Book Reviews of The Education of Little Tree

The Education of Little Tree
The Education of Little Tree
Author: Rennard Strickland (Adapter), Forrest Carter
ISBN-13: 9780826308795
ISBN-10: 0826308791
Publication Date: 5/1986
Pages: 216
Rating:
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 106

3.9 stars, based on 106 ratings
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

44 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Education of Little Tree on
Helpful Score: 6
I love this book. I loved reading it. I loved sharing it. Everyone I've recommended it to has loved it.
Then I heard things about the author I wished I didn't know. But then I thought, "but, those things don't show through in this book", so the story hasn't changed, only my background knowledge.
I still love the book.
It's not an autobiography, and not everything mentioned in the story is real. Okay. It's still great fun to read.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 204 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
This book was a huge hit when first published and later when re-issued. It was read by adults and children alike, and is well-loved. It is still relevant and a wonderful story of a young Cherokee boy.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on
Helpful Score: 3
Book of the Year-Abby Award Winner. A Cherokee boyhood of the 1980's remembered in generous, loving detail..an unbelievably rich young life. A felicitous remembrance of a unique education.--Kirkus Reviews.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 7 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
In the telling of the story of young Cherokee boy raised and educated in the backwoods by his grandparents, Forrest Carter talkes about living and dying, the place of people in the universe, the role of family and friends in the shaping of life, tragedy, humor, sorrow, bigotry, unselfishness and deep awareness of nature. Some of it is sad, some of it is hilarious, some of it is unbelievable and it is, all and all, charming.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 404 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
"The Education of Little Tree is (often)presented as the autobiography of the author, but it is a fictional story of a 5-year-old orphan boy named Little Tree who is raised by his full Cherokee Grandma and his half Cherokee Grandpa in their small mountain home during the depression." Amazon review
This is a beautiful story, but take the facts of it with a grain of salt.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 4 more book reviews
Excellent, thoughful and thought provoking. Ending somewhat anti climactic, but nevertheless an excellent read. Will be keeping my copy!
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 4 more book reviews
Most enjoyable! The title and cover give very little sign of the richness within.

Mr. Carter offers deep and enriching insights into the thought processes of people choosing to live a more simple life. Not condeming other ways of life, instead showing through his vivid and descriptions the full and pleasureable lives that many of our forefathers led.

