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Topic: Top 5 German Fiction Writers of the 18th & 19th centuries.

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Subject: Top 5 German Fiction Writers of the 18th & 19th centuries.
Date Posted: 7/7/2009 1:38 AM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2009
Posts: 169
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Johann Von Goethe

Fredrich Schiller

E.T.A. Hoffman

Heinrich von Kleist

Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué

 

Date Posted: 7/7/2009 8:41 AM ET
Member Since: 9/20/2008
Posts: 402
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Interesting post. I have heard of Goethe but not any of the others. What are some of their more famous works? Why did you choose them? I remember a previous post of yours about Kleist (I think) writing great horror. Am I right?  This time period in literature is new to me so I am looking forward to hearing more of your views on it.



Last Edited on: 7/7/09 8:51 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 7/8/2009 7:45 AM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2009
Posts: 169
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Each of these men wrote during the "Romanticism" period in European literature.

"The movement stressed strong emotion as a source of aesthetic experience, placing new emphasis on such emotions as trepidation, horror and awe—especially that which is experienced in confronting the sublimity of untamed nature and its picturesque qualities"(wikipedia)

Heinrich von Kleist is a favorite of mine.

Date Posted: 7/8/2009 3:12 PM ET
Member Since: 9/25/2006
Posts: 314
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I have read only "Werther" Johann Von Goethe and  E.T.A. Hoffman. I'd recommend them both and the The Best Tales of Hoffmann :: E.T.A. Hoffmann is now on my shelf. The 18th century imagination has captured my attention lately, very rough it was, tolerant of lots of cheating and brawlilng and not doing one's duty. I mean, the Victorains had to be reacting against something.

 



Last Edited on: 7/10/09 3:09 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 7/9/2009 1:20 AM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2009
Posts: 169
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If only I had some credits left Matt B., I would request your ETA. Hoffman book. Oh well...

Date Posted: 7/9/2009 8:27 AM ET
Member Since: 6/19/2007
Posts: 5,931
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I read Goethe's Sorrows of Young Werther and Kleist's Michael Kohlhaas and Marquise of O-.  I've read bits of Faust and always meant to finish it, but haven't yet.  I wasn't really a fan of Kleist.

Date Posted: 7/10/2009 1:56 AM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2009
Posts: 169
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For me it was always the context of Kleist's personal life that drove any interest in me to read his stories.

Date Posted: 7/12/2009 5:45 PM ET
Member Since: 1/30/2009
Posts: 5,696
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Schiller's play Mary Stuart has been done a lot recently - there have been a few interesting adaptations.   Schiller also wrote the text for Beethoven's "Ode to Joy".

There's also lots of fun Hoffman business in Robertson Davies' The Lyre of Orpheus (the third book in the Cornish trilogy). 



Last Edited on: 7/12/09 11:18 PM ET - Total times edited: 1