Book Reviews of Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang

Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang
Foxfire Confessions of a Girl Gang
Author: Joyce Carol Oates
The Market's bargain prices are even better for Paperbackswap club members!
Retail Price: $16.00
Buy New (Paperback): $12.79 (save 20%) or
Become a PBS member and pay $8.89+1 PBS book credit (save 44%)
ISBN-13: 9780452272316
ISBN-10: 0452272319
Publication Date: 8/1/1994
Pages: 336
Rating:
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
 40

3.5 stars, based on 40 ratings
Publisher: Plume
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

8 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang on + 77 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 5
Angelina Jolie may have put this book's movie version on the map, but the novel itself is tenfold better, more subtle and engrossing. I had a lump in my throat while reading many of the scenes. One of my favorites.
reviewed Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang on + 101 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Story is about a girl gang that starts up in the late 50's/early 60's era. How they all came together, explores each girl's personality and all the adventures and "misadventures" they experience while growing up and finally growing apart.
reviewed Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang on
Helpful Score: 1
Great story well written ,About a girl gang all will strong personalities, very easy to get caught up in. Much better than the movie.
reviewed Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang on + 272 more book reviews
Great book. Joyce Carol Oates rambles, but it works here. A very compelling story of a girl gang in the 50s.
reviewed Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang on + 2 more book reviews
Ok ok ok, I admit it. I only read this book because of the movie with Angelina Jolie (before she was a super mega star, and cooler). Well, I was in for a surprise. I had to force my eyes from left the whole time, it seems. Some parts were intriguing but the writing is sometimes seamless and other times -usually without warning- jagged and confusing. Subjects jump around with no logical order and then chapters fly by full of violence and devious plots. I think the only reason I was able to choke this read down, was I knew -KNEW- that all this bad girl gang stuff: drugs, violence, etc would eventually lead to sex, right? Nope! Total let down.

First time EVER that a movie was better than the book.
reviewed Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang on + 37 more book reviews
This novel is a fictionalized account of an all-female gang that forms in a working class community in upstate New York. The gang, Foxfire, is founded by a group of girls who've all suffered alientation and lack of parental attention. The girls share a sense of being alienated and restricted from any sort of real social benefits or meaningful relationships becuase of their age, gender, economic status, and family situation. The gang is formed, and begins, by using public humilation and minor violence to bring justice to local men who have abused the privileges of their gender. Quickly, though, their activities escalate, and it becomes clear that the gang is on a path to self-destruction. This book was a bit hard to get into at first because its written in the tone and style of one of the gang's members, but the writing becomes engrossing. Oates truly takes on the tone and spirit of a teenage girl gang. While this is part of what makes the book hard to get into, it ultimately makes for an engrossing story. It is striking just how anti-male Foxfire's violence is, and the book seems to suggest that this is one of the myriad of social responses to a world in which girls are expendable objects, sexualized, and undervalued. Indeed, Oates invites the reader to consider the gang and it's activities as part of a continuum of responses that individuals in a depressed, sexist, and emotionally alienated society might produce. The book is as much a critique of the word that made Foxfire possible as it is a narration of the gang's activities. While Oates does not excuse the violence she clearly assigns broader culpability to the world in which these girls live.
reviewed Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang on + 25 more book reviews
This book is very intense. Love the movie, its a bit watered down though. Growing up in a time where women were just finding their voice, these young ladies choose to speak the only way they knew how. They became a force to be reckoned with. Operating outside of the law, these young adults refused to be the victims and instead choose to fight with fire, foxfire burns. Told through the eyes of Maddy the moral concious of the group, you feel a part of the action and often feel like screaming through the pages trying to warn the gang.
reviewed Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang on + 20 more book reviews
Oates' writing style here is unique yet refreshing. Enjoyable book. Too bad the movie was horrible.