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Topic: Mannerpunk and other challenge queries

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Subject: Mannerpunk and other challenge queries
Date Posted: 1/25/2010 10:06 PM ET
Member Since: 9/20/2008
Posts: 402
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Greetings All! I need to enlist the help of all the veteran fantasy readers on the board. I really need help with Mannerpunk titles. I have no idea where to even begin. This is a copy of my list. Please feel free to make any suggestions. Mostly I have wanted to read Feist and Lackey but I am completely open to any suggestions.

1. High Fantasy: Arrow's Flight by Mercedes Lackey 12-22-2009

2. Comic Fantasy:One for Morning Glory by John Barnes

3. Dark Fantasy: Coraline by Neil Gaiman

4. Fairytale Fantasy: The Princess Bride by William Goldman

5. Urban Fantasy:

6. Sword and Sorcery: Magician Master by Raymond Feist

7. Heroic Fantasy: Debt of Bones by Terry Goodkind

8. Romantic Fantasy Stardust by Neil Gaiman

9. Science Fantasy

10. Fantasy of Manners (aka Mannerpunk)

11. Magic Realism

12. Young Adult Fantasy: Eragon by Christopher Paolini

13. Time Travel Fantasy: Gunpowder Empire by Harry Turtledove 12-15-2009

14. Supernatural Noir

15. Paranormal Interview with a Vampire by Anne Rice

Setting/Protagonist Categories

1. Protagonist older than 35 Exile's Valor by Mercedes Lackey

2. Protagonist younger than 18 To Take a Thief by Mercedes Lackey

3. Magical human protagonist Magician: Apprentice by Raymond Feist

4. Non-human protagonist: Redwall by Brian Jaques

5. Set in a royal court: Arrow's Fall by Mercedes Lackey

6. Set in a school of magic: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling

7. Set in a recognizable historical milieu The Once and Future King by T.H. White

8. Set in a recognizably non-European milieu

9. Set in a radically altered historical milieu (e.g. steampunk, alternate history) Throne of Jade by Naomi Novik

10. Action takes place while traveling (quest structure)

11. Action takes place while traveling (non-quest structure)

12. Set in a world containing no magic: Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

13. Told from a first-person perspective: Thraxas at War by Martin Scott

14. Told from a third-person omniscient perspective

15. Told from a third-person limited, multi-perspective viewpoint

Author/Award Categories (Note: Lists of all the Award winners can be found on Wikipedia.)

1. Non-Caucasian Author

2. Author from a country other than the U.S.A., the United Kingdom, Canada, or Australia

3. Work written pre-1950 The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkein

4. Work written pre-1920

5. Work written the year you were born Magician:Master by Raymond Feist

6. Work originally written in a language other than English

7. Work written by a Gandalf Grand Master/World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement: Ill Met in Lankhmar by Fritz Leiber

8. Work by an author you have never read before: A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

9. Anthology

10. Hugo Award Winner: American Gods by Neil Gaiman

11. Nebula Award Winner: Paladin of Souls by Lois McMaster Bujold

12. Locus Fantasy Award Winner: The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmerman Bradley

13. Mythpoeic Award Winner: The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold

14. World Fantasy Award Winner: Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clark

15. James Tiptree, Jr. Award Winner: Orphan Tales:Nights in the Garden by Catherine Valente



Last Edited on: 1/25/10 10:10 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 1/26/2010 12:22 AM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
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Well, the quintessential mannerpunk novel is Swordspoint by Ellen Kushner, which I know I've been plugging and which Britney (aka Donatella) just read for the challenge and loved. . .

For science fantasy there's M. John Harrison's Viriconium, which is actually four novellas set in a dying Earth "littered with the detritus of the milennia" (thank you Wikipedia, for a very nice quote) and which is really wonderfully written. . .

And (still for science fantasy) since I notice you have a Marion Zimmer Bradley novel already on your list, if you like her writing style you can give one of her Darkover novels a try. . . they have been favorites of mine for years. They're all designed to stand alone (and don't, please, just start with internal series chronology and read Darkover Landfall, because it's one of the weakest in the bunch) but I think one of the best places to start is with The Spell Sword/The Forbidden Tower pairing (The Spell Sword is really short, and could also fit third-person limited, multi-perspective viewpoint, so you would fill two spots). Another good place is The Heritage of Hastur.

