Book Reviews of A Scientific Romance : A Novel

A Scientific Romance : A Novel
A Scientific Romance A Novel
Author: Ronald Wright
ISBN-13: 9780312199999
ISBN-10: 0312199996
Publication Date: 1/15/1999
Pages: 352
Rating:
  • Currently 3.2/5 Stars.
 3

3.2 stars, based on 3 ratings
Publisher: Picador
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed A Scientific Romance : A Novel on + 578 more book reviews
I remember buying this book when it first came out in 1998 after reading a review of it in the Washington Post and have finally gotten around to reading it. Time travel stories and movies have always fascinated me and this story of travel to the year 2500 A.D. was no exception. In this, the protagonist discovers that the time machine of H.G. Wells was returning to London in 1999. He also learns that he is afflicted with CJD (mad cow disease) and so decides to travel to the future in hopes of a cure and then perhaps to the past (if possible) to save the love of his life who died from CJD. Well the future is not what he expected. The human population is decimated by disease, global warming, and war - there is no one left in London and it is all but gone, covered with tropical growth in a hot and humid climate. Without giving away too much of the story, as he explores this new world, he is able to piece together what happened and reflects on his past life and the mistakes he made. I was a little disappointed with the ending and sometimes the language used in the novel was a little hard to follow without using a dictionary, but overall, I would give this a mild recommendation.
reviewed A Scientific Romance : A Novel on + 25 more book reviews
Excellent time travel take off from HG Wells land.
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From Publishers Weekly: "English-born historian
Wright, who lives in Canada, is the author of several celebrated works of nonfiction, including Time Among the Maya and Stolen Continents, but his first novel is such a triumph that it's a wonder he didn't get around to writing one earlier. The plot is something of a curiosity: English archeologist David Lambert stumbles upon a Victorian time machine?the very one, it turns out, that H.G. Wells described in his famous novel. When Lambert discovers that he may have the same disease that killed his lover, he lights out for the future: A.D. 2500, to be exact. There Wright creates for him a vivid, compelling world, a depopulated, tropical dream of what had once been England. The book's central drama is Lambert's struggle to excavate and uncover the exact nature of the calamity that erased London. At the same time, he sifts through the shards of his own unhappy personal history?which he is, of course, tempted to touch up a little with the help of the time machine. The narrative bristles with fascinating characters, both fictional and historical, and Wright furnishes it with a rich store of enthralling scientific Victoriana. His writing is charming, unpretentious and wonderfully literate. J.G. Ballard explored this same territory in his disaster novels of the 1970s, but never with Wright's psychological insight or pathos." Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.