Book Reviews of Rebecca's Tale

Rebecca's Tale
Rebecca's Tale
Author: Sally Beauman
ISBN-13: 9780066211084
ISBN-10: 0066211085
Publication Date: 10/2001
Pages: 448
Rating:
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 19

3.7 stars, based on 19 ratings
Publisher: William Morrow Company
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

10 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Rebecca's Tale on + 149 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
Published more than 60 years ago, Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca still captivates, at least partly because of its insistent ambiguity: we never learn definitively whether Maxim de Winter murdered his stunning first wife, Rebecca, or why Maxim so hastily remarried a mousy younger woman, famously unnamed. Selected by the du Maurier estate, Beauman (Destiny) has written a "companion" to Rebecca that preserves, and even deepens, the earlier novel's crafty evasions. Set in 1951, two decades after Rebecca's death was ruled a suicide, Beauman's story opens with the same (now famous) sentence as the earlier book: "Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again." Elderly, ailing Colonel Arthur Julyan was magistrate in the district when the legendary de Winter mansion mysteriously burned to the ground. Julyan's last days are disturbed by the intrusive visits of Terence Gray, a Scottish academic who claims to be writing a book about Rebecca's death. Then both Julyan's sharp daughter Ellie and Gray, who has secrets of his own, become rattled when Rebecca's personal effects begin arriving at the Julyan home. One of the anonymously sent packages contains Rebecca's journal, written just before her death a possible Rosetta stone. Beauman expertly tells Rebecca's tale from four different perspectives Julyan's, Gray's, Ellie's and, most vividly, Rebecca's without settling which version is nearest the truth. Though a composite Rebecca emerges depressive, possibly schizophrenic, promiscuous, fearless and almost certainly "dangerous" Beauman merely hints at a biological cause, raising titillating, though fully plausible, possibilities. This lushly imagined sequel, which cleverly reproduces the cadences of du Maurier's prose, resurrects Manderley without sweeping away all the artful old cobwebs. Readers should pounce.
reviewed Rebecca's Tale on
Helpful Score: 1
"Sequel" to Daphne du Maurier's _Rebecca_, which pretends to continue the tale 20 years after the death of the first Mrs. de Winter.
It's no _Rebecca_, but Sally Beauman had a fun idea for a book.

A breezy read.
reviewed Rebecca's Tale on + 13 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A mystery set around the death of Rebecca, the beautiful and mysterious first wife of Maxim De Winter. Well done characterizations and an excellent sense of place.
reviewed Rebecca's Tale on + 75 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This book should be read as the final installment of a trilogy.

"Rebecca" is a wonderful story which leaves many questions unaswered. Susan Hill's "Mrs. DeWinter" answers many of those questions and finishes the story of Maxim and his 2nd wife.

"Rebecca's Tale" lets us in on some, but certainly not all, of her history and gives insight into who she was.

Something about it wasn't quite right but overall I enjoyed the read and now feel that I have the complete story.

This is the 3rd book. Mrs De Winter, the 2nd to Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca

http://www.dumaurier.org/reviews-rebecca.html
reviewed Rebecca's Tale on + 2 more book reviews
If you loved Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca, you will also really enjoy this modern sequel.
reviewed Rebecca's Tale on + 8 more book reviews
A companion to Daphne du Maurier's "Rebecca"

This book is set in April 1951, 20 years after "Rebecca"
reviewed Rebecca's Tale on + 113 more book reviews
From the back: April 1951. It is twenty years since the death of Rebecca, the hauntingly beautiful first wife of Maxim de Winter. Twenty years since Manderley, the de Winter family's estate, was destroyed by fire. But Rebecca's tale is just beginning.
Colonel Julyan, an old family friend, receives an anonymous package concerning Rebecca. An inquisitive young scholar named Terence Gray appears and stirs up the quiet seaside hamlet with disturbing questions about the past - and with the close ties he soon forges with the Colonel and his eligible daughter, Ellie. Amid bitter gossip and murky intrigue, the trio begins a search for the real Rebecca, and the truth behind her mysterious death.
reviewed Rebecca's Tale on + 10 more book reviews
Fasinating new look at Rebecca as a person not a ghost of personality
reviewed Rebecca's Tale on + 75 more book reviews
This book should be read as the final installment of a trilogy.

"Rebecca" is a wonderful story which leaves many questions unaswered. Susan Hill's "Mrs. DeWinter" answers many of those questions and finishes the story of Maxim and his 2nd wife.

"Rebecca's Tale" lets us in on some, but certainly not all, of her history and gives insight into who she was.

Something about it wasn't quite right but overall I enjoyed the read and now feel that I have the complete story.

This is the 3rd book. Mrs De Winter, the 2nd to Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca

http://www.dumaurier.org/reviews-rebecca.html
reviewed Rebecca's Tale on + 60 more book reviews
I only read the first chapter of this book. I did not care for the authors writing style and couldn't discipline myself to read it.