Book Reviews of The Moonstone

The Moonstone
The Moonstone
Author: Wilkie Collins
ISBN-13: 9781593083229
ISBN-10: 159308322X
Publication Date: 8/1/2005
Pages: 510
Edition: Unabridged
Rating:
  • Currently 4.4/5 Stars.
 6

4.4 stars, based on 6 ratings
Publisher: Barnes & Noble Books
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

24 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Moonstone on + 34 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
I don't re-read many books, but over the years I keep going back to this one ... and it's a good sized book!
The lovely Moonstone has a curse on it, that dooms each owner. It's passed from hand to hand for different reasons ... sometimes as revenge with a hope the curse will "get" the next owner! There are turbaned Indians creeping around corners, in through the windows, who knows where next, trying to recover their sacred stone. Meanwhile, people who are at first thrilled to own this beautiful gem suddenly find themselves in the midst of a nightmare. The mystery rolls along pulling you in ... just my kind of a great read. Enjoy!
reviewed The Moonstone on + 6 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
I read this for a book group who's objective was to read mysteries. This was their first choice, as it is heralded as the first 'who done it' written. It is filled with unique characters who you very much get to know.
Several members of the group were put off by the Victorian language and style, sometime with explanations that go on a unnecessary length and are a bit flowery. I however was a fan. Collins was a contemporary of Charles Dickens and there a similarities in the writing style.
A very engaging story, with twists and turns of plot. Characters who are distinct and interesting.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 902 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
On the surface, this classic mystery novel about a missing gemstone doesn't seem all that interesting. But don't let those assumptions fool you. T.S. Eliot knew what he was talking about when he called The Moonstone, "The first, the longest, and the best of modern English detective novels."

It would seem impossible to make a Sherlock Holmes type of mystery last for upwards of 500 pages without the story becoming tedious and without the readers crying for it to hurry up and end already, but somehow The Moonstone pulls this off brilliantly.

The entire book is a fluid exchange of events and clues that are never stagnant and serve to keep the reader engaged, entertained, and (in my case at least) totally surprised once everything manages to unfold. There is so much in this book that I did not see coming, and I devoured the ending with surprise and wonder as I was let in on the last big secret and was finally allowed to say, "So THAT'S who did it!"

In a historical context, it was interesting to see the parallel drawn between The Moonstone (published 1868) and the protracted case of the Road Hill Murders in 1860 that launched an all-consuming 'detective fever' within the collective English consciousness. The novel's plot is obviously inspired by real life events, and the novel's Sargeant Cuff is an fitting homage to the real life Scotland Yard detective, Jonathan Whicher, who was in charge of the Road Hill investigation.

This is an incredibly entertaining and satisfying adventure. It is very well written, well thought out, and will truly leave you guessing until the very end. This book is truly a classic and it is more than deserving of such a distinction.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 30 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Considered to be one of the first mystery novels, The Moonstone is a story about war, theft, murder, suicide, love and even drug use. Incredibly compelling, the story is told by several narrators, through letters, journal entries, and first person accounts. The mystery unfolds both to the main characters and the reader simultaneously. Very well written, its a story that will keep you involved from beginning to end.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 902 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
On the surface, this classic mystery novel about a missing gemstone doesn't seem all that interesting. But don't let those assumptions fool you. T.S. Eliot knew what he was talking about when he called The Moonstone, "The first, the longest, and the best of modern English detective novels."

It would seem impossible to make a Sherlock Holmes type of mystery last for upwards of 500 pages without the story becoming tedious and without the readers crying for it to hurry up and end already, but somehow The Moonstone pulls this off brilliantly.

The entire book is a fluid exchange of events and clues that are never stagnant and serve to keep the reader engaged, entertained, and (in my case at least) totally surprised once everything manages to unfold. There is so much in this book that I did not see coming, and I devoured the ending with surprise and wonder as I was let in on the last big secret and was finally allowed to say, "So THAT'S who did it!"

In a historical context, it was interesting to see the parallel drawn between The Moonstone (published 1868) and the protracted case of the Road Hill Murders in 1860 that launched an all-consuming 'detective fever' within the collective English consciousness. The novel's plot is obviously inspired by real life events, and the novel's Sargeant Cuff is an fitting homage to the real life Scotland Yard detective, Jonathan Whicher, who was in charge of the Road Hill investigation.

This is an incredibly entertaining and satisfying adventure. It is very well written, well thought out, and will truly leave you guessing until the very end. This book is truly a classic and it is more than deserving of such a distinction.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 242 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
TS Eliot and Henry James praised Collins for his creative writing of the mystery story. His characterizations are colorful and have become prototypes for many modern detective novels. He also introduced social and psychological factors and this book is considered by many to be one of the greatest detective stories. But don't let that put you off! This is a great yarn set in Victorian times, like Holmes books on stolen gems and Hindu treasures. The plot is fast moving and full of twists and turns and will keep you guessing. Really liked it: style is modern and easy to read.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 902 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
On the surface, this classic mystery novel about a missing gemstone doesn't seem all that interesting. But don't let those assumptions fool you. T.S. Eliot knew what he was talking about when he called The Moonstone, "The first, the longest, and the best of modern English detective novels."

