Book Reviews of Letters from Rapunzel

Letters from Rapunzel
Letters from Rapunzel
Author: Sara Lewis Holmes
ISBN-13: 9780060780739
ISBN-10: 0060780738
Publication Date: 3/1/2007
Pages: 192
Edition: Ages 8-12 OR Grades
Reading Level: Ages 9-12
Rating:
  • Currently 4.8/5 Stars.
 3

4.8 stars, based on 3 ratings
Publisher: HarperCollins
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

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Reviewed by Sally Kruger, aka "Readingjunky" for TeensReadToo.com

Cadence Brogan aka Rapunzel may have found someone to help her with her problems. That someone is P.O. Box #5667.

Cadence's father has battled clinical depression most of his life. His recent bout has required treatment in the hospital to regulate his medication. Shortly after her father's hospitalization, Cadence discovers a torn piece from a letter her father had written to someone with the address P.O. Box #5667. Not knowing this person, but hoping whoever it is can help shed more light on her father's condition; Cadence begins writing her own letters.

The problems Cadence hopes to get help with include her father's rapid recovery and return home, a busy, hard-working mother, an annoying classmate named Andrew, and mandatory attendance in the GT (Gifted and Talented) program.

A great lover of fairy tales, Cadence focuses on the similarities between herself and the imprisoned Rapunzel. Many of her letters describe her hope to escape and her search to find a cure for the Evil Spell holding her father "prisoner." As she searches for answers, some of what she discovers is not pleasant. In an effort to protect her, Cadence learns that her mother, who refers to her husband's condition as C.D., has not been completely honest about the extent of the depression. Not being able to share her thoughts with her father, more and more of Cadence's feelings pour out in her letters to #5667.

Sara Lewis Holmes cleverly creates Cadence's story through these letters. She has Cadence holding out hope that her letters will be answered, but even as that hope fades, Holmes portrays a positive, up-beat Cadence. Any reader will identify with the struggle to overcome adversity, but this book is sure to hit home with readers who have experience with friends or family members suffering from clinical depression.