Book Reviews of Shall We Dance?

Shall We Dance?
Shall We Dance
Author: Judith A. Lansdowne
ISBN-13: 9780821770184
ISBN-10: 0821770187
Publication Date: 3/1/2002
Pages: 352
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 14

3.8 stars, based on 14 ratings
Publisher: Zebra Books
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

2 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Shall We Dance? on + 3389 more book reviews
Josiah Elliot wants to marry the woman he's desperately in love with, Lady Miranda Wesley. Unfortunately, she the daughter of a duke, so Josiah, who actually does possess some claim to aristocratic blood, must prove that he is worthy in order to ask for Miranda's hand in marriage (the fact that Miranda couldn't really care less what her family thinks or desires, somehow doesn't really dawn on our worthy hero, but never mind). This task however proves more difficult than it seems as Josiah cannot find the proof (a family bible with his lineage neatly mapped out) now that his brother has mysteriously died; add to that the disappearance of his two nephews and the fact that the family home and all it's contents seems to be in the hands of a childhood enemy, and Josiah's hopes of winning Miranda's brother's approval seems moot. And this is where the Earl of Blazingame comes into the picture. Seemingly a dilettante, Blazingame is actually a very intelligent young man who is very good at ferreting out bits of information and solving puzzles. Josiah's friend, Daxonberry (and Miranda's nephew) hopes that Blazingame will be able to help Josiah discover where his nephews could have disappeared to, and why Josiah's brother left things so badly settled. Will Josiah and Blazingame find what they are looking for? The game grows even more difficult, when the two men discover that there are those who would do anything to stop them to discovering what really happened to the Elliot family and fortune.
reviewed Shall We Dance? on + 116 more book reviews
zebra historical romance
Perhaps his birthright was questionable....
But his appeal was undeniable