It would seem impossible to make a Sherlock Holmes type of mystery last for upwards of 500 pages without the story becoming tedious and without the readers crying for it to hurry up and end already, but somehow The Moonstone pulls this off brilliantly.

The entire book is a fluid exchange of events and clues that are never stagnant and serve to keep the reader engaged, entertained, and (in my case at least) totally surprised once everything manages to unfold. There is so much in this book that I did not see coming, and I devoured the ending with surprise and wonder as I was let in on the last big secret and was finally allowed to say, "So THAT'S who did it!"

In a historical context, it was interesting to see the parallel drawn between The Moonstone (published 1868) and the protracted case of the Road Hill Murders in 1860 that launched an all-consuming 'detective fever' within the collective English consciousness. The novel's plot is obviously inspired by real life events, and the novel's Sargeant Cuff is an fitting homage to the real life Scotland Yard detective, Jonathan Whicher, who was in charge of the Road Hill investigation.

This is an incredibly entertaining and satisfying adventure. It is very well written, well thought out, and will truly leave you guessing until the very end. This book is truly a classic and it is more than deserving of such a distinction.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 185 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Excellent British mystery which appears to be one of the founding novels in the genre (predated Conan Doyle even! though it was published just after Poe's stories. . .) and transcends the genre in its portrayal of character and class. The mystical Indian element didn't do much for me, and the Gothic elements weren't my thing, but Betteredge the Butler, Miss Clack the poor relation, and Sergeant Cuff (who isn't actually the all-knowing detective that became such a staple of the genre after Holmes) are all beautifully drawn. I guessed the villain relatively early, but was still surprised by a couple twists in the middle. A good solid read, one that I would have given five stars to except that it is absolutely brilliant through the first 150 pages and kind of peters out through the end.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 902 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
On the surface, this classic mystery novel about a missing gemstone doesn't seem all that interesting. But don't let those assumptions fool you. T.S. Eliot knew what he was talking about when he called The Moonstone, "The first, the longest, and the best of modern English detective novels."

It would seem impossible to make a Sherlock Holmes type of mystery last for upwards of 500 pages without the story becoming tedious and without the readers crying for it to hurry up and end already, but somehow The Moonstone pulls this off brilliantly.

The entire book is a fluid exchange of events and clues that are never stagnant and serve to keep the reader engaged, entertained, and (in my case at least) totally surprised once everything manages to unfold. There is so much in this book that I did not see coming, and I devoured the ending with surprise and wonder as I was let in on the last big secret and was finally allowed to say, "So THAT'S who did it!"

In a historical context, it was interesting to see the parallel drawn between The Moonstone (published 1868) and the protracted case of the Road Hill Murders in 1860 that launched an all-consuming 'detective fever' within the collective English consciousness. The novel's plot is obviously inspired by real life events, and the novel's Sargeant Cuff is an fitting homage to the real life Scotland Yard detective, Jonathan Whicher, who was in charge of the Road Hill investigation.

This is an incredibly entertaining and satisfying adventure. It is very well written, well thought out, and will truly leave you guessing until the very end. This book is truly a classic and it is more than deserving of such a distinction.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 5 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Maybe the first detective fiction in the English language, 'The Moonstone' tells the story of a huge Indian diamond which is stolen several times. It was first published it 1868. This edition includes footnotes, and an essay on Collins' life (he was friends with Dickens). Collins uses an unusual narrative device which I won't divulge here. I enjoyed the book because of its history as well as because I love "who dunnits"!
reviewed The Moonstone on + 902 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
On the surface, this classic mystery novel about a missing gemstone doesn't seem all that interesting. But don't let those assumptions fool you. T.S. Eliot knew what he was talking about when he called The Moonstone, "The first, the longest, and the best of modern English detective novels."

It would seem impossible to make a Sherlock Holmes type of mystery last for upwards of 500 pages without the story becoming tedious and without the readers crying for it to hurry up and end already, but somehow The Moonstone pulls this off brilliantly.

The entire book is a fluid exchange of events and clues that are never stagnant and serve to keep the reader engaged, entertained, and (in my case at least) totally surprised once everything manages to unfold. There is so much in this book that I did not see coming, and I devoured the ending with surprise and wonder as I was let in on the last big secret and was finally allowed to say, "So THAT'S who did it!"

