Book Reviews of Lost in My Own Backyard : A Walk in Yellowstone National Park (Crown Journeys)

Lost in My Own Backyard : A Walk in Yellowstone National Park (Crown Journeys)
Lost in My Own Backyard A Walk in Yellowstone National Park - Crown Journeys
Author: Tim Cahill
ISBN-13: 9781400046225
ISBN-10: 140004622X
Publication Date: 6/8/2004
Pages: 144
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 15

3.8 stars, based on 15 ratings
Publisher: Crown
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Lost in My Own Backyard : A Walk in Yellowstone National Park (Crown Journeys) on + 297 more book reviews
Travel around Yellowstone (the world's first national park) with famous travel writer and editor Tim Cahill, who lives within 50 miles of the park ("but proximity does not guarantee competence. I've spent entire afternoons not knowing exactly where I was, which is to say, I was lost in my own backyard...")
reviewed Lost in My Own Backyard : A Walk in Yellowstone National Park (Crown Journeys) on + 76 more book reviews
We just returned from a vacation to Yellowstone. Makes me want to go back and see some of the trails that we missed. Definitely want to add a backcountry trail to our next visit.
reviewed Lost in My Own Backyard : A Walk in Yellowstone National Park (Crown Journeys) on
This book wasn't quite what I expected. I guess I expected the book to be stories about the author's experiences in Yellowstone. There were some stories of his experiences, but it was in the last 40 pages mainly which disappointed me. I was hoping for more. I didn't care for his use of crude language.

The beginning of the book seemed like a history-type lesson. Further into the book, he started talking more about different sections of the park. The one thing I did like was how he discussed back country trails. That seemed really neat to me as I have never done that in Yellowstone even though I've been in the park several times. His discussion of unknown waterfalls was interesting, but he definitely has a biased view toward naming the waterfalls & keeping them unknown to be discovered by others.