Book Reviews of Three Clams and an Oyster

Three Clams and an Oyster
Three Clams and an Oyster
Author: Randy Powell
ISBN-13: 9780374400071
ISBN-10: 0374400075
Publication Date: 9/5/2006
Pages: 224
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
 1

5 stars, based on 1 rating
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

2 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Three Clams and an Oyster on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Carrie Spellman for TeensReadToo.com

Flint McCallister is the captain of a four-man flag football team. The weekend before the beginning of the season he finds himself one man short, sort of. Flint, Rick Beaterson, Dwight Deshutsis, and Cade Savage have been friends since first grade. Lately though, they can't seem to count on Cade. He doesn't show up for practice, doesn't call, and spends a lot of time getting drunk and high, things the other boys don't agree with. So now they're in a difficult position. Do they keep hoping their old friend will come around, or do they replace him? If they replace him, who do they get instead?

The Clams try out a few people half-heartedly and with mixed and rather amusing results. Their best prospect is a girl. But are they ready to deal with a girl on their team? Are they ready to deal with the changes that will make between them? Above and beyond all, what do they do about Cade?

A great look at the nature of friendship, this book is more about the interaction between people than about football. It will appeal to girls and boys alike, and for similar reasons, but with different affects. It's interesting for me, as a girl, to get an idea of how teenage boys think. Friendships aren't so different, whether it be groups of boys or groups of girls, and the subtle shift that occurs when the opposite sex appears. The book itself is almost profound in its subtlety. Reading this reminded me of all of the times I've been the only girl in a room full of boys. Eventually they forget you're there, and you get to hear some pretty surprising stuff. And the most surprising part is how similar it is when girls talk with their good friends.
reviewed Three Clams and an Oyster on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Carrie Spellman for TeensReadToo.com

Flint McCallister is the captain of a four-man flag football team. The weekend before the beginning of the season he finds himself one man short, sort of. Flint, Rick Beaterson, Dwight Deshutsis, and Cade Savage have been friends since first grade. Lately though, they can't seem to count on Cade. He doesn't show up for practice, doesn't call, and spends a lot of time getting drunk and high, things the other boys don't agree with. So now they're in a difficult position. Do they keep hoping their old friend will come around, or do they replace him? If they replace him, who do they get instead?

The Clams try out a few people half-heartedly and with mixed and rather amusing results. Their best prospect is a girl. But are they ready to deal with a girl on their team? Are they ready to deal with the changes that will make between them? Above and beyond all, what do they do about Cade?

A great look at the nature of friendship, this book is more about the interaction between people than about football. It will appeal to girls and boys alike, and for similar reasons, but with different affects. It's interesting for me, as a girl, to get an idea of how teenage boys think. Friendships aren't so different, whether it be groups of boys or groups of girls, and the subtle shift that occurs when the opposite sex appears. The book itself is almost profound in its subtlety. Reading this reminded me of all of the times I've been the only girl in a room full of boys. Eventually they forget you're there, and you get to hear some pretty surprising stuff. And the most surprising part is how similar it is when girls talk with their good friends.