In a historical context, it was interesting to see the parallel drawn between The Moonstone (published 1868) and the protracted case of the Road Hill Murders in 1860 that launched an all-consuming 'detective fever' within the collective English consciousness. The novel's plot is obviously inspired by real life events, and the novel's Sargeant Cuff is an fitting homage to the real life Scotland Yard detective, Jonathan Whicher, who was in charge of the Road Hill investigation.

This is an incredibly entertaining and satisfying adventure. It is very well written, well thought out, and will truly leave you guessing until the very end. This book is truly a classic and it is more than deserving of such a distinction.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 902 more book reviews
On the surface, this classic mystery novel about a missing gemstone doesn't seem all that interesting. But don't let those assumptions fool you. T.S. Eliot knew what he was talking about when he called The Moonstone, "The first, the longest, and the best of modern English detective novels."

It would seem impossible to make a Sherlock Holmes type of mystery last for upwards of 500 pages without the story becoming tedious and without the readers crying for it to hurry up and end already, but somehow The Moonstone pulls this off brilliantly.

The entire book is a fluid exchange of events and clues that are never stagnant and serve to keep the reader engaged, entertained, and (in my case at least) totally surprised once everything manages to unfold. There is so much in this book that I did not see coming, and I devoured the ending with surprise and wonder as I was let in on the last big secret and was finally allowed to say, "So THAT'S who did it!"

In a historical context, it was interesting to see the parallel drawn between The Moonstone (published 1868) and the protracted case of the Road Hill Murders in 1860 that launched an all-consuming 'detective fever' within the collective English consciousness. The novel's plot is obviously inspired by real life events, and the novel's Sargeant Cuff is an fitting homage to the real life Scotland Yard detective, Jonathan Whicher, who was in charge of the Road Hill investigation.

This is an incredibly entertaining and satisfying adventure. It is very well written, well thought out, and will truly leave you guessing until the very end. This book is truly a classic and it is more than deserving of such a distinction.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 35 more book reviews
I really like Wilkie Collins writing. I have read The Woman in White, The Moonstone and Armadale and found them all great. Highly recommended.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 902 more book reviews
On the surface, this classic mystery novel about a missing gemstone doesn't seem all that interesting. But don't let those assumptions fool you. T.S. Eliot knew what he was talking about when he called The Moonstone, "The first, the longest, and the best of modern English detective novels."

It would seem impossible to make a Sherlock Holmes type of mystery last for upwards of 500 pages without the story becoming tedious and without the readers crying for it to hurry up and end already, but somehow The Moonstone pulls this off brilliantly.

The entire book is a fluid exchange of events and clues that are never stagnant and serve to keep the reader engaged, entertained, and (in my case at least) totally surprised once everything manages to unfold. There is so much in this book that I did not see coming, and I devoured the ending with surprise and wonder as I was let in on the last big secret and was finally allowed to say, "So THAT'S who did it!"

In a historical context, it was interesting to see the parallel drawn between The Moonstone (published 1868) and the protracted case of the Road Hill Murders in 1860 that launched an all-consuming 'detective fever' within the collective English consciousness. The novel's plot is obviously inspired by real life events, and the novel's Sargeant Cuff is an fitting homage to the real life Scotland Yard detective, Jonathan Whicher, who was in charge of the Road Hill investigation.

This is an incredibly entertaining and satisfying adventure. It is very well written, well thought out, and will truly leave you guessing until the very end. This book is truly a classic and it is more than deserving of such a distinction.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 74 more book reviews
Don't let it's description as a classic fool you; this book is a fun read. One of the first detective/mystery novels in English and still one of the best.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 2 more book reviews
"The first, the longest, and the best of modern English detective novels."--T. S. Eliot
reviewed The Moonstone on + 902 more book reviews
On the surface, this classic mystery novel about a missing gemstone doesn't seem all that interesting. But don't let those assumptions fool you. T.S. Eliot knew what he was talking about when he called The Moonstone, "The first, the longest, and the best of modern English detective novels."

It would seem impossible to make a Sherlock Holmes type of mystery last for upwards of 500 pages without the story becoming tedious and without the readers crying for it to hurry up and end already, but somehow The Moonstone pulls this off brilliantly.

The entire book is a fluid exchange of events and clues that are never stagnant and serve to keep the reader engaged, entertained, and (in my case at least) totally surprised once everything manages to unfold. There is so much in this book that I did not see coming, and I devoured the ending with surprise and wonder as I was let in on the last big secret and was finally allowed to say, "So THAT'S who did it!"

In a historical context, it was interesting to see the parallel drawn between The Moonstone (published 1868) and the protracted case of the Road Hill Murders in 1860 that launched an all-consuming 'detective fever' within the collective English consciousness. The novel's plot is obviously inspired by real life events, and the novel's Sargeant Cuff is an fitting homage to the real life Scotland Yard detective, Jonathan Whicher, who was in charge of the Road Hill investigation.

