BOTH enjoyed it. Nice pace, plenty of local color and detail, interesting plot. Can't wait to get #1 to read.

A Proper Pursuit
reviewed on + 122 more book reviews


This is a wonderful book. Set in 1893 during the World's Fair in Chicago, the reader gets a wonderful glimpse of life back then. The story revolves around a 20 yr. old girl names Violet & her grandmother & 3 aunts, all of whom are trying to match her up with a suitable mate. One aunt wants Violet to marry for money, one wants her to marry only for love, one wants her to stay single & join the Suffragettes & her grandmother wants her to marry a minister. While Violet has to sort through each of these possibilities, the one man she is drawn to she thinks is not a suitable match. Mixed in with it all is Violet's search for her mother her left her & her father when she was a child. It's a fascinating read & I won't spoil the ended for you. But there are also alot of lessons about what a good marriage is all about. I highly recommend this book.

Home to Holly Springs (Father Tim, Bk 1)
reviewed on


This book series follows the Mitford series so don't mix them up. All of them that I have read so far are very good

The Light Between Oceans
reviewed on + 74 more book reviews


An extremely difficult book for me to read. It was so sad, from beginning to end. I kept hoping for things to turn around, but it became more and more obvious there could not be a happy ending. And, there were no bad guys, just normal human beings making life decisions that led them further and further into despair. Having said all that, it was extremely well written. Must have been to have evoked all that emotion from me. So, when giving this a rating I was torn between the quality of writing and my personal taste in reading material. Hence the middle-of-the-road 3.

Reviews 1 to 25 of 1050
Show results per page.
Goto page: