Book Reviews of Crows over a Wheatfield

Crows over a Wheatfield
Crows over a Wheatfield
Author: Paula Sharp
ISBN-13: 9780786861170
ISBN-10: 0786861177
Publication Date: 8/1996
Pages: 403
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 3

4 stars, based on 3 ratings
Publisher: Hyperion Books
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

5 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Crows over a Wheatfield on + 43 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Good story!
reviewed Crows over a Wheatfield on + 28 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I read this book 5+ years ago and remember enjoying it, though I don't remember the particulars.
reviewed Crows over a Wheatfield on + 355 more book reviews
This novel encompasses thirty years in the life of Melanie Ratleer, the daughter of a famous criminal attorney, who was also capable of violent acts against his family. Melanie and her half-brother, Matthew, were terrorized by this man throughout their childhood. Matthew became psychotic and addicted to drugs while Melanie went on to law school and became a federal judge appointee.

As the story evolves, Melanie and Matthew become involved in a movement enabling women and children to escape abusive relationships when the legal system won't protect them. Legal ethics are frequently discussed in this novel, leaving the reader with many thought-provoking questions about justice and its administration.

There are many characters and sub-plots in this long book. Overall, I found the all-too-real issues disturbing and absorbing.
reviewed Crows over a Wheatfield on + 69 more book reviews
I enjoyed the writing of this author. The book isn't really fast-moving but it is an enjoyable read
reviewed Crows over a Wheatfield on
You can't help but get involved with all the characters in Crows over a Wheatfield from page one. There's lots of foreshadowing of sad things to come which kept me worried and up at night reading "just one more chapter". Quirky people abound but they're just normal enough to identiy with them and make you wonder if people like them might actually live somewhere you've been. A thread of the believable winds through the unbelievalbe.