I will definately look for more of his writings.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 643 more book reviews
I have read this book 5 times. It calls to me every year or so, and, wondering why, since it always leaves me in tears, I have decided that the simple, clear integrity of the lives of the characters in this book appeals to something deep inside of me. Raised a cultural christian, with all of the bible "training" and Sunday school attendance pins that go along with that background, I was always mildly troubled by the guilt and shame for just being human that orthodox Christianity attempted to cast over me. I realized, as an adult and after much study and soul searching, that we are a simple part of a complex universe, and, deserve to live in it fully, with all of the joys and sorrows encountered along the way, and, be able to question every single fascinating bauble that comes our way. I am also comfortable in the knowledge that my soul is part of something finite and larger than this life. I do not have to pay dues to a church or judgemental diety. Little tree was not raised to feel guilt or shame unless he did something to deserve it. Little Tree's simple life, religion and expectations, with a heritage of love, allowed him to live his life with crystal clear vision and peace. This book is written in a style that lets one's soul soar with expectation, if only for the short time that it takes to read it. God, please grant me the grace to raise my children like Little Tree.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 16 more book reviews
I loved this book until I found out that it was a work of fiction that misrepresented Cherokees under the guise of being an legitimate autobiography. If you want to read books by real Native Americans, don't read this. Instead you might read some Sherman Alexie or Leslie Marmon Silko. It is actually the work of a KKK member and segregationist Asa Carter who had previously written some of defiant segregationist Governor George Wallace's most famous speeches only to turn on him for being too accommodating to desegregation and running against him. Had he only written a work of fiction and labelled it as such it could stand or fall on its own merits. But Carter's appropriation of an "Indian" identity for his own purposes as an author is an act of cultural vandalism. See http://www.npr.org/2012/04/20/151037079/the-artful-reinvention-of-klansman-asa-earl-carter or http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2008/03/going_native.html for more information on his history and actions.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 7 more book reviews
WARNING!! This "classic, beloved" book is a work of TOTAL FICTION!
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 16 more book reviews
I loved this book until I found out that it was a work of fiction that misrepresented Cherokees under the guise of being an legitimate autobiography. If you want to read books by real Native Americans, don't read this. Instead you might read some Sherman Alexie or Leslie Marmon Silko. It is actually the work of a KKK member and segregationist Asa Carter who had previously written some of defiant segregationist Governor George Wallace's most famous speeches only to turn on him for being too accommodating to desegregation and running against him. Had he only written a work of fiction and labelled it as such it could stand or fall on its own merits. But Carter's appropriation of an "Indian" identity for his own purposes as an author is an act of cultural vandalism. See http://www.npr.org/2012/04/20/151037079/the-artful-reinvention-of-klansman-asa-earl-carter or http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2008/03/going_native.html for more information on his history and actions.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 18 more book reviews
This book is totally bogus. It should stop being reprinted.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 16 more book reviews
I loved this book until I found out that it was a work of fiction that misrepresented Cherokees under the guise of being an legitimate autobiography. If you want to read books by real Native Americans, don't read this. Instead you might read some Sherman Alexie or Leslie Marmon Silko. It is actually the work of a KKK member and segregationist Asa Carter who had previously written some of defiant segregationist Governor George Wallace's most famous speeches only to turn on him for being too accommodating to desegregation and running against him. Had he only written a work of fiction and labelled it as such it could stand or fall on its own merits. But Carter's appropriation of an "Indian" identity for his own purposes as an author is an act of cultural vandalism. See http://www.npr.org/2012/04/20/151037079/the-artful-reinvention-of-klansman-asa-earl-carter or http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2008/03/going_native.html for more information on his history and actions.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 16 more book reviews
I read this book in college. Although the details are sketchy, I know I cried and thought it was a fabulous read.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 3 more book reviews
The front cover claims "A true story by Forrest Carter" but scholars have shown Carter was not Indian. Still a cute enough tale, but not a true one.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 123 more book reviews
"A Cherokee boyhood of the 1930's remembered in generous, loving detail...an unbelievably rich young life. A felicitous remembrance of a unique education." ~ Kirkus Reviews
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 16 more book reviews
I loved this book until I found out that it was a work of fiction that misrepresented Cherokees under the guise of being an legitimate autobiography. If you want to read books by real Native Americans, don't read this. Instead you might read some Sherman Alexie or Leslie Marmon Silko. It is actually the work of a KKK member and segregationist Asa Carter who had previously written some of defiant segregationist Governor George Wallace's most famous speeches only to turn on him for being too accommodating to desegregation and running against him. Had he only written a work of fiction and labelled it as such it could stand or fall on its own merits. But Carter's appropriation of an "Indian" identity for his own purposes as an author is an act of cultural vandalism. See http://www.npr.org/2012/04/20/151037079/the-artful-reinvention-of-klansman-asa-earl-carter or http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2008/03/going_native.html for more information on his history and actions.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 26 more book reviews
A Cherokee boyhoodon the 1930's remembered in generous detail. A great story. Author also wrote The Outlaw Josey Wales.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 157 more book reviews
"Some of it is sad, some of it is hilarious, some of it is unbelievable, and all of it is charming."
The Atlantic
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 564 more book reviews
I really enjoyed this book! The Education of Little Tree is the story of a young orphaned 5-year old boy called Little Tree, who is taken in by his half-Cherokee Granpa and Cherokee Granma. The story takes place during the Great Depression in the mountains of Tennessee. Little Tree learns how to survive in the mountains and how to respect nature. He also learns the ways of the whites, especially the politicians and tax collectors who are trying to put Granpa out of his whiskey business. The book is full of wisdom and sometimes hilarious anecdotes relating how Granpa keeps his business afloat and scares off would be investors in his business. While Granpa teaches Little Tree the ways of nature and his trade (whiskey making), Granma teaches him how to read and the benefits of an education. Towards the end of the story, Little Tree is taken away from his grandparents and placed in an orphanage to get a better education, but ends up being beaten and abused by the system.

This was a very inspiring story and many consider this a classic along with Huckleberry Finn and To Kill a Mockingbird. When it was originally published, it was touted as a true memoir of the author. However, it was later shown to be mostly fiction and it was found out that the author was a former member of the KKK and a speechwriter for Alabama Governor George Wallace. See this Wikipedia article on the author.

