Book Reviews of Ellie McDoodle: New Kid in School (Ellie Mcdoodle)

Ellie McDoodle: New Kid in School (Ellie Mcdoodle)
Ellie McDoodle New Kid in School - Ellie Mcdoodle
Author: Ruth McNally Barshaw
ISBN-13: 9781599902388
ISBN-10: 1599902389
Publication Date: 6/24/2008
Pages: 192
Edition: First Edition
Reading Level: Ages 9-12
Rating:
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
 2

3.5 stars, based on 2 ratings
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA Children's Books
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

2 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Ellie McDoodle: New Kid in School (Ellie Mcdoodle) on + 7145 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Reviewed by Marie Robinson for TeensReadToo.com

Ellie McDougal is the new kid in school. She had to leave her happy life behind when her family moved to a new town, and she is sure that her new home cannot possibly measure up. Little by little she begins to adjust, first by settling in at home with her new room, and then by spending time at the local library, where she finds books comforting and familiar.

She is especially nervous about fitting in at school. The other kids tease her, and no one can get her name right. But spunky Ellie does not stay down for long. Her classmates need an advocate to stand up to the principal, and it turns out that Ellie is just the kid for the job. In fact, she meets a number of challenges throughout this story and handles each one head-on, coming up with passionate yet reasoned solutions, and enacting positive change.

Author/illustrator Ruth McNally Barshaw has created something special with this character and with this format. Part novel, part journal, part comic book, Barshaw's unique style of sketch-journaling is a treat. The illustrations tell the story as much as the words, creating a lively, interactive narrative. You won't just read about Ellie's first day at school; you'll go to school with her and see everything through her eyes.

What's best about Ellie is her sense of humor. Occasionally she will pause in her narrative to share a joke, or to let us in on dinner at the McDougal house and all of the warm-hearted shenanigans her family participates in together.

Ellie may struggle with the common problem of starting over, but what sets her apart from other heroines is how she handles her problems. When she isn't happy with her new bedroom situation, she doesn't just complain to her parents or mope about it in her journal; instead she proposes a solution that will make every member of her family happy. Best of all, her parents allow her to take responsibility for herself, in ways that are loving and supportive, but also non-intrusive, so that Ellie can learn from her own experiences.

The book includes bonus features, such as an interview with Barshaw that she conducted in her signature sketch-journal style. There are even instructions on how to make a sketch-journal of your own, and there are tips on how to sketch, and how to draw comics.
reviewed Ellie McDoodle: New Kid in School (Ellie Mcdoodle) on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Marie Robinson for TeensReadToo.com

Ellie McDougal is the new kid in school. She had to leave her happy life behind when her family moved to a new town, and she is sure that her new home cannot possibly measure up. Little by little she begins to adjust, first by settling in at home with her new room, and then by spending time at the local library, where she finds books comforting and familiar.

She is especially nervous about fitting in at school. The other kids tease her, and no one can get her name right. But spunky Ellie does not stay down for long. Her classmates need an advocate to stand up to the principal, and it turns out that Ellie is just the kid for the job. In fact, she meets a number of challenges throughout this story and handles each one head-on, coming up with passionate yet reasoned solutions, and enacting positive change.

Author/illustrator Ruth McNally Barshaw has created something special with this character and with this format. Part novel, part journal, part comic book, Barshaw's unique style of sketch-journaling is a treat. The illustrations tell the story as much as the words, creating a lively, interactive narrative. You won't just read about Ellie's first day at school; you'll go to school with her and see everything through her eyes.

What's best about Ellie is her sense of humor. Occasionally she will pause in her narrative to share a joke, or to let us in on dinner at the McDougal house and all of the warm-hearted shenanigans her family participates in together.

Ellie may struggle with the common problem of starting over, but what sets her apart from other heroines is how she handles her problems. When she isn't happy with her new bedroom situation, she doesn't just complain to her parents or mope about it in her journal; instead she proposes a solution that will make every member of her family happy. Best of all, her parents allow her to take responsibility for herself, in ways that are loving and supportive, but also non-intrusive, so that Ellie can learn from her own experiences.

The book includes bonus features, such as an interview with Barshaw that she conducted in her signature sketch-journal style. There are even instructions on how to make a sketch-journal of your own, and there are tips on how to sketch, and how to draw comics.