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Confessions of Nat Turner
Confessions of Nat Turner
Author: William Styron
In 1831 Nat Turner awaits death in a Virginia jail cell. He is a slave, a preacher, and the leader of the only effective slave revolt in the history of 'that peculiar institution'. William Styron's ambitious and stunningly accomplished novel is Turner's confession, made to his jailers under the duress of his God. Encompasses the betrayals, cruel...  more »
ISBN-13: 9785553672539
ISBN-10: 5553672538
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Publisher: Books on Tape
Book Type: Audio Cassette
Other Versions: Paperback, Hardcover
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reviewed Confessions of Nat Turner on + 118 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
What an unsung classic! Despite its having won the Pulitzer in its day, this is not a title that folks recognize instantly. My book group chose it for a topical read during Black History month--February--and I thought it was amazing. That it was written by a white man, 150 years after the fact, was even more so. It is a balanced, indicting look at the conditions of slavery preceding the War Between the States and subtly but unmistakably points the finger right where it belongs.
reviewed Confessions of Nat Turner on + 376 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This was both more entertaining and more graphic than I was expecting it to be. I expected some kind of dry, fact-by-fact account of an event in the history of the U.S. Instead, this book brought Nat Turner to life for me. The author states in the foreword that he had very little to draw from when creating the novel; therefore, he took liberties.

I have no idea why this novel (fiction, mind you) is labeled "racist" by so many. I found myself caring for Nat and although not condoning his actions at the end of his journey, most certainly understanding them. I thought Styron dealt fairly with both, complex sides of Nat: a caring, religious-minded, genuinely good person and the man who had simply had enough of the blatant unfairness of his own life and the lives of fellow blacks. (I don't say slaves because there are examples of injustices to freed slaves appearing throughout the book). I almost screamed with rage at one point in the book because of the injustice Nat had to endure at the greedy hands of a so-called man of God.

Injustice and unfairness happen to everyone, some of us more harshly than others and on a larger scale. I think this is what makes this novel so appealing; every human being can relate to that. I think Styron's ultimate message to humanity was excellent, too, and a lesson for us all: don't condemn all of one race because of a few individuals.
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