Book Reviews of None Dare Call It Witchcraft

None Dare Call It Witchcraft
None Dare Call It Witchcraft
Author: Gary North
ISBN-13: 9780870003011
ISBN-10: 0870003011
Publication Date: 1976
Pages: 253
Rating:
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0 stars, based on 0 rating
Publisher: Arlington House
Book Type: Unknown Binding
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reviewed None Dare Call It Witchcraft on + 89 more book reviews
this book is a barrage of christian propaganda. can i give it no stars. here is info on the writer i found on the web.

Gary North
(From Wikipedia)


Gary North is a writer and publisher from the Christian Reconstruction movement. (He is the son-in-law of R.J. Rushdoony, one of the movement's founders.) North received a PhD in History from the University of California at Riverside in 1972. He gained some wider notoriety for his inaccurate prediction of Y2K catastrophe before 2000.

Starting in 1967, North became a frequent contributor to the libertarian journal The Freeman. His writings also appear on LewRockwell.com.

Theological beliefs
Most Christian Reconstructionists hold to a type of Postmillennialism that holds that Jesus will return to earth only after Trinitarian Christianity has become the religion of the majority of the planet, with God's moral law as the civil standard for society. They believe that Old Testament moral and civil laws, such as those against adultery and sodomy and murder, should be presumed binding unless the New Testament says otherwise; this belief they call theonomy. Critics argue that what North is describing would be a theocracy, and that North and other Postmillennial proponents of Dominion Theology have influenced the growth of the Dominionist tendency among the much larger (and largely Premillennialist) Christian Right.[
Theologically, Gary North is a Calvinist. He is President of the Institute for Christian Economics[1] which publishes many, but not all, Christian Reconstructionist books online. Christian Reconstructionists are also presuppositionalists in their approach to Christian apologetics as taught by the Calvinist philosopher, Cornelius Van Til and oppose any natural law theory as a basis for civil law order.