This is an incredibly entertaining and satisfying adventure. It is very well written, well thought out, and will truly leave you guessing until the very end. This book is truly a classic and it is more than deserving of such a distinction.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 15 more book reviews
Very indepth book surrounding the underside of people and what is behind their motives. Anyone could have stolen the Moonstone. "A fascinating excursion into the shadows that lie just beyond the ordered landscape of English society."
reviewed The Moonstone on + 11 more book reviews
This was a good read. He is a bit long in the description area, so some paragraphs are a bit lengthly in detail. I liked this book, and the Seargent was a great character!
reviewed The Moonstone on + 902 more book reviews
On the surface, this classic mystery novel about a missing gemstone doesn't seem all that interesting. But don't let those assumptions fool you. T.S. Eliot knew what he was talking about when he called The Moonstone, "The first, the longest, and the best of modern English detective novels."

It would seem impossible to make a Sherlock Holmes type of mystery last for upwards of 500 pages without the story becoming tedious and without the readers crying for it to hurry up and end already, but somehow The Moonstone pulls this off brilliantly.

The entire book is a fluid exchange of events and clues that are never stagnant and serve to keep the reader engaged, entertained, and (in my case at least) totally surprised once everything manages to unfold. There is so much in this book that I did not see coming, and I devoured the ending with surprise and wonder as I was let in on the last big secret and was finally allowed to say, "So THAT'S who did it!"

In a historical context, it was interesting to see the parallel drawn between The Moonstone (published 1868) and the protracted case of the Road Hill Murders in 1860 that launched an all-consuming 'detective fever' within the collective English consciousness. The novel's plot is obviously inspired by real life events, and the novel's Sargeant Cuff is an fitting homage to the real life Scotland Yard detective, Jonathan Whicher, who was in charge of the Road Hill investigation.

This is an incredibly entertaining and satisfying adventure. It is very well written, well thought out, and will truly leave you guessing until the very end. This book is truly a classic and it is more than deserving of such a distinction.
reviewed The Moonstone on
"Nothing human is perfect, but The Moonstone comes about as near perfection as anything of its kind can be." ~~Dorothy Sayers

Wilkie Collins, a friend of Charles Dickens, has been called The Master of Sensation. He was a brilliant and witty writer, and once again I have nothing but rave reviews for his work. Despite the fantastic nature of The Moonstone's mystery, reputed to be the first English detective novel ever written, the plot is masterfully woven together with subtlety and understatement rather than overt, in-your-face suspense. The dry, wry humor (or humour, rather) of the British variety made me laugh out loud several times.

As in The Woman in White, alternating narrators tell the story. Their individual and sometimes mistaken suspicions about the events and characters involved influence the reader's perceptions about what has happened and where the story is leading. Everything we learn about Miss Rachel Verinder, a key character who is given the Moonstone for her birthday the night it disappears, is through the eyes of the narrators, and each has a different impression of her. The reader must wonder when presented with contradictory information whose interpretation is correct, which, along with a few red herrings, adds to the mystery.

Like the characters involved in the plot to discover what happened to the gem, I also caught "detective fever" as I tried to sort out the details and revelations and make my own interpretations based on the actions of the characters rather than on what they said about each other. And what intriguing characters they are: Gabriel Betteredge, the house steward who, when faced with a challenge, lights his pipe and consults Robinson Crusoe as if it were a book of divination; Franklin Blake, a well-traveled gentleman vying for Rachel's affection; Godfrey Ablewhite, a respected philanthropist and fellow suitor for Rachel; Sergeant Cuff, a renowned detective with a penchant for rose bushes; Miss Drusilla Clack, a devoutly moral woman who throws religious tracts at cab drivers, finds cap-ribbons deplorable, and surreptitiously distributes Christian literature to unsuspecting people who, in her estimation, wrongly suppose that they're already Christians; and others we meet along the way. Add to the mix such things as a reformed thief, a swarthy and piebald medical assistant with a past, a bursting buzzard, shivering sands, and a mysterious trio of traveling performers, and you have an amusing and exciting story that draws you in and keeps you guessing.
reviewed The Moonstone on + 2 more book reviews
I'm not a reader of mysteries, but this was clean, compelling, and impossible to put down!!
reviewed The Moonstone on
The first, the longest, and the best of modern English detective novels. . .Everything that is good in the modern story can be found in The Moonstone." Thus T.S. Eliot described this extraordinary novel, which to this day has the power to draw the reader into its world of danger, suspense, and shocking surprise--a world whose inhabitants come from the usually ignored underside of Victorian life. (From the back cover)
reviewed The Moonstone on + 296 more book reviews
This is considered to be among the very first and finest of what has become a very large group---mystery fiction.