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Girl In Translation
Girl In Translation
Author: Jean Kwok
Introducing a fresh, exciting Chinese-American voice, an inspiring debut about an immigrant girl forced to choose between two worlds and two futures. When Kimberly Chang and her mother emigrate from Hong Kong to Brooklyn squalor, she quickly begins a secret double life: exceptional schoolgirl during the day, Chinatown sweatshop worker in the eve...  more
ISBN-13: 9781594487569
ISBN-10: 1594487561
Publication Date: 5/4/2010
Pages: 304
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 55

4 stars, based on 55 ratings
Publisher: Riverhead Hardcover
Book Type: Hardcover
Other Versions: Paperback, Audio CD
Reviews: Member | Amazon | Write a Review
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Top Member Book Reviews

  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
reviewed Girl In Translation on + 268 more book reviews
2 member(s) found this review helpful.
Jean Kwok has written a captivating novel about an 11-year old girl, Kim, and her widowed mother who immigrate from China to the United States. They are sponsored by her Aunt Paula, whose demands upon the two define the meaning of "pound of flesh." Through Aunt Paula's "generosity," they live in an apartment in a soon-to-be-condemned building in Brooklyn, and Kim's mother works in a sweatshop owned by Aunt Paula and Uncle Bob for meager wages, out of which she repays Aunt Paula (with interest) the debts they owe to her. Kim's stellar academic performance eventually provides a way out of their poverty-stricken life.

I really liked the premise of this book. I found myself wondering how many Americans would have the courage and resolve to survive if transported to China under similar conditions. The conclusion is both affirming and heart-rending.
  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
reviewed Girl In Translation on + 465 more book reviews
2 member(s) found this review helpful.
I absolutely loved this book. Beautifully written debut effort. The immigrant story and Kimberly's journey resonated with me on so many levels. My father, too, worked in a factory as a child. We, too, lived in poverty in NYC in cold water flats barely scraping by. I, too, excelled in school and was offered a full scholarship to a prestigious preparatory school. But, unlike Kimberly, I didn't grab the opportunity. I admired Kimberly's persistance and dedication as she struggles to carve a new life for herself and her mother through her hard work and study. I cheered for her, cried for her and will never forget her story. I look forward to Ms. Kwok's next effort with anticipation. Very highly recommended!


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