Not sure how an ex-KKK member could write such a moving and inspiring story but overall, I would still highly recommend this!
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 344 more book reviews
No wonder this one is considered a classic - it is wonderful! Full of laughter and tears, a look into a way of life that is sadly long gone.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 58 more book reviews
This is a candidate for high honours in audio tapes: the story is appealing, the narrator is excellent and the novel has been cut with great thoughtful-ness. Little Tree, orphaned at the age of five, goes to live with his loving Native American grandparents who teach him the ways of the Cherokee. The chapters are self-contained stories, yet the characters are sustained from one chapter to the next. This is due to the comfortable reading done by Peter Coyote who makes the listener believe that the story is his own personal history. Sounding a bit like Henry Fonda, he makes us cry and laugh and care, with straightforward acting and no tricks. J.P. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 82 more book reviews
There is humor, tragedy, tenderness and, most of all, love...
Very good reading!
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 33 more book reviews
Another well written book by Forrest Carter
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 334 more book reviews
Sad, hilarious, and charming all in one. I found this book to be exceptionally perception of human emotion and choice.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on
Reading some of these reviews makes me realize how shallow people can be. They love it...then they trash it when they discover the truth about the writer. It shouldn't matter. Asa or Forrest was a jerk, not only in his politics but in his personal life. He was not a good person by today's standards...but since when do we judge books by researching the author's history. I agree it was misrepresented as an autobiography, but that doesn't change anything else about the book. And, for the individual who had the nerve to say he saw through the book before knowing about the controversy....well, I don't buy it. If you have any real understanding of the Cherokee culture and how it blended into what we see today you would be hesitant to judge how that culture looked in 1929 in the mountains of Appalachia. Some traditions were lost, some lingered and some morphed into something different. Remember, these folks were isolated in very small family groups with frequent brushes with the outside culture of the time. I know this because when I was a kid I heard many stories about my great great grandmother and the stories she told about how her parents had evaded the trail of tears when they were children. The term was never mentioned back then...I added it later when I read about it in high school. This book is wonderful. It is tough to believe Asa Carter could have written it. It could have be written by someone promoting the ugliness of racism. Maybe the guy was repenting, who knows.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 66 more book reviews
After finishing this book and then delving into several book reviews by Christopher Hitchins where Hitchins thoroughly examines the authors in addition to the authors' works, I decided to do a bit of research myself on some of the authors I had recently read. I started with Forrest Carter (aka Asa Earl Carter) from Anniston, Alabama - just up the road from my home in Birmingham. What happened next was eye-opening. This book, which I found full of stereotypes and quite average despite its great reviews, is actually steeped in controversy! I started with the 1991 New York Times' article "The Transformation of a Klansman" by Dan T. Carter. I was fascinated to hear that the New York Times moved The Education of Little Tree, originally published in 1976 and then reprinted in 1986, from its Nonfiction Bestseller List to its Fiction Bestseller List after this story broke. Although some of my fellow GoodReads members still have this book categorized as a memoir - be warned - this one is a hoax, a mocu-memoir written by a former segregationist who successfully re-invented himself late in life. I don't really feel all that duped since I was pretty unconvinced of the book's genuineness even before I researched its author, but I may have read the book differently if I'd known all this before I started. Lesson learned.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on
excellent
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 3 more book reviews
This is an absolutely wonderful story of an orphaned American-Indian boy who goes to live with his poor, mountain-dwelling Indian grandparents during depression-era America. I have shared this book with many and bought an extra copy for myself. It should be required reading for young people. I highly recommend it. It's unlike any story you'll read.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 100 more book reviews
moving/powerful
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 107 more book reviews
One of the most beautifully written stories ever: the remembrances of Little Tree as he learned the important things in life at the feet of his Cherokee Grandparents. Read it. This is a book you will never forget.
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A classic "must read." The story of a Cherokee boy's growing up in the 1930s.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 129 more book reviews
I did not like this book. It was hard to get into and just did not keep my interest. I love to read true memoirs and this one sounded interesting, but I was bored by it.
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An important bit of American history we don' hear much about. Well written and interesting.
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"I cannot recall a book that has moved me from laughter to tears and back again, with the frequency that this one has . . . If I could have but one book this year this would be my choice, for it is a deeply felt work which satisfies and fills." CHATTANOOGA TIMES
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 5 more book reviews
Fantastic book!
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This another of my all time favorite books from childhood. Forrest Carter writes of his early years being raised by his Cherokee grandparents (his grandfather was Josey Wales). Heartwarming and tender but also sad and disturbing, as the setting is early 20th century Southern USA, revealing the prejudice and oppression from that era. Get it for your collection.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on
Great for cross-cultural perspective.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 69 more book reviews
Originally described as a memoir. Later, it was revealed to be fiction. Even so, I laughed while crying, as I read it.
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on
A literary hoax. Carter was a white supremicist, not a Native American.
Not recommended
reviewed The Education of Little Tree on + 121 more book reviews
A True Story. A Cherokee boyhood of the 1930's.
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A classic - A Cherokee remembers his boyhood.
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This is a great storyof a mans cherokee boyhood. The book is not in perfect condition. The corners are tattered but all pages are intact and it is a wonderful book. Everyone in our family read and enjoyed it.
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This book is still sealed. It' was a Book of the Year Abby Award Winner. Native American theme. Smoke-free home.