For urban fantasy the author almost everyone I know would recommend you start with is Charles de Lint, but I would add that his short stories are stronger than his novels so you should pick up a collection of one of those: I dearly loved Dreams Underfoot, which is all stories set in Newford, his major creation. . .

The best fantasy anthology I've read (though I'll admit I haven't read many) is Wizards: Magical Tales from the Masters of Modern Fantasy, ed. by Gardner Dozois and Jack Dann. It has a veritable all-star line-up of authors, and they actually turn in good work. :)

And I will incidentally endorse your selection of One for the Morning Glory as comic fantasy; it didn't quite hold together at the very end, but it is an enjoyable ride. If for some reason you decide not to go with that, I would also endorse Kage Baker's The Anvil of the World, which was my selection for the category, and is zanily delightful.

That's all I've got for now. . . good luck!

Date Posted: 1/26/2010 10:46 AM ET
Member Since: 9/3/2008
Posts: 455
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Charles de Lint has older novels that don't take place in Newford that are pretty good.  One is Moonheart.  That would be an Urban Fantasy.  or maybe Mojo and the Pickle Jar (douglas Bell)  It's odd but is urban fantasy of a sort.  It might count as supernatural noir but it's not dark just supernatural.     I just read Carnivores of Light and Darkness by Alan Dean Foster it would work for Travel Quest -it's easy reading.  What do people think about FIght Club (Palahnuik) being fantasy?  It might just be disturbed...  The Legends anthologies are good as are most edited by Ellen Datlow & Terri Winding.  Lackey has edited a lot of vlademar anthologies if you want to keep with her.  Peter Beagle has some good anthologies and some traveling quest/no quest books.  Titus Groan by Mervyn Peake is my choice for mannerpunk.  I haven't read it yet but I've heard it's good.  Lots of books are written from a 3rd person limited viewpoint so anything you pick up would probably work.  One of the older magic realism books is Like Water for Chocolate.    So there's a random group of titles for you!

Date Posted: 1/27/2010 5:31 PM ET
Member Since: 10/31/2009
Posts: 84
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I'd recommend:

Urban Fantasy: Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman, War for the Oaks by Emma Bull, Perdido Street Station by China Mieville, or Storm Front by Jim Butcher

Science Fantasy: The Shadow of the Torturer by Gene Wolfe

Fantasy of Manners (aka Mannerpunk): The Phoenix Guards by Steven Brust or War for the Oaks by Emma Bull

Magic Realism: The Land of Laughs by Jonathan Carroll

Young Adult Fantasy: Eragon by Christopher Paolini The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman

Supernatural Noir: Already Dead by Charlie Huston

Set in a recognizably non-European milieu: Bridge of Birds by Barry Hughart or Across the Nightingale Floor by Lian Hearn

Action takes place while traveling (quest structure): The Book of Knights by Yves Meynard

Action takes place while traveling (non-quest structure): Shadowbridge by Gregory Frost

Told from a third-person omniscient perspective: The Sad Tale of the Brothers Grossbart by Jesse Bullington

Told from a third-person limited, multi-perspective viewpoint: A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin or The Lions of al-Rassan by Guy Gavriel Kay

Non-Caucasian Author: Imaro by Charles R. Saunders, Acacia by David Anthony Durham, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin, The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate by Ted Chiang, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami, or Wizard of the Crow by Ngugi wa Thiong'o

Author from a country other than the U.S.A., the United Kingdom, Canada, or Australia: The Other City by Michal Ajvaz, Blood of Elves by Andrzej Sapkowski, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami, or Wizard of the Crow by Ngugi wa Thiong'o

Work written pre-1920: A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Buam, The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald

Work originally written in a language other than English: The Other City by Michal Ajvaz, Blood of Elves by Andrzej Sapkowski, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami, or Wizard of the Crow by Ngugi wa Thiong'o

Anthology: Steampunk ed. by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer, Legends ed. by Robert Silverberg, Thieves' World ed. by Robert Asprin



Last Edited on: 1/27/10 6:26 PM ET - Total times edited: 3