Book Reviews of Larklight

Larklight
Larklight
Author: Philip Reeve
ISBN-13: 9781599900209
ISBN-10: 1599900203
Publication Date: 9/19/2006
Pages: 250
Reading Level: Ages 9-12
Rating:
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 7

4.2 stars, based on 7 ratings
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

6 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Larklight on + 26 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
An amazing Victorian era sci-fi adventure hearkening back to the likes of Jules Verne and HG Wells. Ships (like sailing ships) that travel between planets using wings and alchemical engines, automatons, aliens and a pirate with a heart of gold, what more could you want?
Although intended for Grades 6-10 I very much enjoyed it.
reviewed Larklight on + 2312 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I have previously read "Here Lies Arthur" by Philip Reeve and was impressed by both his writing and story creativity. I decided to check out some of his other books starting with this one. All I can say is "wow" this book was a joy to read.

I have always been fascinated by the HG Wells era of sci-fi. When spaceships were all brassy ships with huge sails; when space was pictured as an ocean. Imagine if Great Briton had succeeded at space travel in the 1800's. Well that is the setting this book takes place in.

Art and his sister, Myrtle, live in the house of Larklight. A house that floats out around earth. When their house is attacked by giant spiders they are forced to use the escape pod and they end up on the Moon. Here they encounter more dangerous creatures and end up being rescued by Jack, a famous space-pirate who is much younger than anyone thought.

The story moves fast, is wonderfully creative without feeling forced or contrived, and really captures your imagination. Jack was my favorite character with his jaded past and determination. But all of the characters are well-developed and interesting. The book is written as a memoir with crazy footnotes and little drawings inside. It is mostly from Art's point of view, but there are sides to Myrtle's diary. It is done in a very light and tongue-in-cheek style; with much of the overdone and grandiose thinking of that era.

I have a small complaint about this book and that's that I think all the girls were sold a bit short; I suppose it is a reflection of the era. For the most part they are all simpering and needy; although Myrtle comes into her own by the end. This is definitely more of a boy's book; but I still enjoyed it thoroughly.

This book is going on my shelf as a keeper and I am excited to read the next two book in the series (Starcross and Mothstorm).
reviewed Larklight on + 306 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I absolutely loved this book. Reeve has a wonderful way of spinning a thrilling tale. I enjoyed the whole book. Each and every character stood out, lots of wry humor, plenty of action and a great story to boot.
This about a boy named Art and his sister Myrtle. They live in a "house" that sails in outer space with their dad. The house is soon attacked by giant white spiders. Art and Myrtle are able to flee. They make it to the moon only to be captured. There they are rescued by Jack Havoc, a very famous pirate. From there the fun and action keep going.
I look forward to the other 2 books in this series as well as more of Reeve's books.
reviewed Larklight on
My daughter, 9, has read and re-read this book. She absolutely adores the whole Larklight Trilogy. I highly recommend it, particularly for young advanced readers. It is at an 8th to 9th grade readling level, but the content is appropriate for younger readers.
reviewed Larklight on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Lynn Crow for TeensReadToo.com

When eleven-year-old Art Mumby finds out that a visitor is arriving at his run-down home, Larklight, which floats in space beyond the moon, he hardly expects to be thrust into a frightening adventure of pirates, plates, and a millenium-long conflict upon which the fate of the solar system rests. He tells the story of this adventure in LARKLIGHT (occasionally giving his older sister, Myrtle, a chance to narrate via her diary), and the story is nothing if not fantastic.

Philip Reeve (author of the HUNGRY CITY CHRONICLES) has created another fascinating world in LARKLIGHT. Art lives in the Victorian society of the 1800's--or rather, what Victorian society would have looked like if they'd developed space travel, and astronomy worked according to early speculations about aether (an air-like substance in space that people can move and breathe in), and interplanetary beings (Venus, Mars, and the moons of Jupiter are all home to a variety of life forms). Reeve cuts no corners, painting the cities and citizens of the solar system in dazzling detail. The setting is a gorgeous mix of fantasy and science fiction, and fans of both genres will find much to enjoy.

If the world wasn't exciting enough on its own, the adventure is of the edge-of-your-seat variety. Art and Myrtle tumble from one tense situation to another with alarming frequency. Most chapters end on cliffhangers, so be prepared to have trouble finding a place to pause. Reeve throws in enough twists and turns to keep readers guessing right until the end, and both Art and Myrtle get the chance to play hero.

Art, as the main character, is not yet a teen himself, so teens may find his narration a little immature for their liking. If they're willing to give him a chance, though, they will discover that LARKLIGHT is a fast-paced, imaginative journey well worth taking.
reviewed Larklight on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Lynn Crow for TeensReadToo.com

When eleven-year-old Art Mumby finds out that a visitor is arriving at his run-down home, Larklight, which floats in space beyond the moon, he hardly expects to be thrust into a frightening adventure of pirates, plates, and a millenium-long conflict upon which the fate of the solar system rests. He tells the story of this adventure in LARKLIGHT (occasionally giving his older sister, Myrtle, a chance to narrate via her diary), and the story is nothing if not fantastic.

Philip Reeve (author of the HUNGRY CITY CHRONICLES) has created another fascinating world in LARKLIGHT. Art lives in the Victorian society of the 1800's--or rather, what Victorian society would have looked like if they'd developed space travel, and astronomy worked according to early speculations about aether (an air-like substance in space that people can move and breathe in), and interplanetary beings (Venus, Mars, and the moons of Jupiter are all home to a variety of life forms). Reeve cuts no corners, painting the cities and citizens of the solar system in dazzling detail. The setting is a gorgeous mix of fantasy and science fiction, and fans of both genres will find much to enjoy.

If the world wasn't exciting enough on its own, the adventure is of the edge-of-your-seat variety. Art and Myrtle tumble from one tense situation to another with alarming frequency. Most chapters end on cliffhangers, so be prepared to have trouble finding a place to pause. Reeve throws in enough twists and turns to keep readers guessing right until the end, and both Art and Myrtle get the chance to play hero.

Art, as the main character, is not yet a teen himself, so teens may find his narration a little immature for their liking. If they're willing to give him a chance, though, they will discover that LARKLIGHT is a fast-paced, imaginative journey well worth taking.