Book Reviews of The Schoolboy

The Schoolboy
The Schoolboy
Author: Tony Rosa
ISBN-13: 9780595380817
ISBN-10: 0595380816
Publication Date: 4/5/2006
Pages: 116
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 1

4 stars, based on 1 rating
Publisher: iUniverse, Inc.
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

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Reviewed by Grandma Bev for TeensReadToo.com

Fourteen-year old Sam Parma has only played one game of 9-hole golf in his life...he's a baseball guy...but Sam's mom wants Sam and his little brother, Matthew, to enter the renowned Schoolboy Junior Golf Tournament that Uncle Charlie won when he was a teenager. It's an annual event and both boys can enter the competition since there are separate categories for each age group. The tournament is today, and she plans to drop the boys off at the golf course. The set of clubs that Grandpa had given Sam are stamped "ladies" on the bottom, and most are repaired with electrical tape. He would like to have a better set of clubs, but, oh well...it will probably be fun.

Sam is teamed up with three older boys in the fourteen to seventeen age bracket. There is Chad Ashworth, Jr., who is dressed to the nines, and has a professional set of new looking clubs. Definitely a Country Club kind of guy and probably nearly a pro. Buzzy uses verbal profanity and throws loud tantrums when things don't go quite the way he wants. The third boy is a seventeen-year-old, cigarette-smoking, long-haired kid named Mark Crowe. His indifferent attitude makes him seem like bad news from the start.

Sam definitely has his ups-and-downs during the game, but he meets the challenges with integrity and honesty, and makes an exciting par on the 7th hole. There are many unexpected obstacles, and a frightening confrontation between Sam and Mark Crowe as Sam stands up for what he knows is right. Matthew, as well, has a surprising game result.

Tony Rosa has penned this exciting, fast-paced story based on some of his own experiences. Rosa incorporates some wonderful moral lessons in this easy-to-read story that would encourage even reluctant readers to join Sam Parma in a game of golf. The realistic characters are just like some people that you probably know. I hope to see more of Sam's adventures from this talented first-time author.