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Topic: Trade Books???

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Subject: Trade Books???
Date Posted: 10/9/2009 12:56 AM ET
Member Since: 4/28/2009
Posts: 9,576
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  I've been told by multiple members that the reason my WL books aren't being requested is because I have "mass media" versions instead of the larger Trade books all you longtime PBS members want.  I don't understand what the attraction is.  Also, I don't think I've ever seen a trade book for sale---where do you buy them????

Date Posted: 10/9/2009 2:49 AM ET
Member Since: 1/23/2009
Posts: 3,041
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Trade paperbacks can be bought anywhere. They are just the larger sized paperbacks, and are quite common. They usually run from 12.00-14.00, on average, sometimes a little less or a little more. Mass market paperbacks are the smaller sized paperbacks, and run about 6.99-7.99. Some people prefer trade paperbacks, especially when it's a book one wants for keeps, because they hold up better than mass markets. Mass markets are often cheaply bound, the glue unsticks from the binding, and pages come loose. Mass markets are generally easier for me to hold (and can fit in a purse) but I don't find myself really preferring one over the other. I will take what is available.

Sorry you are having problems with getting your books ordered. I'm sure if someone gets tired or antsy waiting for a specific binding they might order a different one.

Date Posted: 10/9/2009 5:38 AM ET
Member Since: 7/19/2008
Posts: 15,399
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My Father, who is in his 80s and has poor eyesight, can read the trade sized PBs, but not the MMPBs.  The font is the size of the hard covers, but not as heavy.
 

Date Posted: 10/9/2009 7:06 AM ET
Member Since: 8/23/2007
Posts: 26,510
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I actuall prefer mmp myself but will read what ever binding of a book comes to me first-usually, sometimes I prefer audio.  But tradesize books aren't hard to find.  Like others said, they are easier for some people ot hold and the print tends to be a little larger and there fore easier to read.  And they do generally hold up better. They are making mmps so cheaply now that you have to be really careful reading htem if you want a postable spine when you're done.

Rick B. (bup) - ,
Date Posted: 10/9/2009 7:16 AM ET
Member Since: 11/2/2007
Posts: 2,625
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"Trade paperbacks" are usually the same (imprint?) as the hardback - that is, every page is the same - in the larger typeface, on pages large enough with big enough margins that you're not reading words down into the crack, or breaking the spine to avoid that.

Date Posted: 10/9/2009 8:25 AM ET
Member Since: 8/16/2007
Posts: 15,186
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It also isn't so much that people don't want the MMP, its that they are printed in such mass that they are common and tend to build up large quantities into the system quickly. There may be orders on them, but there are so many other copies available that it will take a while for yours to be requested.

The Wishes on those types of books are not usually people just looking to read the book, but are looking for a specific version that they can keep and it will hold up longer like the Hard Cover and Trade size paperbacks do. Audio books are fairly obvious on why another version won't work.

Date Posted: 10/9/2009 9:58 AM ET
Member Since: 5/14/2009
Posts: 6,852
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I find many at FOL sales, but they do go fast so you need to go early.  I have also gotten some off of ebay.  Try this site booksalefinder.com to find FOL and ongoing book sales in your area.  Click on your state and a list will appear.   I live on the border of MA and NH - so I will look for sales in both states.  There may be others, this is only a list of sales that Libraries submit to this website. 

Date Posted: 10/10/2009 10:04 AM ET
Member Since: 1/15/2006
Posts: 381
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I agree with Melanie.... it is more the fact that MMPB are just like the name implies, mass marketed (and less expensive), so they quickly build up in the system.   If you are buying new, trade size is more commonly found in bookstores than in grocery stores and such where there are more mass market PBs.  But you can still find some in the grocery store or Target, etc.

Though I don't particularly care whether I get a book that is Mass Market or Trade size, if given a choice I prefer the trade size because the size feels more comfortable to me for reading and the spines don't seem to crease as easily.  If you are looking for used books, I find them at FOL sales, thrift stores, UBS, yard sales...anywhere you normally find used books.

Date Posted: 10/10/2009 10:34 AM ET
Member Since: 10/21/2007
Posts: 3,430
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As others have mentioned, the small print can be a problem for some people.  I can read small print, but it hurts my eyes after a while so I prefer trade size paperbacks (the larger more expensive paperbacks) or hardcovers so I don't get a headache when I read.  Also, mass market paperbacks are made with cheaper paper & glue, so the pages yellow quickly & the pages separate from the binding more easily.  This is just a general statement about what I've observed & not a criticism of your particular books. 

Date Posted: 10/10/2009 5:33 PM ET
Member Since: 8/19/2007
Posts: 4,243
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I also thought that trade size was the larger 5x7 book.  Am I wrong on ths one?  Pat

Date Posted: 10/10/2009 6:50 PM ET
Member Since: 8/23/2007
Posts: 26,510
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Trade size can come in varying sizes.  There is also a new mass market  paperback size that is taller than the standard but the same size across as an mmp.  Looking at my shelf: the tradesize are all just a tad smaller than a full size hardcover and about the same size as a book club hardcover.

Date Posted: 10/11/2009 9:37 AM ET
Member Since: 4/6/2006
Posts: 236
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Rick B. has it right - the trades are the hardcover version in a pbk cover.  Also the mass pbk's are cheaper paper - the origin of the term 'Pulp" fiction.

Margaret