Book Reviews of Hattie Big Sky

Hattie Big Sky
Hattie Big Sky
Author: Kirby Larson
ISBN-13: 9780385733137
ISBN-10: 0385733135
Publication Date: 9/26/2006
Pages: 304
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 15

4.1 stars, based on 15 ratings
Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

7 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Hattie Big Sky on + 2 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Good book but i was hoping for a bit of a happier ending.
reviewed Hattie Big Sky on + 60 more book reviews
This was a fun, informative book. The only problem that I found with it is that the (inexperienced) author used the same phrases way too many times. Every time I came across one of the trite little phrases, I vurped, and continued, swallowing my distaste, I found that the rest of the novel made up for the bilious reaction.
reviewed Hattie Big Sky on + 11 more book reviews
I must say, this is a good book. And I appreciate that it's completely clean. Still, Newbery Honor? I wouldn't have thought so. It's a nice story but not as well developed as I'd have liked. When you read the Little House books, you learn how to make butter, straw hats, or a well, right along with Laura. When you read about Hattie learning, all you learn is that she found out how to do it.
Also, I suspect that the author doesn't know how to cook. To read Hattie, you'd totally that it's easier to become a farmer than to learn how to cook. I doubt it.
The author's anti-war opinions are very evident throughout - it seems to be a major theme in the book. For a good (negative) review on that topic, see http://www.amazon.com/review/RIDFK8DG9QDV2/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm
Still, it's a fairly accurate, engaging historical fiction. An enjoyable read.
reviewed Hattie Big Sky on + 309 more book reviews
Good book, content suitable for young readers- my 11 yr. old enjoyed it. Written from a 17 yr. old's point of view trying to homestead in Montana during WWI, nice insights on the homefront during the war and the difficulties of country life.
reviewed Hattie Big Sky on + 298 more book reviews
great read will be looking for more. Passed this one on to mom.
reviewed Hattie Big Sky on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Grandma Bev for TeensReadToo.com

To me, the main criteria for a good book is a cast of great characters, and this book definitely has that. Hattie is a very mature 16-year-old. She is an orphan who has been raised by first one relative and then another, and now she finds that she has inherited a homestead from an uncle that she never really knew. Her best friend has just joined the army to go fight the Kaiser in Germany at the outbreak of World War I. Hattie boards a train with her cat, Mr. Whiskers, to claim her new home in Montana.

When she arrives, she discovers that she will be required to finish "proving up" on the homestead...build an enormous amount of fence, and plant eighty of the three-hundred-and-twenty acres in wheat and flax, and she only has eight months left to accomplish this. The house is a one-room cabin that is barely habitable, and winter has Montana in its grip. Her livestock consists of a very congenial horse, and a contentious cow.

Hattie is a very resourceful girl, but life is difficult. Most of her new neighbors become fast friends, but some desperately want to claim her land for their own. Her dear friends, the Mullers, suffer bad treatment because of their German heritage and the War.

This is a fast-paced story of adventure with friendship, heartbreak, and joy. The believable characters will remain with you long after you have read the book, and the handsome villain isn't all bad. The suspense in this very entertaining book builds to a surprising climax that I didn't anticipate. Larson adds a couple of interesting-looking recipes in the back of the book that I'm anxious to try out, along with a bibliography of other great reading about the American West and homesteading.
reviewed Hattie Big Sky on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Grandma Bev for TeensReadToo.com

To me, the main criteria for a good book is a cast of great characters, and this book definitely has that. Hattie is a very mature 16-year-old. She is an orphan who has been raised by first one relative and then another, and now she finds that she has inherited a homestead from an uncle that she never really knew. Her best friend has just joined the army to go fight the Kaiser in Germany at the outbreak of World War I. Hattie boards a train with her cat, Mr. Whiskers, to claim her new home in Montana.

When she arrives, she discovers that she will be required to finish "proving up" on the homestead...build an enormous amount of fence, and plant eighty of the three-hundred-and-twenty acres in wheat and flax, and she only has eight months left to accomplish this. The house is a one-room cabin that is barely habitable, and winter has Montana in its grip. Her livestock consists of a very congenial horse, and a contentious cow.

Hattie is a very resourceful girl, but life is difficult. Most of her new neighbors become fast friends, but some desperately want to claim her land for their own. Her dear friends, the Mullers, suffer bad treatment because of their German heritage and the War.

This is a fast-paced story of adventure with friendship, heartbreak, and joy. The believable characters will remain with you long after you have read the book, and the handsome villain isn't all bad. The suspense in this very entertaining book builds to a surprising climax that I didn't anticipate. Larson adds a couple of interesting-looking recipes in the back of the book that I'm anxious to try out, along with a bibliography of other great reading about the American West and homesteading.